Mountain Maps

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ewink

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This might be off topic, but does anyone have a link to maps that show what each set of mountains surrounding the Las Vegas valley? Myself and some co-workers are trying to clear up some wildfire confusion when we realized we can't tell one range from the next!

Thanks in advance!
 

SCPD

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ewink said:
This might be off topic, but does anyone have a link to maps that show what each set of mountains surrounding the Las Vegas valley? Myself and some co-workers are trying to clear up some wildfire confusion when we realized we can't tell one range from the next!

Thanks in advance!
Go to the Forest Service or BLM district office in west Las Vegas or the small visitor center in Kyle Canyon and obtain the map of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Spring Mountains National Recreation Area and the Las Vegas District Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area. That map will allow you to pinpoint fires when a legal description is transmitted. It will be in Township, Range, and Section (usually located down to a quarter section or 160 acre area) and this map covers the area west of Las Vegas. If you go to the BLM District Office you can get a very large BLM map that shows land status, township and range, and names of mountain ranges around the entire state of Nevada. It is not very detailed as it covers the whole state, but is better than buying up all the BLM 1/2" to the mile land status maps as you would have to spend quite a bit of money to cover everything in the BLM's Las Vegas District.

Map software programs don't have legal description capability. If latitude and longitude is given rather than township, range, and section they will pinpoint a fire rather well for you, however, quite often the legal description is what you hear and a computer with anything but USGS topographical quadrangles will not help locate places using the legal.

I would recommend the BLM's state map. It is about 5-6 feet high and 3 feet wide, but worth the price and the hassle of its size. If you take care of it, it will last for many years (two decades plus for me) and helps locate incidents all over the state while showing jurisdiction as well. The Forest Service map I mentioned earlier is a must have also.
 
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