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MS350R wide or narrow on GMRS?

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Thunderknight

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I have a pair of Motorola MS350R FRS/GMRS repeater capable radios. I'm wondering if anyone knows if they are wide or narrow band on the GMRS channels? The manual doesn't say.

I'm thinking narrow band as the emission designator is 5K40F3E (FCC ID K7GMSCEJ).

Thanks
 
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FRS has always been narrow band, 2.5KHz deviation, but GMRS is currently wide band, 5KHz deviation, and there isn't any change to that announced. this is all i know on GMRS
 
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RFI-EMI-GUY

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Those are narrow band and point to a problem with so called FRS/GMRS radios. Most if not all are not true GMRS radios. Most lack repeater capability, and it appears all have compromised deviation. The real reason the FRS/GMRS combos are marketed is for specsmanship. If a vendor offers 22 channels versus 14 or a fictitious 38 miles versus fictitious 18, then unwary consumers will choose that product. The FCC should never have permitted them.

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Thunderknight

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5 kHz (wide band) is the maximum deviation...but running 2.5 kHz (narrowband) on GMRS is legal.

I currently have my GMRS equipment, including my personal repeater, programmed as wide band...but I acquired a pair of these MS350R so maybe I'll go narrow band. These combo radios do have repeater capability on the GMRS pairs and are 2 watts on the GMRS channels.

Going narrow band on the repeater input should reduce the chance of adjacent channel desense from any FRS users.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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(snip)


Going narrow band on the repeater input should reduce the chance of adjacent channel desense from any FRS users.
It will result in a significant performance penalty. The risk is not equal to the reward.



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wa1nic

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In my experience with several of them, I think that most bubble pack radios are NFM all the time, even in GMRS channels.

FWIW, when the narrow band initiative on business radios happened, most users (including myself) noticed a reduction in range after switching to NFM.
 

amphibian

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In my experience with several of them, I think that most bubble pack radios are NFM all the time, even in GMRS channels.

FWIW, when the narrow band initiative on business radios happened, most users (including myself) noticed a reduction in range after switching to NFM.
You are correct in saying that there is a reduction in range with the use of narrow banding....


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KB7MIB

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I believe that the Arizona GMRS Repeater Club runs narrow FM on their Phoenix area repeaters. You'd have to ask them about any performance reduction they may have experienced.

http://www.phx550.com

Edit: The club owned repeater, and 2 of the 3 member owned repeaters, are NFM. The third member owned repeater is not.

John
Peoria, AZ
 
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KG7LER

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I believe that the Arizona GMRS Repeater Club runs narrow FM on their Phoenix area repeaters. You'd have to ask them about any performance reduction they may have experienced.

http://www.phx550.com

Edit: The club owned repeater, and 2 of the 3 member owned repeaters, are NFM. The third member owned repeater is not.

John
Peoria, AZ
That is correct, we are mainly running narrowband, our White Tanks repeater gets 60 miles using a 5 watt portable with very good signal reports.
 

KB7MIB

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That is correct, we are mainly running narrowband, our White Tanks repeater gets 60 miles using a 5 watt portable with very good signal reports.
If you're currently achieving 60 miles with an HT (which should easily cover the majority of the Valley, mountain shadowing notwithstanding), what was, or would be, the coverage of the 550 machine if it had remained at 5 kHz deviation?

BTW, although GMRS licensed, I'm not active, as there isn't much interest in radio by my family.

John
Peoria, AZ
 

KG7LER

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If you're currently achieving 60 miles with an HT (which should easily cover the majority of the Valley, mountain shadowing notwithstanding), what was, or would be, the coverage of the 550 machine if it had remained at 5 kHz deviation?

BTW, although GMRS licensed, I'm not active, as there isn't much interest in radio by my family.

John
Peoria, AZ
We are getting way more than 60 miles, that was just me testing from a job site. Our distance is limited to line of site for the most part, 5 kHz would not gain us much of anything.
 

amphibian

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We are getting way more than 60 miles, that was just me testing from a job site. Our distance is limited to line of site for the most part, 5 kHz would not gain us much of anything.

IMHO if you are in fact getting 60 miles off a handheld 5 watt transmitter that is programmed for NB then you have an exceptional system. I'm not saying it isn't true as I don't know your setup, location, etc.. but, if that is really true.... then 5 kh WB would in fact gain you approx a 8% increase in area coverage.... In most of the frequency spectrum by going NB it can cost you between 6-12% coverage capabilities...

To many people (including FCC) have the misconception that by going NB you gain so so so much more, but the actuality of it is, by doing so, you only gain a few more frequencies to use and that's it.....

I myself would never encourage the use of NB for a repeater system if one is trying to cover a very large (30 miles or more) area but would encourage it for in city coverage if it were for cities of a major population and after it's been proven all frequencies were in use and no other options were available....

Now if you want better use of the spectrum, do Digital....not NB....

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USGRMS Repeater & Users Group Association, CEO
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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IMHO if you are in fact getting 60 miles off a handheld 5 watt transmitter that is programmed for NB then you have an exceptional system. I'm not saying it isn't true as I don't know your setup, location, etc.. but, if that is really true.... then 5 kh WB would in fact gain you approx a 8% increase in area coverage.... In most of the frequency spectrum by going NB it can cost you between 6-12% coverage capabilities...

To many people (including FCC) have the misconception that by going NB you gain so so so much more, but the actuality of it is, by doing so, you only gain a few more frequencies to use and that's it.....

I myself would never encourage the use of NB for a repeater system if one is trying to cover a very large (30 miles or more) area but would encourage it for in city coverage if it were for cities of a major population and after it's been proven all frequencies were in use and no other options were available....

Now if you want better use of the spectrum, do Digital....not NB....

________________________
William R Howell, WQYX489
USGRMS Repeater & Users Group Association, CEO
You certainly don't gain any more repeater channels in GMRS by going analog narrow band, yet I see that argument time and time again. Hint, where are those FRS channels already?

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