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Multiple Scanners - One Antenna???

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bigdaddyduke

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I am wondering if there is a BNC connector that will split one antenna feed into multiple outputs for either mobile or base use. I have heard of using standard coax splitters but am wondering if there is one specifically for BNC for simplicity.

Thanks
 
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N_Jay

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bigdaddyduke said:
I am wondering if there is a BNC connector that will split one antenna feed into multiple outputs for either mobile or base use. I have heard of using standard coax splitters but am wondering if there is one specifically for BNC for simplicity.

Thanks
Yes there are BNC "T" connectors, but NO, that is the wrong way to do it.

Use a splitter.

If you want to spend the $$, you can get BNC splitters (usually called a multicoupler)
 

bigdaddyduke

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from parts unknown (aka Maine)
Can you tell me why using a T is the wrong way? I wouldnt' want to use a T anyways as I want to be able to use 3 or sometimes 4 scanners off one antenna...just wondering why a T is the wrong way to go.

Thanks again
 
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N_Jay

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bigdaddyduke said:
Can you tell me why using a T is the wrong way? I wouldnt' want to use a T anyways as I want to be able to use 3 or sometimes 4 scanners off one antenna...just wondering why a T is the wrong way to go.

Thanks again
That's a 3 credit 300 level course called "Electromagnetic Waves and Fields" with a 1 credit lab on Propagation and Transmission lines.
 

KT4HX

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Spotsylvania County, Va
bigdaddyduke said:
Can you tell me why using a T is the wrong way? I wouldnt' want to use a T anyways as I want to be able to use 3 or sometimes 4 scanners off one antenna...just wondering why a T is the wrong way to go.

Thanks again

In a nutshell, if you split the signal to multiple scanners without amplification then you are dividing the original signal level by a factor of how many splits you incorporate. In otherwords, if you feed four scanners with one antenna by passively splitting the signal then each scanner will receive about 25% of the original signal strength.

If however, you utilize an active multicoupler (amplification), then each output port of the multicoupler would deliver 100% of the original signal being fed by the antenna to the multicoupler. And thus each scanner would receive full signal level.
 

prcguy

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That’s if you’re using a “splitter”. Using a “T” connector to split a signal to two destinations will have additional losses because the antenna will see around a 25 ohm load if two 50 ohm cables are used to feed each scanner. At least a “splitter” or “divider” will keep the impedance consistent throughout the system.
prcguy
KT4HX said:
In a nutshell, if you split the signal to multiple scanners without amplification then you are dividing the original signal level by a factor of how many splits you incorporate. In otherwords, if you feed four scanners with one antenna by passively splitting the signal then each scanner will receive about 25% of the original signal strength.

If however, you utilize an active multicoupler (amplification), then each output port of the multicoupler would deliver 100% of the original signal being fed by the antenna to the multicoupler. And thus each scanner would receive full signal level.
 

ex8010

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ex8010
i tried using a "t", but the scanners interfered with each other. I got a stridesberg multicoupler now. one of the best toys ever. I think it actuall makes the signal stronger
 
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antenna multi-coupler

There is a multi-coupler that will run 2,4,6,8 scanners from one antenna. you can search "multi-coupler" on this site. I'm pretty sure that there are a couple of posts on that subject in the antenna forum and one or more of them should have a link to companies that sell them.

Mark
 
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N_Jay

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prcguy said:
That’s if you’re using a “splitter”. Using a “T” connector to split a signal to two destinations will have additional losses because the antenna will see around a 25 ohm load if two 50 ohm cables are used to feed each scanner. At least a “splitter” or “divider” will keep the impedance consistent throughout the system.
prcguy
If it were only so simple.:roll: :lol:
 
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