• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

national sos network in connecticut

Status
Not open for further replies.

wesct

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2005
Messages
750
Location
Connecticut
New Public Emergency Communications Network 'National SOS' to Conduct Statewide Connecticut Emergency Preparedness Drill on June 17th
2 hours, 13 minutes ago
Hartford, CT (PRWEB) June 6, 2006 -- The National SOS Radio Network -- www.NationalSOS.com -- has selected Connecticut as the site for America's first public test of a new emergency communications system. The drill, open to all Connecticut residents, will occur on Saturday, June 17, 2006 from 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. local time.
This public emergency network is comprised of the 100 million low-cost Family Radio Service (FRS) radios already in use for camping, boating, hiking, biking, neighborhood and family communications, etc. In addition, 700,000 amateur (ham) radio operators, 70,000 licensed General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) users, and hundreds of thousands of scanner users have been invited to augment the system.
The goal: Create initial awareness of the network before the peak of the hurricane season.
In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a major contributing factor to the tragic loss of life was the near total breakdown of communication systems. When electricity, telephone, and cell phone services failed, people were unable to let neighbors, family, and rescuers know of their dire situation -- and some died as a result.
The National SOS Radio Network puts emergency communications capabilities directly in the hands of the public. It's based on neighborhoods and communities using low-cost FRS radios as an emergency communications tool. The FRS radios enable intra-neighborhood communications, especially in situations where the public's primary communication tools fail due to a natural or manmade disaster. As an adjunct to the neighborhood / community network, it is planned that ham, GMRS, and scanner operators could also monitor the primary FRS frequencies -- and relay emergency messages to police and fire departments, and national rescue and relief agencies. The Connecticut drill includes testing the feasibility of this portion of the network (see below for details).
FRS radios and FRS / GMRS combination radios used strictly under FRS regulations don't require an operator license, can be used by anyone of any age, and are available for as little as $10 - $30 at many retailers and online stores. Because of their low cost and widespread availability, these radios can be part of every home's emergency kit (flashlight, water, FRS radio, batteries, etc.).
The Connecticut "National SOS" drill is comprised of two concurrent tests:
(1) Statewide neighborhood preparedness tests.
(2) Experimental test of a Hartford-area receiving station.
-- Neighborhood preparedness tests: Citizens across Connecticut are encouraged to learn how to use their FRS radios to communicate in their own neighborhood. During the 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. drill period, people should tune their FRS radios to Channel 1 and see how well they can talk to their neighbors. Channel 1 was selected as the primary emergency channel as it is easy to remember and has been previously endorsed by radio manufacturers (such as Midland Radio Corporation), the DC Emergency Communication Network, and by REACT (Radio Emergency Associated Communications Teams) in 2000.
VERY IMPORTANT: For all of the various brands of FRS radios to universally communicate, the FRS radio's "privacy tone" or "privacy code" must be turned off. The "off" setting (for some radios, the zero setting) is the typical default, out-of-the-box, setting of most FRS radios. The instruction manuals of FRS radios also provide easy instructions for turning off the privacy tone / privacy code feature.
The National SOS Radio Network would like to hear from citizens regarding the success of their neighborhood tests. Feedback should be e-mailed to the special address viewable on this page: http://www.NationalSOS.com/publicfeedback.html
-- Experimental test of a Hartford-area receiving station: Concurrent with the short-range neighborhood tests, the National SOS Radio Network will conduct an experimental test between one of its FCC-licensed receiving stations and the general public in the west-central area of Connecticut. The range of this test (based on recent 500 milliwatt FRS field tests) is expected to be 10 - 15 miles. Residents of Hartford, West Hartford, Bloomfield, Simsbury, Avon, Farmington, Canton, and Southington are encouraged to participate.
To participate, residents should tune their FRS radios to Channel 3 with "privacy tone" or "privacy code" turned off (or zero). It is important to note that during an actual declared emergency, residents would tune to Channel 1 -- the primary emergency communication channel. However, for this phase of the drill, Channel 3 was selected so as to not interfere with the neighborhood tests that will be occurring at the same time.
During the 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. drill period, citizens in the above-listed towns should attempt to contact the National SOS Radio Network's Hartford-area receiving station. A citizen should simply press the push-to-talk button on the radio and say, for example, "This is Dorothy Smith on Main Street in Simsbury calling the National SOS receiving station." If you are heard by a National SOS representative at the receiving station, the representative will respond back to you. Also note that standing outside of a home will maximize the communication range of the radios.
If other people are talking on Channel 3 at the time, please be patient and courteous. The receiving station will respond back as quickly as possible in the order that the radio messages are heard. The drill will run continuously for two hours; if radio congestion occurs on the channel, please attempt to contact the receiving station a little later in the drill. The location of the receiving station will not be disclosed until after the drill, in order to not influence the location of the participants.
The goal of this phase of the drill is to determine the range and clarity of the FRS transmissions. For those participants using FRS / GMRS combination radios, the radios must be set to the "Low" power setting to adhere to FRS regulations which do not allow operation above 500 milliwatts. This drill phase is entirely experimental, and the data will be analyzed for testing the feasibility of this network element.
Role of ham radio operators, GMRS operators, and scanner users.
Hams, GMRS operators, and scanner users are encouraged to participate in network operations and the drill. GMRS operators can directly communicate with the FRS users in their communities, and are encouraged to advise and assist the untrained public in radio-communication protocols. Ham radio operators, using their amateur radio gear, cannot legally communicate with FRS radios during non-emergency situations. In a true emergency, the FCC waives this restriction. During the drill, hams are encouraged to use their own FRS radios and apply their radio expertise to help the surrounding public communicate effectively. Hams and scanner operators can also monitor the regional FRS traffic, and test the reception range of their equipment during the drill. Please send reception and transmission reports to the special e-mail address viewable on this page: http://www.NationalSOS.com/radioreports.html
For reference, FRS Channel 1 is 462.5625 MHz and FRS Channel 3 is 462.6125 MHz.
About the National SOS Radio Network.
The National SOS Radio Network is an entirely volunteer operation, staffed by ham radio and GMRS radio operators nationwide. The National SOS Radio Network fully endorses the "Family / Neighborhood Emergency Communications" protocols as described by EMCOM at http://www.emcomus.org/commwp.html. For more information on the National SOS Radio Network and the upcoming Connecticut drill, please visit: www.NationalSOS.com. Or call Eric Knight, founder of the National SOS Radio Network, at (860) 673-2502.
# # #
National SOS Radio Network
Eric Knight
860-673-2502
E-mail Information Trackback URL: http://prweb.com/pingpr.php/TG92ZS1TdW1tLVNxdWEtRW1wdC1JbnNlLVplcm8

wesct

 

PJH

Global Database Admin
Database Admin
Joined
Aug 23, 2002
Messages
3,481
MustFomatMessages!

:)
 

PJH

Global Database Admin
Database Admin
Joined
Aug 23, 2002
Messages
3,481
Also try this:
http://www.emediawire.com/releases/2006/5/emw382228.htm

Personal Radio Association Warns the Public against the NationalSOS.com “Disaster” Plan using the Family Radio Service.

Huntingtown, MD (PRWEB) May 7, 2006 -- The Board of Directors of the Personal Radio Association today reaffirmed that it does not support the NationalSOS.com Public Emergency Network proposal announced May 4th by NationalSOS.com in its current form. “We warned NationalSOS.com regarding the lack of merit of their proposal, in particular, the lack of public planning and public education,” said Doug Smith, President of the Personal Radio Association or PRA.

Smith said, “NationalSOS.com created a great sense of urgency for us because the idea, while having some sales pizzazz, lacked the essential elements of good disaster planning. When we contacted NationalSOS.com we even provided specific ways we thought using FRS or GMRS communications could succeed. The idea is based entirely on an emotional gut-wrenching reaction to the Hurricane Katrina disaster.”

It is the opinion of the Personal Radio Association Board of Directors that the NationalSOS.com plan places the public at extreme risk. Responsible public disaster agencies in many areas, including CERT teams, are now properly training the public to use the Family Radio Service and General Mobile Radio Service in disaster preparedness programs. The Board believes CERT deserves widespread support. NationalSOS.com does not.

“The PRA Board of Directors believes the public will only benefit when expectations are set and plans are made. Neighborhoods must clearly understand their role and procedures need to be followed,” said Smith.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency created a program called Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT.) CERT is a grass-root, very local, and planned effort to organize neighbors to help neighbors in time of disaster. Amateur Radio Service volunteers and GMRS licensees are involved. Trained CERT neighbors help their neighbors when police, fire, and medical resources are not immediately available after a disaster. “The NationalSOS program is an unnecessary duplication and a disorganized version of that effort,” said Smith.

NationalSOS.com expects to use Family Radio Channel 1 (also known as GMRS interstitial 1, 462.5625 MHz). Many recently manufactured bubble-pack GMRS/FRS hybrid radios, are capable of a transmit power in excess of that allowed license-free in the Family Radio Service on FRS 1 through 7. An FCC GMRS license is required to use the higher-powered bubble-pack radios capable of power levels over one-half watt. This license requirement was apparently overlooked by NationalSOS.com.

The Personal Radio Association Board of Directors believes that CERT and the various Offices of Emergency management quite capable of organizing very-local communications programs within FCC licensing requirements. Local disaster planners and CERT organizers are the best way to organize neighborhoods and train the users of two-way radios.

FCC Rules and Regulations forbid Amateur Radio operators from using modified Amateur Radio equipment outside of the Amateur Service frequency bands. Unfortunately, the NationalSOS.com plan does not include mobilization of the current 76,000 GMRS licensees who do own equipment legal for use on GMRS and shared FRS frequencies.

“The Board’s biggest fear is that someone s going to buy an FRS or GMRS radio, ignore disaster evacuation instructions, and broadcast a plea for help but no one is going to hear their cry for help. It won’t just miraculously happen unless each neighborhood is prepared,” said Smith.

About the Personal Radio Association

Founded in February of 2005, the Personal Radio Association is a mutual-interest membership organization of Federal Communications Commission General Mobile Radio Service licensees and individuals using other FCC allocated radio services authorized by rule, such as the Family Radio Service.

The PRA's mission is to fairly and accurately represent both member and public interests in these radio services before government regulatory agencies, the various representatives of the radio manufacturing and sales industries, public or private organizations, and the public-at-large. The PRA is the first national organization in the United States ever formed to take on this role.

The PRA through education, technical leadership, and charitable intent desires to protect and preserve the growth, proper use, technical development, Federal regulation, and continued usability and effectiveness of each radio service.

Recognizing that many GMRS licensees also use their two-way radio knowledge and systems for the public welfare in time of need, the PRA supports member families sharing their systems for this purpose.
 

PJH

Global Database Admin
Database Admin
Joined
Aug 23, 2002
Messages
3,481
You mean these guys?


(yes, that is a tower mounted on a helmet)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top