• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Need Linux book info

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DaveNF2G

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I am tentatively planning to give over the third hard drive on one of my computers to Linux, so I would have a machine that can boot to Windows or Linux.

Before I get in too deep, I'd like to read up on Linux from the workstation perspective. I have no plans to run a server.

What books do you Linux experts out there recommend? How about the 7th edition of "Linux for Dummies"? What else should I read? A ham acquaintance recommended that I get Ubuntu. Is there any specific recommended reading for that flavor?

Thanks in advance.
 

SCPD

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Virginia
Hi Dave;

The biggest hassles with Linux distros is getting all of the hardware recognized. A good way to get your feet wet - and get an idea of how well your hardware is recognized "out of the box", get a bootable CD in the distro of your choice (I hear very good things about Ubuntu).

You can either order or download and burn a bootable CD ROM image. You won't have to touch your harddrives. After booting up - the system may allow mounting your FAT32 and possibly your NTFS formatted harddrives so that you can refer back to files from the Windows world.

At a minimum - the boot CD should provide at least VGA quality video. It will most likely recognize your network card and/or modem. Some software modems and NICs require downloading a driver. That means booting back to Windows to download. You may have to make several trips.

If you can get that far ... the next step would be to download and burn an installation CD ROM image. Boot that one up to install to your spare hard drive. Getting the boot loader(s) to cooperate is a pain but most installers are "wizard based" where they ask a series of questions to figure out how to complete the install.

I personally use Slackware - but that's mainly because it was one of the few distrubutions available early on (like ten + years ago). I would not recommend that to someone new - there are much friendlier distributions available now.

Good luck. You may want to take a tour of the Ubuntu web site - wiki and all.
 

cschmit

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Location
Wauwatosa, WI
Get yourself the latest version of Debian. I have installed it on lot's of systems from real old to very new and only once did I have a hardware issue. They have made it a very good distro and very easy to install. If you can install Windows you can install Debian, they have made the installer very nice now. Go to their site and get the minimum download version. Then when you go to install it will download what it needs when you install so make sure you have a internet conneciton.

I recomend the "Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 Bible" By Hill, Harris, and Vyas. I read it cover to cover and then started to install debian. It made life easy and have gone back to it many times as a referance.
 
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