• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

New Emergency Communications Are Unveiled

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ShawnCowden

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WYMT Mountain News
New Emergency Communications Are Unveiled

Sep 11, 2006 07:51 PM EDT




It's been five years since the nation was stunned by the 9-11 terrorist attacks, which brought down the World Trade Center towers and damaged the Pentagon.

As the victims and survivors are remembered across the country state officials have unveiled a new communication system to protect first responders.

For those who witnessed the horror of 9-11, whether by television or personal connection, a lot was learned that day.

Immediately, the safety of our nation was questioned by leaders and now five years later, one answer comes in an instant.

A new program called KYWINS Messenger will soon allow all emergency responding agencies to communicate with each other through instant messaging.

More than 300 first responders died in the terrorist attacks that day, partly because voice communications were cut off.

The goal is to install the system in all public safety agencies by the end of the year in effect, making us safer at home five years later and beyond.

The project was paid for by nearly $70,000 in homeland security grants provided to the center for rural development and the commonwealth office of technology.
 

ShawnCowden

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Posted on Mon, Sep. 11, 2006email thisprint this
Kentucky commemorates Sept. 11 with new first response system
By SAMIRA JAFARI
Associated Press Writer
SOMERSET — State officials and Rep. Hal Rogers marked the fifth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks this morning by rolling out a new statewide wireless network that would allow first responders to communicate from every corner of Kentucky in the event of a disaster.

Rogers, R-Ky., who heads a House committee that oversees spending for the Department of Homeland Security, said the $26 million system will help first responders, such as local police and firefighters, keep safe while working emergencies efficiently.

He said first responders dispatched to the sites of the Sept. 11 attacks were equipped with radios and other devices, but couldn’t adequately communicate with each other or their supervisors. He said first responders assisting the victims of Hurricane Katrina also had major communication problems.

“We saw that a breakdown in communication was disastrous,” Rogers said during a ceremony at the Center for Rural Development in Somerset that also was attended by Gov. Ernie Fletcher and officials from the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.

The new first responder system, dubbed “KYWINS Messenger,” relies on a state-run wireless network that allows officers to communicate via radio and instant messages from even the most remote areas in rural Kentucky using lap top computers installed in vehicles. The computer program includes a database that can retrieve background information on people and buildings.

A three-month pilot has started in Pulaski and Laurel counties in south-central Kentucky, with the rest of the state expected to be logged on by the end of the year.

Fletcher said the program would help with any type of disaster, ranging from bird flu to tornadoes.

“The anniversary of 9/11 ... reminds us of the heroic efforts of our nation’s first responders who worked together in the aftermath of the attacks to help save lives and serve their communities,” said Fletcher. “This new project will ensure our first responders have the tools and resources they need to communicate effectively while they protect Kentucky citizens.”

Adequately equipping local responders is crucial in the fight against terrorism and shouldn’t be limited to big cities, such as New York or Washington, D.C., Rogers said.

“We are at war and it’s a world war,” said Rogers. “It’s low-grade with hot spots — but it’s a world war.”

He added that major highways, railroads and other “critical infrastructure” exist in Kentucky, making it equally vulnerable to attack: “Every part of the country has vulnerabilities.”

Soon after the Sept. 11 attacks, Rogers was appointed as the first chairman of the new appropriations subcommittee on homeland security. Since then, the subcommittee has issued $217.5 billion in homeland security spending, including $117 billion to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security budget.
 
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