New Ham - 446 ?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Ghost8546

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
36
Location
Bedford, MA
I know i'm going to start a storm with this one. But I'm new, and trying to figure out the calling channels. 446.000 is this a calling channel that most people monitor, and if some needs info or help this is where they would call out to anywhere in the country with the best chance of getting someone ?

Same with the 2m calling channel ?

Chris
 

bb77

Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2012
Messages
3
In my experience, the greatest chance you have at getting a response is on a local club repeater. In some areas many people may monitor the calling channels but in my area it's used very infrequently. In fact, I don't think I've ever heard anyone on it, much less used it myself.

In short, it depends on local convention.
 

zz0468

QRT
Banned
Joined
Feb 6, 2007
Messages
6,036
No.

It's true that it's a calling channel, but realistically, very few people monitor 446.0 You might be able to raise someone in a metropolitan area, but even that's going to be hit and miss. Most hams operating on the 440 band are operating though repeaters. And in many areas, most of the 440 repeaters are closed and/or private.
 

CommJunkie

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
909
Location
FM19gt
Private or not, emergency traffic takes priority. Find me a HAM who will argue otherwise. The trick is figuring out the PL tone for that repeater.

I have 446.000 programmed into my radio, but I've never used it. I don't live close enough to another HAM to have a simplex conversation, and I would rather use my radio for QSO than for waiting for someone to call on it. Now I'm thinking I should at least put it in my scanner, in case someone does call on it.
 

Ghost8546

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
36
Location
Bedford, MA
446

OK, so its really not the nationwide emergency channel I thought it was. I do a lot of traveling in the new england area, Boston to NH, ME, VT.. I have some motorola radios that I use for both ham and police so they are not field programmable. I was looking to program a single channel that would be a good calling freq no matter what area I was in.
 

gewecke

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 29, 2006
Messages
7,473
Location
Illinois
OK, so its really not the nationwide emergency channel I thought it was. I do a lot of traveling in the new england area, Boston to NH, ME, VT.. I have some motorola radios that I use for both ham and police so they are not field programmable. I was looking to program a single channel that would be a good calling freq no matter what area I was in.


Ok, maybe try using these.

446.000 is STILL a good choice because people who are sick of all the babbling on repeaters will favor this simplex because it's quiet, 146.520 with a 6 second dtmf zero ( long tone zero) alert. Depending on where you are, 156.800 Uscg ch.16 and lastly any of the GMRS ch. because someone is almost always listening.

73,
n9zas
 

popnokick

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 21, 2004
Messages
2,511
Location
Northeast PA
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A405 Safari/7534.48.3)

Another vote for 146.520, the national 2M calling freq. most places I drive 146.520 is monitored as a "guard" channel similar to 121.50 in aviation. And the simplex range of "52" is better than 446.00 in most terrain. I keep both of them in my mobile rig, scanners, and handhelds.
 
Joined
Mar 5, 2011
Messages
30
Location
Fort Dodge, IA
In north central Iowa, a few of us monitor 52 and our local repeater on a regular basis, but if it is an actual emergency you had better just grab your cellphone!
 

Ghost8546

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
36
Location
Bedford, MA
446

I've seen it posted at lot as main calling frequency for different bands. Not as an emergency channel, but I figured if an emergency came up, people would be on the designated calling frequencies.

As i said earlier, i have a radio that i need to program permanent frequencies into, I wouldn't be able to program local repeaters in the field, so I wanted to add a channel that was common everywhere. A channel that had the best chance of reaching somone if I needed to.
 

zz0468

QRT
Banned
Joined
Feb 6, 2007
Messages
6,036
By all means, program it into your radio. It does get used. It's just not where scads of people hang out, and it's not the best place to start looking for help. The last place, maybe...
 

GSPD

Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2008
Messages
100
I second the above comment. By all means, program the National Call, don't think of it as a emergency channel, but a simplex channel for you to use. Especially running the commercial equipment that doesn't allow changes on the fly. I've programmed several simplex channels in my Motorolas for general chit-chat at hamfests or road trips with friends. Most everyone is familiar with the National Call.
 

K4APR

Member
Feed Provider
Joined
Apr 18, 2003
Messages
1,025
Location
Chesapeake, VA.
...And in many areas, most of the 440 repeaters are closed and/or private.
Sorry, I am going to call shenanigans on this statement. There was only one place I ever visited where there were closed 440 repeaters and that was in the People's Republic of California. I think you will find, in most areas, 440 repeater owners don't dare close their repeater since the users are already at the minimum. Why would they block more potential users on an already under-utilized repeater?

There is this general idea that when a new ham gets their license, 2m (VHF) is the ONLY band available or even in existence. That could not be further from the truth. I have always been a primary 440 user and had a bit of an evangelical attitude with it. I would love to see more people take advantage of 440. I think a lot of new hams buy a dual band VHF/UHF HT for their first radio and they never bother to explore the 440 side. It's a shame.
 

N5TWB

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2003
Messages
1,032
Location
Sand Springs OK
Sorry, I am going to call shenanigans on this statement. There was only one place I ever visited where there were closed 440 repeaters and that was in the People's Republic of California. I think you will find, in most areas, 440 repeater owners don't dare close their repeater since the users are already at the minimum. Why would they block more potential users on an already under-utilized repeater?

There is this general idea that when a new ham gets their license, 2m (VHF) is the ONLY band available or even in existence. That could not be further from the truth. I have always been a primary 440 user and had a bit of an evangelical attitude with it. I would love to see more people take advantage of 440. I think a lot of new hams buy a dual band VHF/UHF HT for their first radio and they never bother to explore the 440 side. It's a shame.
QFT - here in northeast OK, the primary storm spotting and NWS-reporting linked repeater system is on UHF so the band gets programmed and used by most area hams. The UHF simplex channel is encouraged as a talk-around for the spotters. Of course, some also use VHF simplex channels and repeaters for local coordination.
 

zz0468

QRT
Banned
Joined
Feb 6, 2007
Messages
6,036
Sorry, I am going to call shenanigans on this statement. There was only one place I ever visited where there were closed 440 repeaters and that was in the People's Republic of California.
A good chunk of the western U.S. operates this way. I can't speak of how it's done in your part of the world. I don't go there.

I think you will find, in most areas, 440 repeater owners don't dare close their repeater since the users are already at the minimum. Why would they block more potential users on an already under-utilized repeater?
For a variety of reasons. Many closed systems are that way because of agreements with the site owner - say, employees of a site owner who allows use of the site by employees only. Some systems are built to serve a specific group of people, say, employees of a particular sponsoring company. The Edison 220 system comes to mind.

Some systems are rather complex, and require that users all be trained control operators. Some systems are oriented around a specific common interest held by it's members. Most of these closed systems are built and operated with specific goals in mind, and general public use can sometimes go against the specific goals. Some systems are hugely expensive to operate, and the only way to continue is to require a supportive membership. I could go on and on and on why some systems end up being closed or private.

There is this general idea that when a new ham gets their license, 2m (VHF) is the ONLY band available or even in existence. That could not be further from the truth.
I agree with you here, and believe that this is the fault of the people who are bringing these new hams into the fold. Out here, I see lots of CERT organizations sposoring classes and VE test sessions, and making available via group purchases 2 meter handheld radios.

I have always been a primary 440 user and had a bit of an evangelical attitude with it. I would love to see more people take advantage of 440. I think a lot of new hams buy a dual band VHF/UHF HT for their first radio and they never bother to explore the 440 side. It's a shame.
What's a shame is that many new hams are not introduced into the wider variety of activities ham radio has to offer, and are directed into repeater operation, whether it's 2m or 440 or whatever. It's the variety that makes the hobby so interesting.
 
Joined
Dec 27, 2007
Messages
559
Location
Central AL
440 is almost completely dead in Central AL. There's a ton of operable repeaters but no traffic at all. It's really a shame. 446 may be a calling channel but I think the activity on it will reflect the general activity of 440 repeaters in your area. So for me, the chances of someone monitoring 446 in my area are pretty slim since our 440 repeaters are never used.
 

rico47635

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2007
Messages
161
I say go ahead and program the 446.000 frequency into your radio, but don't be surprised if you never hear anything on it.
 

K4APR

Member
Feed Provider
Joined
Apr 18, 2003
Messages
1,025
Location
Chesapeake, VA.
440 is almost completely dead in Central AL. There's a ton of operable repeaters but no traffic at all. It's really a shame. 446 may be a calling channel but I think the activity on it will reflect the general activity of 440 repeaters in your area. So for me, the chances of someone monitoring 446 in my area are pretty slim since our 440 repeaters are never used.
While living in the SW region of Virginia, we had a pretty healthy group of APRS users. We actually used UHF primarily for voice, to avoid the de-sense that was experienced when trying to run APRS and VHF voice in a vehicle simultaneously. UHF just really was the best answer to the problem. We also had a really nice linked UHF repeater system and it was nice to have the wide area coverage.
 
Joined
Dec 27, 2007
Messages
559
Location
Central AL
While living in the SW region of Virginia, we had a pretty healthy group of APRS users. We actually used UHF primarily for voice, to avoid the de-sense that was experienced when trying to run APRS and VHF voice in a vehicle simultaneously. UHF just really was the best answer to the problem. We also had a really nice linked UHF repeater system and it was nice to have the wide area coverage.
I wish Alabama had a statewide linked repeater system. I can see on a local club's website that there was one at some point, but I can't bring up any of the repeaters listed. Seems strange that it would've lost popularity. I know Georgia has one that seems pretty successful. 2m is pretty much it around here. People have their local repeaters for nets and ragchewing and that's about it unfortunately.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top