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New to antennas

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P__S__2

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Aug 7, 2006
Messages
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I dont have cable, so I'm looking to buy an antenna for my place,...this will be my first time buying and using one...I'm wondering do they really work? will I get channels?...

Thanks. Any info will be appreciated.

btw im located in Canada...if that helps.
 

kf4lne

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Jul 31, 2005
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Bristol, VA
I assume you are talking about a TV antenna. It depends on your location. if you are close enough to TV transmitter sites, then yes, you will get channels. if you live in the middle of nowhere like me then you probably wont get anything. it also depends on the size of antenna you get and how high you put it. Typical TV antennas are horizontally polarized, directional modified LPDA antennas. If you are surrounded by TV transmitter sites then you will need a rotor to point the antenna at the transmitter sites. If you are in an area where all of the TV signals come from one direction then you wont need a rotor and you can just mount the antenna pointed at the transmitter sites. You will want to use a good quality feed line, if your TV has 300 ohm terminals in back (doubtful) then you will want to use 300 ohm twinlead to limit the losses caused by the 300 ohm to 75 ohm adapters. if you only have a "F" connector on the back then you will want to use good quality RG6 or better 75 ohm coax, and as short of a run as you can get away with. Most TV antennas use a balanced feedpoint and you will most likeley need to use a 75-300 ohm adapter at the antenna. It wouldnt hurt to install a mast mounted amplifier if you are in a area of less than ideal coverage. if you live in an area where there are mountains or large buildings you may get ghost images, these are caused by strong reflections of the signal being received at a few microseconds later than the direct signal. basically, if you throw up a good antenna and take some care in installing it right you should be able to receive something.
 

crayon

RF Cartography Ninja
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PS2,

This website is mostly about using radio's for scanning, you know, like listening to airplanes, police, fire department, etc.

Your question is not without merits, but does seem a bit out of place. :)

Nevertheless, yes, antenna for televisions really do work. That being said, they are highly directional meaning you must point them in the general direction of where the television station has its transmitter.

If you are going to spend the money, as with most thing is life worth doing spend your money on a good quality TV antenna and coax cable to feed your TV with.

You will be glad you did.

HTH's

:)
 

P__S__2

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Messages
2
^^Thanks for the info guys...helped me alot. I'm going to see if I can get a high end antenna.

kf4lne, I live in a residential neighboorhood, so I guess there should be some transmitter sites, ill have to do more researching.thx.
 
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