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New to CB in 2017

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kesselk

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I am new to this forum, so let me introduce my self. I was into CB radio when I was younger, and always into electronics. I now live in a region that has very poor cell coverage, and thought I would get back into radios for hunting and such. Started with a cheap Cobra in my truck to play around with. Thought I would put up a base station, so I got a Galaxy 2547 and a SOLARCON A-99 recently. For a temporary setup I attached the antenna to the apple tree about 6' in the air with 50' of coax.

I was amazed at what I was hearing! I was impressed that my radio picked up the signals so well, and I was impressed that so many people still use CB!

Most of the signals I received were skip and that was cool too!
 

stingray327

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I am new to this forum, so let me introduce my self. I was into CB radio when I was younger, and always into electronics. I now live in a region that has very poor cell coverage, and thought I would get back into radios for hunting and such. Started with a cheap Cobra in my truck to play around with. Thought I would put up a base station, so I got a Galaxy 2547 and a SOLARCON A-99 recently. For a temporary setup I attached the antenna to the apple tree about 6' in the air with 50' of coax.

I was amazed at what I was hearing! I was impressed that my radio picked up the signals so well, and I was impressed that so many people still use CB!

Most of the signals I received were skip and that was cool too!
That's great. Get one of those old Super Penetrator base station antennas or Sigma 5/8 antennas and you an really get out there.
 

kesselk

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I will have to check that out, I have found out what a difference a good antenna makes. I had a fiberglass wip on my truck, and my radio would transmit but wouldn't receive. I installed a PREDATOR K-1-9 COWTOWN CB RADIO ANTENNA and the radio started working wonderfully. I was able to talk 10 miles away from my base very easily.
 

stingray327

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I will have to check that out, I have found out what a difference a good antenna makes. I had a fiberglass wip on my truck, and my radio would transmit but wouldn't receive. I installed a PREDATOR K-1-9 COWTOWN CB RADIO ANTENNA and the radio started working wonderfully. I was able to talk 10 miles away from my base very easily.
If you can get ahold of some of those old Antennas that are 5/8 wave ground plane antenna like from E-bay. They are made of aluminium and will outperform any of those other fiberglass antennas. I used to have them both and those ground plane antennas beat those Big Stik fiberglass base antennas big time in receiving and transmitting.
 

TheSpaceMann

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I am new to this forum, so let me introduce my self. I was into CB radio when I was younger, and always into electronics. I now live in a region that has very poor cell coverage, and thought I would get back into radios for hunting and such. Started with a cheap Cobra in my truck to play around with. Thought I would put up a base station, so I got a Galaxy 2547 and a SOLARCON A-99 recently. For a temporary setup I attached the antenna to the apple tree about 6' in the air with 50' of coax.

I was amazed at what I was hearing! I was impressed that my radio picked up the signals so well, and I was impressed that so many people still use CB!

Most of the signals I received were skip and that was cool too!
If you really wanna have a blast, just pick up a 3 element beam antenna and a rotor!! :)
 

jonwienke

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No, they weren't banned, and they are still available. They just cost more than thin wires stuck in a fiberglass tube. The fiberglass sections still have metal ends that could shock the user if they install the antenna next to a power line. And depending on the voltage on the power line, the fiberglass wouldn't necessarily prevent a shock anyhow.
 

KC4RAF

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As posted by 'jonwienke'; Metal antennas for base were not ever banned. Here's the general safety rules for base station antenna installations:

SITE SELECTION
Before attempting to install your antenna, think of the best place to locate
your antenna for both safety and performance. Perform the following simple
steps to determine a safe distance from wires, power lines and trees:
1. Measure the height of your antenna.
2. Add this length to the length of your tower or mast.
3. Now, double this total to obtain the minimum recommended safe
distance.

If you are unable to maintain a safe distance from power lines, select a
different location. Remember: A safe distance from power lines should be
at least twice the height of the antenna and the mast combined. If a different
location is not available, stop and obtain the help of a professional
installer.
 

kesselk

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I was playing around with my Galaxy the other day adjusting the hi power out (vr14) and I either held the mic down too long, or shorted something on the PCB because it stopped transmitting...so I felt this was a good reason to upgrade my equipment with a Ranger RCI-2995DX AM-FM-SSB-CW 10 & 12 Mtr Base Station Radio, and a Stryker SR-955HPC 10 Meter Radio for my truck.

My goal is to have a reliable 50 to 70 mile coverage around my home, and I have a lot of large hills and small mountains to contend with, but I live on the top of a large tall hill...might need an amp but will see...I would also like to be able to talk back to people in Puerto Rico and Louisiana that I can here clear as a bell but they cant here me I don't think.
 

KD0PEZ

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Oct 28, 2013
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Goldsboro, NC
They fiberglassed them so CBers wouldn't electrocute themselves trying to erect the antenna and then have it all over into the power lines while trying to hold it upright. I guess they figured CBers were too cheap to want to buy metal antennas?
 

jonwienke

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No fiberglass antennas became popular because they are cheaper than all-aluminum designs. A fiberglass sleeve has never been recognized as protection from electrical shock when installing an antenna too close to a power line.
 

kesselk

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this looks like a good one: Shooting Star CB Radio Base Station Beam Antenna Dual Polarity
 

DJ11DLN

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this looks like a good one: Shooting Star CB Radio Base Station Beam Antenna Dual Polarity
A buddy of mine had a Wilson Shooting Star back in the day (late '70s). It was a 4-element similar to the old Moonraker IV. He could talk around the world on 12 watts PEP with it. Had it up about 35' and some kind of CDE rotor on it, been too long to recall the model. Had a basically unmodified Cobra 148 and he could break most logjams with it, must have been one heck of an antenna!
 

TheSpaceMann

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If you go for an omni base antenna, you may want to look at the aluminum Sirio Tornado. Great reviews, and about $80 online!
 
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