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New to the forum, and to telephone interconnects

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Hello all,
First of all, thanks to everyone for all the valuable information on this site. I seem to stumble across this site on an annual basis, often fueled by a feeling of panic when I'm in way over my head. I always end up finding a pile of knowledge whenever I browse past.
This is my first time posting here, let alone on any forum.
I've recently inherited a system running a XPR8400 digital repeater, as well as a Teldio RBX interconnect and was hoping someone could shed some light on the configuration.
I have 2 questions:

The RBX box is connected to 2 XPR4000 radios, and not the repeater. Is this because the repeater is not compatible with the Teldio RBX? Seems like a strange way to integrate the interconnect.

My second question is, the 2 XPR4000 radios that are part of the interconnect system has one for voice, and one for synchronization. Could someone explain this to me?

Thanks for all the advice over the years gang. Happy to join the community!
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Hello all,
First of all, thanks to everyone for all the valuable information on this site. I seem to stumble across this site on an annual basis, often fueled by a feeling of panic when I'm in way over my head. I always end up finding a pile of knowledge whenever I browse past.
This is my first time posting here, let alone on any forum.
I've recently inherited a system running a XPR8400 digital repeater, as well as a Teldio RBX interconnect and was hoping someone could shed some light on the configuration.
I have 2 questions:

The RBX box is connected to 2 XPR4000 radios, and not the repeater. Is this because the repeater is not compatible with the Teldio RBX? Seems like a strange way to integrate the interconnect.

My second question is, the 2 XPR4000 radios that are part of the interconnect system has one for voice, and one for synchronization. Could someone explain this to me?

Thanks for all the advice over the years gang. Happy to join the community!
This is the first I have heard of this product and below is a link to their product page where you can download the RBX brochure.
Indeed it says you need an RF control station which is in my opinion a band aid approach to interfacing with an IP based system. Motorola requires licenses to use the IPSC and they are costly. It would be better integration to go in at the IPSC for the connection. Why your system has two, I could not say unless it is to provide a second time slot or is as you surmise to improve synch.

There are no shortage of aftermarket consoles and other interop products that claim MotoTrbo compatability yet use a control station to do the work. I have run into this in the past recommending an AVTEC with licenses and the client went cheap, and worse yet gave up the IPSC for some analog to VoIP solution and lost all the features of MotoTrbo IPSC especially the automatic roaming to go with a cheap dispatch solution.





 

N1GTL

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I put a Teldio system in years ago. It was using an XPR8400, a PC as an interface and probably an XPR4550 as a control station. I did have to contact their tech support and, as I recall, they were pretty helpful. Polite Canadians I think. I have only done the one and can't recall much except tech support being good. I've also done Zetron Model 30 interfaces and CTI makes (made?) a nice gateway interface for smartphone use. Getting off topic....sorry. Give them a call.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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The higher tier radios come with IPSC free and enabled. There are no "licenses" for IPSC, just entitlements.
I was talking about 3rd party applications and products directly utilizing the proprietary IPSC, indeed a license is required from Motorola. That is why you see most 3rd part consoles and interoperability solutions requiring a MotoTrbo control station radio.

AVTEC is one 3rd party console manufacturer who connected directly to the IPSC. I say that in past tense because I think after a while that licensing relationship changed.
 

firefive76

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I was talking about 3rd party applications and products directly utilizing the proprietary IPSC, indeed a license is required from Motorola. That is why you see most 3rd part consoles and interoperability solutions requiring a MotoTrbo control station radio.

AVTEC is one 3rd party console manufacturer who connected directly to the IPSC. I say that in past tense because I think after a while that licensing relationship changed.
Ah, understand now! Wasn’t thinking about apps.
 

N1GTL

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The Teldio did not require any repeater enhancements. Since it was simply a stand alone computer being accessed by an XPR4550 acting as a control station, the repeater has no idea what is keying it up. The company had to provide IP and port information for the computer and Teldio application. It plugged into their IP phone system (AVAYA maybe?). The company phone guy took care of forwarding an extension to the PC, the application answered it and keyed up the XPR4550.
 

Firebuff880

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Good afternoon,

@rockandrolliswar Have not seen you reply to any of this but I will add a few more pieces of information --

So, the first XPR-4000 I believe is a for the Automatic Registration Transaction (ARS) that is sent from a subscriber when it is powered on or off, the second is the audio channel for your telephone interconnect.. The Radio PBX box is unique to Teldio but if I remember conversations with them at past CPE events, it's just an Asterisk box on steroids.

For the XPR, MTR and SLR repeaters there is a Telephone Interconnect EID and you can interface to it instead of the XPR subscriber for the audio channel. You can also do a DDMS/MNIS server for the ARS. But only four vendors / developers have ever been licensed for Wireline Audio and two of the four are now owned by Motorola. That's why this is always down with control Stations.

Be careful of the RPBX as it is probably locked at an older version of Asterisk with Apt-RPT and DADHI (Zaptel) dependent builds. I have a few of these systems that I have rolled for customers (My build not Teldio) and because of the limited DAHDI / APt-RPT support in current versions have been using a much older build even on new deployments with at lot of CYA. .

There is also an older Zetron gateway product that will work with the Repeater Telephone Interconnect as well.

In both cases the Radio portion of the call is Half Duplex, the subscriber is obviously a one call at a time solution, and the Repeater EID is as well, and you need to be vary careful of Call disconnect supervision.

Lastly, I can't be certain. But I suspect others are refereeing to the Peer-To-Peer protocol that was in earlier builds of TRBO and used by C-Bridge and others, but has been retired and is not part of current ADP licenses. AVTEC now a Motorola Company has other reasons for doing things the way they do.

Good Luck -- An call Tedio they are still around..
 

Firebuff880

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From a very old document, and some of the formatting was lost --

MOTOTRBO Digital Phone Patch is a Motorola proprietary feature, and it supports the following 2 types of phone patch calls:
Individual Phone Patch Call

This allows half duplex voice communication between a radio user and a phone user. This type of call can be initiated from either end, that is, it can be initiated by the radio user or the phone user. Talkgroup Phone Patch Call

This allows half duplex voice communication between a phone user and a group of radio users (i.e. Talkgroup including All Call). This type of call can be initiated only from the phone user.

This feature is supported in Single Site/IP Site Connect (IPSC) Local Channels, IPSC Wide Area Channels (WAC), and Capacity Plus. This feature is supported in display and non-display subscribers. However, since the non-display model does not have keypad, its user can not type phone number, over dial, or access/de-access code manually; instead, these numbers need to be configured to programmable buttons.
This feature utilizes Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Analog Phone Patch (APP) boxes, and is compatible with any APP box that supports the 4-wire interface and can communicate in Half Duplex mode, for example, Zetron 30 (Worldpatch) and PL 1877A (MRTI2000). Most (if not all) APP boxes in the market support the following telephony services: Access and De-access Codes

  1. Used to wake up the APP box and prevent radio user or phone user from making un-authorized phone patch calls (Access Code)
  2. Used to terminate the phone patch call if access code is required when setting up the call (De-access code).
  3. Different access code/de-access code may be configured to have different privileges, so access/de-access code can be used to block/allow radio
  4. from performing call type (International, Long Distance, Toll, Local, 911, etc…) per radio access code. Phone Usage (Time Out Timer): the APP box will end the call once the timer expires Go ahead tone to the phone user when the radio user de-keys: this provides an indication to the phone user that he/she can starts to talk now. Connection to PSTN line directly (for example, POTS lines) or through PBX Type Approvals for Supported Countries
Instead of re-creating such services in the radio system, this feature will rely on the APP box to provide these services. The APP Box is connected to a MOTOTRBO repeater via the 4-wire interface. Since the phone patch feature utilizes APP boxes that are connected to the repeater, this feature is only available in repeater mode, not in direct mode.
Phone Call
 

JRayfield

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All of the MOTOTRBO repeaters (XPR8300, XPR8400, SLR5700 and SLR800 include(d) IP Site Connect as 'standard' (no additional charge), at least in the U.S. I think IPSC might have been an add-on option (at additional cost) in some other parts of the world (but I'm not 100% sure of that).

Subscribers (mobiles and portables) do not have, and never have had, an IPSC 'network' option. In other words, they have never had the capability of being directly connected to a network using the IPSC protocol. The IPSC option in some subscribers refers to the capability of the radio to roam between IPSC-enabled repeaters (where the repeaters send beacon transmissions for which the subscribers 'listen for'. Even if a radio does not have the IPSC option in it, that radio can still operate on an IPSC-enabled repeater system, it just can't roam between repeaters/sites.

Third-party products that interface to subscribers do so using a proprietary protocol that communicates with the radio using TCP/IP data over the USB connection between the computer/device and the radio. This is not the same are the IPSC protocol.

John Rayfield, Jr.
 
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