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NMO mount

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kjl13

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Hello.

I have been looking around for a base station nmo mount with a ground plane that works in vhf, uhf and 800mhz, but I can’t find one. It also needs to have a so239 connector(for pl259)

If anyone knows of any, let me know.

Thanks.
 

krokus

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Hello.

I have been looking around for a base station nmo mount with a ground plane that works in vhf, uhf and 800mhz, but I can’t find one. It also needs to have a so239 connector(for pl259)

If anyone knows of any, let me know.

Thanks.
You have generally opposing requests, as most things that handle 800 will have an N connector. An adapter could be used, but adds weight, and a potential failure point. (That is in addition to having all the negatives associated with the UHF connector.)

This model covers up to 512 MHz:
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbc-1649

This model covers the frequencies, but has an N connector:
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbc800lbt-7530

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mmckenna

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If you get one of the base station adapters that is designed for VHF, it'll work fine on UHF and 800MHz.
The ground radials are the concern. Ideally you want the ground radials to be at least 1/4 wavelength long. Longer will not hurt.

Getting a base station mount for VHF will give you ground radials that are around 18-19 inches long. That'll work great for VHF, and work just fine for UHF and 800.

These have UHF connectors. They'll work OK for 800MHz, but ideally you'd want an N connector, better at higher frequencies, but you may not notice a difference.
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/larsen-bsa-kit-6073
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbc-1649

This one has an N connector. This would be preferred:
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbcn-7531
 

kjl13

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If you get one of the base station adapters that is designed for VHF, it'll work fine on UHF and 800MHz.
The ground radials are the concern. Ideally you want the ground radials to be at least 1/4 wavelength long. Longer will not hurt.

Getting a base station mount for VHF will give you ground radials that are around 18-19 inches long. That'll work great for VHF, and work just fine for UHF and 800.

These have UHF connectors. They'll work OK for 800MHz, but ideally you'd want an N connector, better at higher frequencies, but you may not notice a difference.
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/larsen-bsa-kit-6073
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbc-1649

This one has an N connector. This would be preferred:
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbcn-7531
Alright, thanks. I put pl 259 connectors on lmr 400 and it would be a pain to buy more connectors for type n and then put them on it; so which would be the best option? I plan on using this antenna or one like this. Tessco - 503018




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mmckenna

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Alright, thanks. I put pl 259 connectors on lmr 400 and it would be a pain to buy more connectors for type n and then put them on it; so which would be the best option? I plan on using this antenna or one like this. Tessco - 503018
If putting the correct connector on is a problem, then just stick with the PL259. If you can swap it out to an "N" connector, that would be a good idea.
N connectors perform better at higher frequencies. They also have some waterproofing as part of their design. PL259's do not.
Either way, you'll need to pay close attention to making sure the outdoor connection (N or PL-259) is very well waterproofed.

As for the antenna, that should work. Not an outstanding performer on VHF, it's just 1/4 wave, but should be an improvement over having no external antenna.
 

WRCM

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If you get one of the base station adapters that is designed for VHF, it'll work fine on UHF and 800MHz.
The ground radials are the concern. Ideally you want the ground radials to be at least 1/4 wavelength long. Longer will not hurt.

Getting a base station mount for VHF will give you ground radials that are around 18-19 inches long. That'll work great for VHF, and work just fine for UHF and 800.

These have UHF connectors. They'll work OK for 800MHz, but ideally you'd want an N connector, better at higher frequencies, but you may not notice a difference.
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/larsen-bsa-kit-6073
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbc-1649

This one has an N connector. This would be preferred:
https://www.theantennafarm.com/catalog/laird-technologies-mbcn-7531
This is the best answer for what you're looking for.
 

kjl13

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If putting the correct connector on is a problem, then just stick with the PL259. If you can swap it out to an "N" connector, that would be a good idea.
N connectors perform better at higher frequencies. They also have some waterproofing as part of their design. PL259's do not.
Either way, you'll need to pay close attention to making sure the outdoor connection (N or PL-259) is very well waterproofed.

As for the antenna, that should work. Not an outstanding performer on VHF, it's just 1/4 wave, but should be an improvement over having no external antenna.
Well, I already have an antenna up there. This antenna is for a Motorola XTVA, so I can just throw an XTS in it.
If having only one antenna is not the way to go, I can do three antennae (it will just be a pain to mount them all and also cost more money.)

Let me know of your recommendations and I will look into how much it would cost.

I was looking into a triplexer with three antennas, so I can break it up by band.

Regards,
Kyle
 
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mmckenna

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No, that antenna shouldn't be an issue if you've got a good signal to work with. I wouldn't mess with anything until you get it all put together and tested. If it works for you, then that is all that matters.
 

kjl13

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No, that antenna shouldn't be an issue if you've got a good signal to work with. I wouldn't mess with anything until you get it all put together and tested. If it works for you, then that is all that matters.
Well, having a ground plane made for vhf won’t really do too good. Is there something bad about using a triplexer?

Also, I am in a valley surrounded by 200-300 Ft hills. If you think it willl do fine, I guess I will do that, but I want to make sure I can make it the best I can.
 

WRCM

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Well, having a ground plane made for vhf won’t really do too good. Is there something bad about using a triplexer?

Also, I am in a valley surrounded by 200-300 Ft hills. If you think it willl do fine, I guess I will do that, but I want to make sure I can make it the best I can.
If you're surrounded by hills, you don't want antenna gain. That's counterproductive because you will just be shooting a narrower, stronger beam into those hills instead of a wider pattern that can maybe find a way out of the valley. My situation is the same.
 

kjl13

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I mean, I get repeaters 40-50 miles away because of the height of their sites. So.... are you recommending something like a yagi.


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mmckenna

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The ground plane, as long as it is 1/4 wave or larger, won't degrade performance. I have a 1/4 wave antenna on top of my truck, and there's much more than 18 inches of ground plane underneath it.

As for antenna gain, as WRCM said, lower gain antennas can work in your favor. I'm in a valley also, and mostly in mountainous areas. 1/4 wave works well. Higher gain antennas can work against you in some applications.

I fixed a repeater system that had been installed by someone else a few months ago. The original installer had put up a 6dB gain antenna on a system that was on a very steep mountain side. The customer was having coverage issues. Putting up a zero dB gain antenna improved coverage by quite a bit.
 

mmckenna

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Good tri-plexers can be expensive. Additional cabling, additional antennas, plus you have to mount all those guys with ground planes, waterproofing the connectors, etc.

If the tri-band antenna works, then go with that.
 
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