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NMO mounts on a 2017 Premium Tahoe with sliding sunroof?

mmckenna

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Not on a Tahoe, but on a Silverado, one NMO mount with a VHF 1/4 wave whip.

You need to consider the size of the ground plane you need for each antenna and place accordingly.
Sun roof installs can be a pain, but most of the modern NMO mounts are pretty low profile on the underside. Your best bet, however, is to go far enough back that it's not an issue.
 

W0JOG

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There are brakets in an "L" shape that Larssen and others sell which allow you to do a sturdy mount along the side opening of the hood that will let you put quarter wave or similar NMO based antenna mounts on the side of the hood and run the coax along the inside to the firewall and find an opening to get you into the inside. Three screws into the side lip of the fender/hood opening hold it securely in place and they're out of site.

Same brackets will work on trunk lid if the vehicle has one available and you then can route coax inside along the back seat and door lip to the front. Any professional installer can explain if necessary.

de W0JOG
 

eorange

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Genuinely curious: why did you have someone take your pic while you were drilling the hole (unless that's not you)?
 

ra7850

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Genuinely curious: why did you have someone take your pic while you were drilling the hole (unless that's not you)?
I didn't drill the holes, a Motorola installed near me did the installation. To be honest, I have always wanted to use drilled NMO mounts on the numerous vehicles that I've owned over the years and never had the guts to do it. Even with him doing it I was still concerned. But after seeing it done, I wished I done it sooner. The installer drilled 2 holes, installed 2 mounts connected antennas, routed the cables to front console, terminated the connectors in less than 45 minutes. He didn't even take the headliner down. In this case, experience was what I was looking for. besides, I knew at some point someone else would ask about the placement with a full glass sunroof and wanted to have a reference.

Robert
 

mmckenna

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I really need 6 mounts. I was thinking of going up both sides, too. I wonder how much room is in there. I *KNEW* I shouldn't have gotten that darn sunroof....
You'll have to get creative with the installation, but I'd have no problems tackling it. I've done a few vehicles with sun roofs before. It's not impossible.

Like I said, you'll need to consider the ground plane needs for each antenna, and the amount of separation you need between each antenna. Not hard to do, just plan it out on paper before you start. Also, consider multiband antennas to combine as much as you can.

I'd avoid the sides, as that will give you an awful ground plane. It can also expose occupants to high RF levels.
Bracket mounts are an option, but it still gives you an awful ground plane and puts the antennas down below the cab, that's going to result in really poor radiation patterns and shielding.

Look towards the rear of the vehicle. Should be plenty of room back there. Loosen the rear most edge of the head liner and drop it enough to look up there with a flashlight. You should see plenty of room to work.

In front of the sun roof is always an option if you have an antenna that doesn't need a large ground plane (700/800/900MHz) and transmit power is low.

Working around them is always a bit of a challenge, but it can be done. Don't cut corners and don't be in a rush. Many agencies pack a lot of antennas into a small space, just takes some careful planning.
 

W0JOG

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1. Don't scare yourself about radiation. Not enough there in a lifetime to hurt you, experience will show.

2. Don't worry about radiation patterns on a vehicle. With your eyes closed, you'll never know the difference between a rooftop and hood/trunk mounted antenna(s) in practical use.

de W0JOG
 

mmckenna

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1. Don't scare yourself about radiation. Not enough there in a lifetime to hurt you, experience will show.

2. Don't worry about radiation patterns on a vehicle. With your eyes closed, you'll never know the difference between a rooftop and hood/trunk mounted antenna(s) in practical use.

de W0JOG
If this is for amateur use, sure, don't get hung up on human exposure, but you passengers may not share that same attitude. If it's commercial/LMR/Public Safety, then there are rules that need to be paid attention to. Cavalier attitudes that fly in the ham world don't get off the ground on the professional side.

Some vehicle electronics won't like high RF fields. Having nothing but glass between the antenna and the electronics isn't going to help.
Some vehicle electronics spew out a lot of noise, and having metal between the noisemaker and the antenna is just good planning.
Drilling holes in the roof of the vehicle is serious and takes some thought. It shouldn't be approached as a "punch a hole anywhere and stuff a mount in". The right way to do it is plan out the locations based on ground plane need, interaction between the antennas, cable routing, and sun roof location.

If you are going to be running any sort of cellular BDA, it will require separation between the outside antenna and the inside antenna. You need to plan those installations out very carefully, and often test the locations before making them permanent. If the BDA starts to self oscillate, it'll shut down and be totally useless.

If it's a nice vehicle and you plan on keeping it for a while, take the time to do it right. It's not hard to do. There is no reason it needs to look like crap. Professional looking installations will not only look better, but work better. No need to rush.

If looks and performance don't matter, then slap a bunch of mag mounts on it and go have a beer.
 

FFPM571

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It's the old ham mentality here... Lets use 1960's thinking in modern environment. Not let's trust the professionals who have worked on modern vehicles with modern technology...
 

W0JOG

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What does ham radio have to do with it? Or "modern technology?" Or "professionals", of which I have been a long time.I thought this site existed to help people.
 

FFPM571

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What does ham radio have to do with it? Or "modern technology?" Or "professionals", of which I have been a long time.I thought this site existed to help people.
The information you are giving out is outdated. Sticking antennas where ever they fit is not optimal for performance. As a professional you would know that right?
 

slowmover

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Mobile Install Bible

is what I’ve learned the most from having now done (6) big truck and (1) SUV.

Installation work by @mmckenna has been an addition to that.

Search out pictures of componentry used for public service radio where he’s attempting to show the how & what of the rest of the installation.

I wouldn’t say he & I are buds, we’ve “argued” a few times. May again. (I need to be better at phrasing).

But there’s not anyone here can’t take a page from the guy makes his living that way (including so-called radio techs can’t be bothered to stick their neck out).

A difficulty I understand as to incomprehension, offense and contempt with those who think they know how to drive. (The facts are otherwise).

Nothing exceeds antenna mount & placement.

The rest is huff & puff.

.
 

slowmover

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I didn't drill the holes, a Motorola installed near me did the installation. To be honest, I have always wanted to use drilled NMO mounts on the numerous vehicles that I've owned over the years and never had the guts to do it. Even with him doing it I was still concerned. But after seeing it done, I wished I done it sooner. The installer drilled 2 holes, installed 2 mounts connected antennas, routed the cables to front console, terminated the connectors in less than 45 minutes. He didn't even take the headliner down. In this case, experience was what I was looking for. besides, I knew at some point someone else would ask about the placement with a full glass sunroof and wanted to have a reference.

Robert
I agree wholly with your sentiments and reasoning beforehand.

Teach a man to fish, . . . .

.
 

AK9R

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It can also expose occupants to high RF levels.
Assuming this is an amateur radio antenna installation, FCC rules (§97.13(c)) require that you do an RF exposure evaluation of your station. There's an RF exposure calculator on the ARRL's website that may help you determine your compliance with the rules.
 
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