North Carolina SLED Frequencies

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daj0kker

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Anyone know what frequencies the SLED people use and willing to share?

Much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Dave
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Grog

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SLED is the South Carolina State Law Enforcement Division, are you wanting infor on them or another statewide agency in NC?


Clicking on the "database" link above can help in searching what/who you are looking for.
 

yardbird

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As far as NC SBI goes they are on the State Viper 800 Mhz System.

SBI had some Low Band Frequencies years ago, but when they decided to abandon their Low Band channels the Highway Patrol aquired the channels for expansion.

Hope this helps

David
 

Grog

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The lowband thing must be before my time, but I do know they used to be very active on the statewide VHF network as well. JeffM can chine in better on that since he heavily monitors that network.
 

yardbird

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You are right, Forgot about that

SBI and Wildlife officers share the same highband frequencies when needed.

Matter a fact if you program the three output channels in a scanner, you will here the automated time check and location being broadcasted on the hour.

As far as the Low Band channels go. I think that SHP Channels 17 and 18 were the old SBI channels.

Just for your general info, Anson County is now being dispatched on Channels 13 and 14 instead of 17 and 18 due to better reception issues.

Same goes for Davie County which is now dispatched on 9 and 10, instead of 15 and 16

Hope this helps

David
 

CCHLLM

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That would be a good guess about the former uses of the low band freqs mentioned, but I can't remember what was what.

In the beginning.....only a few years before I went to work for the NCSHP, there was only 1 NC channel: 42.620 simplex statewide. Troops ran A thru F.
VA was on 42.860 simplex.

Williamston (A), E-town (B), Raleigh (C), and Greensboro (D) all had 3KW transmitters on this freq. Salisbury (E) had the local site at Salisbury and a 70 MHz linked site at Poore's Knob in Wilkes Co. Asheville (F) had the local at Asheville, and linked sites at Mt Meadows, Wine Springs, Chambers Mtn, Soco Gap, and the mother of them all on the top of the observation tower at Mt Mitchell. Output power was "only" 330 watts, but the antenna was 70 feet above the 6684 foot ground level at the peak.

Later in the 70s, another similar power output station was added at Mt Gibbs (Clingman' Peak) southeast of the observation tower site to cover the holes that the observation tower site couldn't "see." Actually it was more that the observation tower site couldn't always hear the mobiles to the SE in Troop F, and since the newly installed state microwave site was already on Mt Gibbs, adding another linked site was a cake walk. As for the mobiles hearing the Mitchell site, you didn't need anything but a 1 iron and a resonant filling to hear the Mitchell site. Hell, Williamston and Etown comm centers could copy Mitchell anytime of day when monitoring channel 1, and mobile reception of the Mitchell site was normal on the Outer Banks at night.

Troop A communications also had two sub stations (1/4 KW "low" power) that operated each day 7AM to 11PM. They were Elizabeth City and New Bern. Troop B also had two sub stations that operated the same hours. They were Fayetteville and Wilmington.

Then came semi-duplex operation in NC with channel 2, 42.780, as a mobile-to-base freq, and 42.620 remaining the base-to-mobile and car-to-car channel.

VA added 42.88 simplex. Or maybe it was the other way around....whatever.

NC added some more 42 MHz freqs for SBI, some for DOC, and some for ALE. Most of these are what now make up the current SHP channel selections.

In the late 60s came channels 3 and 4. Troop A, B, D, and F were on 1 and 2, C and E were on 3 and 4. More remote receiver and transmitter sites were added

As UHF and 70 MHz links were added, E-City, New Bern, Fayetteville, and Wilmington comm stations were phased out as no longer necessary.

As the population and corresponding traffic increased and more roads were built, troop zones were re-aligned and new ones added, and troopers and frequencies and comm sites and comm centers were added. Channels 5 thru 8 were added.

As the need for more SHP freqs came into play, some of the the old comm center-to-comm center VHF high band repeater links and freqs were converted to a high band repeater system, and some were used with low to high crossband car repeaters for troopers to use outside the car. Then the agencies that had been using exclusive low band freqs were assigned new radio freqs, and some of the low band freqs were placed into SHP use.

PL was added to the system in the late 80s.

There's more, but it's time to crash for the night.
 
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KD4UXQ

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That would be a good guess about the former uses of the low band freqs mentioned, but I can't remember what was what.

In the beginning.....only a few years before I went to work for the NCSHP, there was only 1 NC channel: 42.620 simplex statewide. Troops ran A thru F.
VA was on 42.860 simplex.

Williamston (A), E-town (B), Raleigh (C), and Greensboro (D) all had 3KW transmitters on this freq. Salisbury (E) had the local site at Salisbury and a 70 MHz linked site at Poore's Knob in Wilkes Co. Asheville (F) had the local at Asheville, and linked sites at Mt Meadows, Wine Springs, Chambers Mtn, Soco Gap, and the mother of them all on the top of the observation tower at Mt Mitchell. Output power was "only" 330 watts, but the antenna was 70 feet above the 6684 foot ground level at the peak.

Later in the 70s, another similar power output station was added at Mt Gibbs (Clingman' Peak) southeast of the observation tower site to cover the holes that the observation tower site couldn't "see." Actually it was more that the observation tower site couldn't always hear the mobiles to the SE in Troop F, and since the newly installed state microwave site was already on Mt Gibbs, adding another linked site was a cake walk. As for the mobiles hearing the Mitchell site, you didn't need anything but a 1 iron and a resonant filling to hear the Mitchell site. Hell, Williamston and Etown comm centers could copy Mitchell anytime of day when monitoring channel 1, and mobile reception of the Mitchell site was normal on the Outer Banks at night.

Troop A communications also had two sub stations (1/4 KW "low" power) that operated each day 7AM to 11PM. They were Elizabeth City and New Bern. Troop B also had two sub stations that operated the same hours. They were Fayetteville and Wilmington.

Then came semi-duplex operation in NC with channel 2, 42.780, as a mobile-to-base freq, and 42.620 remaining the base-to-mobile and car-to-car channel.

VA added 42.88 simplex. Or maybe it was the other way around....whatever.

NC added some more 42 MHz freqs for SBI, some for DOC, and some for ALE. Most of these are what now make up the current SHP channel selections.

In the late 60s came channels 3 and 4. Troop A, B, D, and F were on 1 and 2, C and E were on 3 and 4. More remote receiver and transmitter sites were added

As UHF and 70 MHz links were added, E-City, New Bern, Fayetteville, and Wilmington comm stations were phased out as no longer necessary.

As the population and corresponding traffic increased and more roads were built, troop zones were re-aligned and new ones added, and troopers and frequencies and comm sites and comm centers were added. Channels 5 thru 8 were added.

As the need for more SHP freqs came into play, some of the the old comm center-to-comm center VHF high band repeater links and freqs were converted to a high band repeater system, and some were used with low to high crossband car repeaters for troopers to use outside the car. Then the agencies that had been using exclusive low band freqs were assigned new radio freqs, and some of the low band freqs were placed into SHP use.

PL was added to the system in the late 80s.

There's more, but it's time to crash for the night.

WX4CBH,

This little bit of history is something I've been wondering about for a while.

What frequency/channel was used for NCHP in Iredell from 63 to 65 and then Wilkes from 65-70? I'm sure it changed some during that time. I'm familiar with most everything in use starting in 1973 when I began monitoring my father who is a retired Trooper. E3 & E6 was on 3&4 for a very long time until sometime in the 80's. My father really doesn't remember much about channels in use way back then. I remember his first radio call was not preceeded by a Troop letter either, it was just 600 something. He does remember that and I'll have to ask him again what it was.

He was first assigned in Iredell in 1963. He left the Highway Patrol in I think late 1964 for a civilian job and came back 6 months later and was assigned to Wilkes until he requested a transfer in 1970 to Rowan to get closer to home which is Cabarrus. He has a lot of good stories about bootlegging in Iredell and Wilkes from the 60's. Lot's of chases which I wish I had been able to monitor back then.

Thanks,

Harold KD4UXQ
 

CCHLLM

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SHP freqs in Iredell in 60s

Salisbury had only channel 1 until the 60s when 2 was added, then used 3 and 4 troop wide when those were added in the mid 60s. 5 thru 8 were added to the state low band plan in the late 70s. IIRC, Iredell was one of the counties on 5 and 6 when that took place and the troops were re-aligned and Newton was added as a comm center in that part of the world. Newton began dispatching NWNC at that time and took over the Poore's knob site. When Troop H was formed to manage the Greater Charlotte area and Monroe got a comm center, more frequencies were added, more sites were added, and everything west of Raleigh got re-aligned and the whole state was divvied up channelwise.
 
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KD4UXQ

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be kind of interesting to hear some of his bootlegging stories...
They are just about anything you can imagine. One he tells about was chasing one up a riverbed until both cars lost their oil pans. He has pictures of a large moonshine still the ABC officers, now known as ALE and some troopers raided and busted up. That still was using sugar stolen from a school or a warehouse for scholls, not sure which, and car radiators pulling water from what looks like a swampy pond. Must have been some really nasty lead laden moonshine.
 

KD4UXQ

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Salisbury had only channel 1 until the 60s when 2 was added, then used 3 and 4 troop wide when those were added in the mid 60s. 5 thru 8 were added to the state low band plan in the late 70s. IIRC, Iredell was one of the counties on 5 and 6 when that took place and the troops were re-aligned and Newton was added as a comm center in that part of the world. Newton began dispatching NWNC at that time and took over the Poore's knob site. When Troop H was formed to manage the Greater Charlotte area and Monroe got a comm center, more frequencies were added, more sites were added, and everything west of Raleigh got re-aligned and the whole state was divvied up channelwise.
Thanks much for the recap!
 

jeffmulter

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>> ... but I do know they used to be very active on the statewide VHF network as well. JeffM can chine in better on that since he heavily monitors that network.


I can't say that I ever heard SBI units using the WRC channels as if it was their primary communications mode.

On occasion - in the past - they would use a WRC repeater to raise another agent on the radio, then go to cell of some other means to converse.

There were occasions when they would stay on the WRC Concord repeater while enroute to an active call, for the purposes of coordinating with other responding agents.

I have also heard SBI units talk with NCHP dispatchers in the past on 154.680 to run a registration lookup.

It has been a long time, though, since I've caught any activity by SBI on the WRC or NCHP channels.
 

Grog

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Well I figured if anyone knew about it, it'd be you Jeff :D


Any of my knowledge is quite dated as I admit to not listening to any of the VHF frequencies that much since I moved to this end of the state in 99. From 92-99 I know they used the 159.285 down in Delco quite often back and forth, also calling Raleigh on that to run tags. I heard them a few times on the 154.680 repeater talking to SHP, and Brunswick County fire many times to talk with the county dispatch center.


Between 159.285, 154.680, 159.240 (marine fisheries) and assorted other things, VHF hi band was the thing to listen to for lots of state comms at the time.
 

Grog

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Too bad there is not as much VHF around, and I really wish they would have held off on the narrowband work here in D12. It sounds ok on a radio that can really do it, but on a radio or scanner that can't handle the bandwidth it sounds rather low.

I'm only a few miles from the Gaston County repeater, but when I lived in Lincolnton there were times where the signal just didn't sound as strong as the old wideband repeater did. Gaston County EMS/fire is the same way, just don't have the signal they used to have before the change.



Is that how people get concinced that 800mhz trunking is better? By making the VHF/UHF conventional stuff sound horrible? :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
 

CCHLLM

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It doesn't always sound OK on a radio that does narrowband either. I'm using a Spectra Astro with 12 watt audio and channels programmed both wide and narrow so I can switch between them when necessary. There are times in D3 and D12 that I have to crank the volume up to about 75% in order to even pull the modulation out of the ambient noise level in the truck, and other times it's fine, but my tech experience tells me that's level adjustment problems in the system equipment.

The problem with narrow band lies in the audio contour of narrow band compared to wide band. Less bandwidth means some portions of the audio range you're used to hearing in wide band get cut out. That gives the narrowband audio less "depth", not that comm radios have a "high fidelity" sound anyway, and less depth means a distinct difference in audio quality. This is why the expensive spread has "audio companding" to try and restore some of that lost audio quality. There are some analog 800 trunking systems that sound as good as any wide band system, but then we're talking analog and correctly set levels instead of half rate digital vocoding, but there lies another argument. Digital audio really does leave a lot to be desired, but that ain't what this thread was about to begin with, so I guess I'm OT.
 
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CCHLLM

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The map hasn't changed, but the freqs listed on the database are definitely not all correct.
D1 151.4750 PL 88.5
D2 151.3550 PL 88.5
D3 151.1900 PL 77.0
D4 151.2650 PL 100.0
D5 151.3100 PL 88.5
D6 151.4750 PL 131.8
D7 151.2050 PL 100.0
D8 151.2800 PL 131.8
D9 151.1750 PL 88.5, 151.205 PL 88.5, 151.340 PL 88.5 depending on area in D9
D10 151.4450 PL 131.8
D11 151.1600 PL 151.4
D12 151.3625 PL 94.8
D13 151.2200 PL 241.8

D9 has mostly high altitude repeater sites to cover the valleys and coves, so freqs and sites are laid out in order to reduce adjacent state and intrastate interference. Just load 'em all in and go.
 
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