NTIA DATABASE

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W2MR

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Is there an NTIA frequency database similar to the FCC's anywhere on-line?
 

nd5y

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Is there an NTIA frequency database similar to the FCC's anywhere on-line?
That information is located in a database called GMF (Government Master File) which is has been classified confidential since about 1983 and is not available to the public. They are planning to replace it with Federal Spectrum Management System (FSMS).
 
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ecps92

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Correct. The pages describe what Spectrum XXI are.
Those who have been trained would be given user ID's and Passwords to access it.

And as listed below, it says who those likely would be.
frequency Managers of Civilian, DoD and Federal Agencies

Hobbyists are not listed


SPECTRUM XXI​
is a client/server software
system, interconnected through a
Wide Area Network (WAN), that provides
frequency managers with a single
information system that addresses spectrum
management automation requirements.
The extended connectivity of Spectrum
Management offices includes all levels
of spectrum management including

civilian, military and federal.

I don't see a database.
Which part of this can I access online?

Randy
 

lep

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I used the Freedom of Information Act in 1976 to download the GMF. When my request was received by IRAC they notified member Agencies who did not object within the time constraints of the Act. Afterwards, the FBI objected on behalf of DOJ and the SAC of a nearby town came to my house to get the list microfiche (okay, this was a Long time ago). I had paid $320 fee for duplication, they went to the FBI RA in my town, typed a 'hold harmless' letter (I had done nothing wrong by filing a FOIA request), and refunded my $320 in Cash (not a check, they drew it from petty cash).

It was subsequent to this that they Exempted the GMF from FOIA by classifying it as Confidential.
The FOIA and microfiche were for my hobbyist use and not related to my professional work. Just as a matter of interest, in my work I held a TS clearance with access to a number of compartmented tags.
While talking with the SAC (and his ASAC who came with him) they telephoned an Asst Director at HQ to get permission to refund my payment. They were very polite and respectful, I suspect they were on shaky legal grounds in taking the data back but I did not make a "Federal case" out of it.

Therefore, the correct date for classifying the GMF was not "1982 or so" as someone posted, the copy I had in1976 was NOT classified at all but was subsequently "sanitized" so they could eventually return it to me. After getting the sanitized version, I had the regional Eastman Kodak office duplicate it and sold it to Bob Grove of Monitoring Times who used to marketed it with no reference to where he got it in the first place (which was from me!).
 

nr2d

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Here is an excerpt from the NITA manual referencing requesting Fed Gov frequency information:

"11.5 REQUESTING FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT INFORMATION
1. A large amount of information related to federal spectrum management is available on NTIA’s website at
Home Page | NTIA. For example, the website includes the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management (NTIA Manual), the U.S. Frequency Allocation Chart, spectrum studies and reports, and NTIA’s spectrum filings before the Federal Communications Commission. Information not available on the website may be available through a Freedom of Information Act request.
2. A Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to NTIA, U.S. Department of Commerce, should include the
following:
• The request must be in writing and can be submitted by mail, e-mail, or fax.
• A statement that the request is being made under the Freedom of Information Act must be included in
your letter.
• Mark the envelope "Freedom of Information Act Request."
• If you are making your request by e-mail, please include a mailing address.
• Please also include a daytime telephone number should we need to contact you for clarification.
3. Send your request to:
FOIA Officer
National Telecommunications and Information Administration
U.S. Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Room 4713
Washington, DC 20230
E-mail address: eFOIA@ntia.doc.gov
Fax number: (202) 501-8013
Telephone number: (202) 482-1816
4. Please describe as best as possible the NTIA records you are requesting. In your description, please include information regarding the subject matter, date, and any other information you feel will assist us in our search for the records."

As stated previously I seriously doubt you can request the entire GMF data base.
 

prcguy

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If you go through all the hoops described, you will get a list of frequencies but I'll bet some of it will be blocked out with a reference to national security. Unless your privy to certain information you just won't be able to get it. Or you will never know what is missing from the list.
prcguy


Here is an excerpt from the NITA manual referencing requesting Fed Gov frequency information:

"11.5 REQUESTING FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT INFORMATION
1. A large amount of information related to federal spectrum management is available on NTIA’s website at
Home Page | NTIA. For example, the website includes the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management (NTIA Manual), the U.S. Frequency Allocation Chart, spectrum studies and reports, and NTIA’s spectrum filings before the Federal Communications Commission. Information not available on the website may be available through a Freedom of Information Act request.
2. A Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to NTIA, U.S. Department of Commerce, should include the
following:
• The request must be in writing and can be submitted by mail, e-mail, or fax.
• A statement that the request is being made under the Freedom of Information Act must be included in
your letter.
• Mark the envelope "Freedom of Information Act Request."
• If you are making your request by e-mail, please include a mailing address.
• Please also include a daytime telephone number should we need to contact you for clarification.
3. Send your request to:
FOIA Officer
National Telecommunications and Information Administration
U.S. Department of Commerce
1401 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Room 4713
Washington, DC 20230
E-mail address: eFOIA@ntia.doc.gov
Fax number: (202) 501-8013
Telephone number: (202) 482-1816
4. Please describe as best as possible the NTIA records you are requesting. In your description, please include information regarding the subject matter, date, and any other information you feel will assist us in our search for the records."

As stated previously I seriously doubt you can request the entire GMF data base.
 

lep

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Of course you can request anything you desire, whether it will be granted is another matter. Records under FOIA are generally not Free, the government is entitled to charge you the cost of duplicating the records. In the example I cite, the cost of the entire GMF microfiche was $320 which I paid and NTIA sent me the entire GMF. It was only 2 weeks after I received it that DOJ notified IRAC they wished to object to granting my request. Since I already had it, they tasked the FBI SAC from my nearest Field Office to come and see me and negotiate the return of the data. Since it is a massive amount of data including freqs, link locations and call signs (recall the calls are not assigned by FCC but by NTIA from US allocations) I had only begun to scratch the surface of exploring the data.
The data is now online, classified Confidential, and is available to authorized users including certain contractors. Much of the data can be declassified and made available to requestors however, the agency is entitled to charge for the work of separating the data. In most cases of which I am aware the Mystery is mostly in the minds of the public, the data is pretty common for anyone who is involved in planning complex modern communication systems.
 

bailly2

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re: ntia database

so many nacs have been identified. there isn't too much we don't know right?
also, if your an authorized user that is able to see the ntia database, wouldn't it just say something like justice department pool, and not identify the subagency? thanks
 

ecps92

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Lat, Lon, Power, address Lots of info, if only....................

so many nacs have been identified. there isn't too much we don't know right?
also, if your an authorized user that is able to see the ntia database, wouldn't it just say something like justice department pool, and not identify the subagency? thanks
 

lep

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No, the data has the details of each and every station similar to the FCC database of non-government stations.
 

natedawg1604

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I found it a long time ago, and anyone can access the frequencies with two simple steps:

1. Find a tall hill that overlooks potential federal radio users, and then find a quiet place where you can listen to headphones undisturbed;
2. Put your scanner in "SEARCH MODE" and record the results. (NOTE: Unless you procured your scanner from the Department of Defense, it probably won't know the difference between "classified" and "un-classified", lol)...

-Nate
 

ecps92

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Only works if/when they are transmitting :cool:

I found it a long time ago, and anyone can access the frequencies with two simple steps:

1. Find a tall hill that overlooks potential federal radio users, and then find a quiet place where you can listen to headphones undisturbed;
2. Put your scanner in "SEARCH MODE" and record the results. (NOTE: Unless you procured your scanner from the Department of Defense, it probably won't know the difference between "classified" and "un-classified", lol)...

-Nate
 
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