Obviously Nothing Is Sacred

Status
Not open for further replies.

trumpetman

Member
Database Admin
Joined
Mar 24, 2007
Messages
1,739
Location
Charlotte, NC
I'm not sure I follow with your comment gewecke, the only digital format currently supported in scanners is P25, and I didn't see any reference to that.

Can you elaborate please?

Thanks!
 

datainmotion

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 9, 2001
Messages
2,276
Location
Colorado
Looks like this is just is about a consolidation / reorg of their existing enroute freqs for analog voice?

Thanks for link - I printed the new map :)
 

gewecke

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 29, 2006
Messages
7,473
Location
Illinois
I'm not sure I follow with your comment gewecke, the only digital format currently supported in scanners is P25, and I didn't see any reference to that.

Can you elaborate please?

Thanks!
Sure. It doesn't mean you can't try! I've received a lot that wasn't listed a P25, turned out it was mixed mode. Thinking outside the box sometimes works.

73,
n9zas
 

AirScan

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 13, 2007
Messages
504
Obviously Nothing Is Sacred
I don't get it ? What is so "Sacred" about ARINC re-organizing their voice frequencies ?

I've received a lot that wasn't listed a P25, turned out it was mixed mode.
Can you elaborate on what you are talking about here ?
 

Token

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
2,151
Location
Mojave Desert, California, USA
I'm not sure I follow with your comment gewecke, the only digital format currently supported in scanners is P25, and I didn't see any reference to that.

Can you elaborate please?

Thanks!
I took that to mean a digitally tuned scanner, instead of a crystal controlled scanner. Then you just reprogram the new freqs. Pretty much the same way I took the "digital radio" portion of that linked page, new, digitally tuned radios, vs old school crystal and VFO/VXO/VCO tuned.

Note it also says "The digital technology also allowed ARINC to make the overnight transition with minimal service interruption". As if past tense, but I still am not hearing digital signals on the VHF air band (other than ACARS and such. So, I am pretty sure they mean digital radios as in digitally controlled, not digital modulation modes.

T!
 

RobKB1FJR

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
204
Location
Grafton, MA
I can understand the interest in AIRINC for the hardcore aviation monitor. It's not like it's the TRACON/Tower frequencies nation wide.
 

KE5TLF

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2005
Messages
1,559
Location
MS Gulf Coast
131.175 blows my hair back on close call fairly regularly and has done so as recently as yesterday, so, much ado about nothing it would seem...
 
D

DaveNF2G

Guest
The "digital" communications referenced in the article refer to ACARS.
 

AirScan

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 13, 2007
Messages
504
The "digital" communications referenced in the article refer to ACARS.
It seems pretty clear they are talking about voice here and not ACARS ....

"The network restructuring is the final phase of a system-wide technology refresh, including digital connectivity and replacing analog radios with state-of-the-art digital transceivers. The digital connectivity and radios have demonstrated greater voice clarity, improved reliability, and real-time network monitoring. The digital technology also allowed ARINC to make the overnight transition with minimal service interruption."

I'm not sure what they mean exactly by "state-of-the-art digital transceivers" ? If the audio has been switched to digital would this not also require the aircraft to be switched as well ? This sounds like it would be a huge expense to the industry and I've never heard of any aircraft being modified ? I'm guessing the "digital" is refering to the signal processing capability of the radios and not the actual voice audio transmissions ?
 
D

DaveNF2G

Guest
There has been, and will be, no change of aircraft voice communications to digital within the forseeable future. The technology is not up to the safety demands of serving mobiles moving at hundreds of miles per hour reliably. DSP is a reasonable interpretation of what they are talking about.

Another possible meaning of "digital connectivity" is that they are now using digital networking to link their transmitter sites and control centers (such as VOIP). They could also be referring to satcom, as "a system-wide technology refresh" would imply all elements of ARINC/ASRI communications - satellite, VHF voice, HF voice, ACARS, and HFDL.
 

majoco

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2008
Messages
3,650
Location
New Zealand
Pardon my ignorance, but I believe that ARINC communications have nothing to do with Air Traffic Control - they are a commercial company that enable flight crews to chat to their company offices and others.

Is this a correct assumption, or is someone going to shoot me down? (Oops!)
 

kma371

QRT
Joined
Feb 20, 2001
Messages
6,204
Pardon my ignorance, but I believe that ARINC communications have nothing to do with Air Traffic Control - they are a commercial company that enable flight crews to chat to their company offices and others.

Is this a correct assumption, or is someone going to shoot me down? (Oops!)
You are correct. They are a private entity.
 

mm

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
638
If you click on the ARINC ground domestic radio link that is highlighted at the top of the first sentence you get to another page and the following sentence stood out to me like a pink slip on friday>

"In addition, it allows ground parties to contact their aircraft using any desktop dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) telephone, and aircrew to contact ground parties using DTMF microphones, bypassing ARINC radio operator involvement."


The "bypassing ARINC radio operators involvement" phrase tells me they want to get rid of ground operators who routed calls in the past from their central operations center.

It's probably just another way of saying they want to save money by laying off humans and hand over the call routing to a computer.

Mike
 

nd5y

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
9,108
Location
Wichita Falls, TX
It's probably just another way of saying they want to save money by laying off humans and hand over the call routing to a computer.
I have heard DTMF on some of the airline "company" frequencies around here. I don't think it has anything to do with the regional network dispatched by NY and SF.
 

AirScan

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 13, 2007
Messages
504
The "bypassing ARINC radio operators involvement" phrase tells me they want to get rid of ground operators who routed calls in the past from their central operations center.
Is DTMF really anything new, didn't they have it before ACARS came out ?

I still do not understand what the point of this thread is ? "Obviously Nothing Is Sacred ? The OP has now posted the same link twice, which is just a reorg of some VHF frequencies. Maybe the OP haleve could give us a hint of what their point is ???
 

novascotian

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2008
Messages
327
Location
Halifax, Nova Scotia
I was having a look at the Jeppesen chart and noted that it showed 129.4 as the frequency for the Northeast and extending a little into New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.... and no mention of any other frequency in that area, but on looking at further links I am seeing the other chart or map that depicts a New York ARINC frequency of 129.9 that more or less overlaps with the 129.4 and other frequencies along the east coast and pretty much covering the Atlantic Provinces of Canada...and in fact with a ground station at CYQY (Sydney, Nova Scotia). 129.9 has been the frequency here in Nova Scotia for years, and I am wondering what is the difference between this and the other frequencies shown on the first link mentioned in this thread .. which does not include the 129.9 East Coast network. Does 129.9 have a different use or purpose than the others?
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top