Old Drivers

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PolarBear25

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This isn't really a funny story but one worth telling. Last Tuesday morning appx 5 am OHP dispatcher advised Unit XXX that they had report of older model black Cadillac southbound on I-235 going 10 mph in outside lane.
Unit XXX turned around and caught up with the vehicle. He advised dispatch that it was an elderly woman from Edmond who was just lost. He was going to turn her around and she promised to drive highway speed.
A couple of minutes later he radioed in that she only got up to 20 mph so he was going to park his vehicle, take her home and Unit ZZZ was going to follow him and pick him up. A few minutes passed and he had the dispatcher run her DL. He also advised she was almost out of gas so he was going to try to get to where she traded to get gas.
The lady was 90 yrs old, had no family and had been driving all night, lost and afraid to stop. The trooper took her home, called her pastor and asked him to come check up on her as soon as he could.
Kinda renews your faith in people to hear of a young man like Unit XXX who didn't just go the extra mile for someone in need but went way beyond.
Another reason we need state required testing, For everyone over 65 years of age..
 
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LindaFarrell

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Dec 25, 2006
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Oklahoma City, Ok.
Senior Drivers

Another reason we need state required testing, For everyone over 65 years of age..
Age has nothing to do with it. Anyone can make a wrong turn & end up in unfamiliar territory, especially with all the construction around town. I am well over 65 and don't have a blimish on my driving record for over 35 yrs but I did make one of those wrong turns when I was in my 30's. If it wasn't for all the crime and malicious actions of many on the streets these days, she might have felt comfortable stopping and seeking directions. I would much rather drive on the same street as this lady as some of the younger ones who whip in and out of traffic with windows blacked out so they can't see and their boom boxes going so loud they can't hear a horn honking to avoid being hit. (And I am not just referring to teens) Besides, a lot of elderly people drive out of necessity because their children, friends and neighbors don't care enough to help them out. Before making a statement like you made you should examine your own heart and ask how often you help those who can't help themselves.
 

MoparManor

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Davis, OK
Another reason we need state required testing, For everyone over 65 years of age..
Probably more like for EVERYONE every 5 years no matter what their age.
That might help cut down on all of the non-roadworthy and out of compliance vehicles at the same time.
 

HogDriver

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Probably more like for EVERYONE every 5 years no matter what their age.
That might help cut down on all of the non-roadworthy and out of compliance vehicles at the same time.
AMEN Brother!!! Have a written test. Put on it questions like, "How soon BEFORE a turn should you put on your turn signal?" and "What should you do when you are in the left lane and are approached by a faster moving vehicle behind you in your lane, regardless of whatever speed you are doing?"

Every 10 years would work for me.
 
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PolarBear25

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Age has nothing to do with it. Anyone can make a wrong turn & end up in unfamiliar territory, especially with all the construction around town. I am well over 65 and don't have a blimish on my driving record for over 35 yrs but I did make one of those wrong turns when I was in my 30's. If it wasn't for all the crime and malicious actions of many on the streets these days, she might have felt comfortable stopping and seeking directions. I would much rather drive on the same street as this lady as some of the younger ones who whip in and out of traffic with windows blacked out so they can't see and their boom boxes going so loud they can't hear a horn honking to avoid being hit. (And I am not just referring to teens) Besides, a lot of elderly people drive out of necessity because their children, friends and neighbors don't care enough to help them out. Before making a statement like you made you should examine your own heart and ask how often you help those who can't help themselves.
Probably more like for EVERYONE every 5 years no matter what their age.
That might help cut down on all of the non-roadworthy and out of compliance vehicles at the same time.
Most people anymore don't have a heart...including some on this website.
AMEN Brother!!! Have a written test. Put on it questions like, "How soon BEFORE a turn should you put on your turn signal?" and "What should you do when you are in the left lane and are approached by a faster moving vehicle behind you in your lane, regardless of whatever speed you are doing?"

Every 10 years would work for me.
http://www.dmv.ca.gov/about/senior/driverlicense/drivetest.htm

Driving Tests

As a senior driver being told you have to take a driving test probably makes you think you are about to lose your independence. This is not necessarily true! DMV does not have different licensing standards for senior drivers. It is an individual’s mental and/or physical condition or his/her inability to follow traffic laws and rules, regardless of age, that determines whether DMV renews, restricts, suspends, or revokes a driving privilege.

Senior drivers who are asked to take a driving test have usually:

* Not met DMV's minimum vision requirements, or
* Been referred from a Driver Safety office because of a physical or mental (P&M) condition or lack of driving skill. Sometimes a law enforcement officer, your physician, or a relative or friend who is concerned about the way you are driving may refer you to DMV for a check of your driving ability.

An important point to remember at this time is that DMV may issue a license to a customer who has a physical and/or mental condition if that person is able to demonstrate, during a driving test, that he/she compensates for the condition and can drive safely. The driving test you will be asked to take is called a Supplemental Driving Performance Evaluation (SDPE). In certain situations, if the Supplemental Driving test is too difficult for your abilities, you have the option of taking an Area Driving Performance Evaluation (ADPE). You and the DMV examiner will pre-determine the driving test area and if you pass that driving test, your driver license will be restricted to that area.

What is the purpose of a Supplemental Driving Performance Evaluation?

When DMV asks a driver to take a Supplemental Driving test, it is to determine whether the driver:

* has the ability to operate a motor vehicle safely.
* has formed or retained the proper safe-driving habits.
* can translate the knowledge of traffic laws into actual practice.
* can compensate for any physical condition that might affect safe driving ability, such as poor vision, loss of a limb, or the early stages of dementia.

During your driving test, your examiner will note any driving skill deficiencies or behaviors that need improvement, but would not disqualify you from keeping your driver license. The examiner will discuss these issues with you when have finished your driving test.

You may want to practice your driving skills by taking a driver education and training class specifically developed for older drivers. A list of approved Mature Driver Improvement Programs is available. If your driver license is suspended or revoked and you want to get your license back, contact your local Driver Safety office to inquire about a special instruction permit (SIP).

http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/driver/senior/

Senior Drivers in Ontario
What is the Senior Driver Renewal Program?

The Senior Driver Renewal Program requires that senior drivers, aged 80 years and over, pay the applicable licensing fee, complete a vision test and a knowledge test and take part in a group education session every two years. A small number of drivers may also be asked to take a road test to have their in-car skills assessed.
Why are seniors required to attend a Group Education Session?

This renewal process will help keep seniors mobile and independent longer, while ensuring that unsafe drivers are identified and appropriate actions taken.

While it is true that senior drivers are involved in fewer collisions compared to younger drivers, it is also true that they are involved in a larger number of collisions compared to the number of kilometres they drive. Some senior drivers have said that an annual road test was very stressful for them. Research and a pilot study conducted in Ontario have shown that a well-developed education session may improve senior drivers' awareness of potential traffic hazards and help them drive more defensively.
How does the program support road safety?

With the Senior Driver Renewal Program, older drivers may be required to complete four components: the knowledge and vision tests, the group education session, and a road test if required.

The Group Education Session will:

* give drivers information on driving
* give them the tools to assess how well they are driving
* outline changes which drivers can make to continue to drive safely

Senior drivers will be able to improve their driving performance. As well, the program will be able to more quickly identify drivers who are at greater risk of being in a collision. Most senior drivers will not be required to take a road test.
Who is required to take a road test?

All drivers are assessed by a trained counsellor. Drivers who have indications that they may pose a road safety risk will be required to take a road test. The counsellor at your Group Education Session will discuss this with you.
What type of information is provided to drivers to improve their driving skills during the Group Education Sessions?

Participants will be given:

* information to make senior drivers more aware of the effects of aging on driving
* information to increase their ability to assess risk factors when driving
* information on trip planning and preparation
* suggestions and strategies so senior drivers can minimize the risk of crashing

Are there other measures which senior drivers can take to improve their driving?

There are senior driver improvement programs such as "55 Alive" which are available through safety organizations and various driving schools.

As well, drivers are reminded that they can work at maintaining their driving performance by staying active and healthy (see Senior Driver: Driving Safety Cycle). Drivers are also encouraged to check with their doctor or pharmacist whether their medication may affect their performance. As with drivers of any age, senior drivers should stay alert behind the wheel, and not drive when tired or under a lot of stress.
Are drivers required to complete the knowledge and vision tests and participate in the Senior Driver Group Education Session on the same day?

The vision and knowledge tests will be completed at the same time and place as the Group Education Session. An appointment is required for the vision and knowledge tests and the Group Education Session. When you receive your renewal application in the mail you must contact the MTO Regional Scheduling Office in your area to schedule an appointment. Please have your driver's licence number available when you call. The numbers to call are:

* Southwestern: 1-888-276-7885 or (519) 873-4276
* Central: 1-800-396-4233
* Eastern: 1-800-701-2171
* Northern: 1-800-461-9548 or (705) 497-5436

How will senior drivers who do not speak English be able to participate in the program?

The ministry provides knowledge tests in 17 languages, including English and French. The Group Education Session is available in English and French, and senior drivers who have a valid reason, such as an inability to understand either of these languages, may take a road test. The ministry will authorize a DriveTest Centre to conduct the vision, knowledge and road tests. The driver must contact the DriveTest Centre to schedule the road test.
How will drivers who have a hearing impairment participate in the Group Education Session?

The ministry may authorize senior drivers with a hearing impairment to take a road test. The ministry will authorize a DriveTest Centre to conduct the vision, knowledge and road tests. The driver must contact the DriveTest Centre to schedule the road test.
How are senior drivers who spend part of the year outside Ontario accommodated?

The ministry currently allows early renewal, up to six months before the driver's licence expires.

A senior driver who cannot be accommodated by the ministry in a Group Education Session or a test before the licence expires may be issued a Temporary Driver's Licence.
How are drivers notified about their licence renewal?

Drivers are notified by mail approximately 60 days before their licence expires, and should contact the MTO Regional Scheduling Office in their area to make arrangements for their licence renewal. They must take the knowledge and vision tests and the Group Education Session so that they can complete them before their licence expires.
Where can people get more information about the program?

For further information please complete our online feedback form, or contact the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Contact Centre at 416-235-2999 or toll free at 1-800-387-3445.

See also:

* How's Your Driving? Safe Driving for Seniors
* Senior Driver: Driving Safety Cycle
* Renewing Your Licence: Process for Drivers 80 Years of Age and Over
* Senior Driver Group Education - Curriculum
 
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