Old State Low Band System

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KN4HTC

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Just wondering if anyone knows roughly how many low band sites the state used to have and about where they each were. If anyone has a list of all of the frequencies that were used, I don't mind looking up the expired FCC licenses for them.
 

KN4HTC

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Thanks! Any idea roughly how many sites it took to cover the state? The wiki doesn't have the full list. Just kinda curious about how the coverage was.
 

NathanJ

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HGPNNCXB43F

spacellamaman

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Stirring up old memories.... TROOP G - LOWBAND SITE COVERAGE MAP /

Fun fact: If you key up all 6 stations on the same freq, you don't get heard 6x better!! :p
man that map is awesome. i don't know how i have never come across it before. dern shame i didn't see it prior to it being a historic curiosity. things like this get deleted cause people who host them think no one would be, or is still, interested. they are mistaken too sadly. thanks for keeping it around :)

what else ya got lying around to share with the class?

as you can probably answer this:

when i see coverage maps like this one, which is quite granular in detail, i am always curious as to the method that the little tiny spots in the fringe/margin areas are determined.

is it a automated process, such as line of site from tower location using elevation/terrain models via some sort of GIS systems layers, compilation of reports over time/"can you hear me now" on the ground tests, both or none of the above???
 
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N4VX

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Penrose, NC
when i see coverage maps like this one, which is quite granular in detail, i am always curious as to the method that the little tiny spots in the fringe/margin areas are determined.
SPLAT! was used to generate the coverage maps. It's pretty crude and not a replacement for field surveys. The actual 42MHz coverage varied quite dramatically from what was calculated and displayed on the map. It was mainly used for training communicators and geographically showing why selecting the proper station really did matter and helping explain why you cannot use more than one station on the same channel at a time. Funny thing is.... If they would have just used the voter talkback they wouldn't have to worry about what site they should respond with :LOL:
SPLAT! A Terrestrial RF Path Analysis Application For Linux/Unix
 

spacellamaman

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cool deal thanks for the info, something new to learn about. its so interesting to me, since only in recent years having learned about it myself, to know how importent the Space Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was to this sort of thing, yet it lives as an overlooked footnote in history, the assumption being GPS/USGS/etc has it all covered.

on the other note: the last thing anyone wants to hear is any backtalk from some lowly voter.

i know my station in life. get off my lawn!
 

NathanJ

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SPLAT! was used to generate the coverage maps. It's pretty crude and not a replacement for field surveys. The actual 42MHz coverage varied quite dramatically from what was calculated and displayed on the map. It was mainly used for training communicators and geographically showing why selecting the proper station really did matter and helping explain why you cannot use more than one station on the same channel at a time. Funny thing is.... If they would have just used the voter talkback they wouldn't have to worry about what site they should respond with :LOL:
SPLAT! A Terrestrial RF Path Analysis Application For Linux/Unix
They had the voters, why the never tagged the Greensboro / D guys in to help set levels so they would function properly, never made any sense to me.
 

Tobydog

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NCSHP renewal of oldie but goodie frequency 47.460 granted by FCC this week, guess they aren't ready to let go yet.
Tower location of APPROX .3 MI N OF SR 1117 AND HWY 64 INT COLUMBIA, NC TYRRELL County

Just another "ghost" of emergency management still in use. Low band may be out of style it is still a good spectrum when needed. Still have my EM radio in the basement.
 

richardbritt

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Lots of the rural counties around Columbia are still licensed for 47.46 also as a back up to talk to NCEM. Hurricane country you know out this way. Chowan County where I live still has a base station. So do some of the neighboring counties. It's always possible that there is a microwave tie in on the tower site in Columbia. Just a thought
 
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