Part 90 Cert Mobile Radio with 2 Meter Recommendation?

tglendye

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I am looking for a 2-meter mobile radio that has Part 90 certification so it can also transmit out of the ham band and in the 150mhz area. A dual band UHF for transmit in the 460 range would be a plus.

Can someone give me some options?

Thanks!
 

mmckenna

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I am looking for a 2-meter mobile radio that has Part 90 certification so it can also transmit out of the ham band and in the 150mhz area. A dual band UHF for transmit in the 460 range would be a plus.
Unless you are looking at the Cheap Chinese Radios, a dual band Part 90 radio is going to be expensive. If you have room, you'd save some money by running a separate VHF and UHF radio. That would also allow you to run band specific antennas for each radio, and that makes more sense when you are looking at covering a wide portion of the bands.

For my personal vehicles...
I'm running a Motorola CDM-1550 in my truck. It'll cover 2 meter band and all the way up to 174MHz. You can do a remote head kit that allows it to squeeze in some small spaces. There is a ton of used ones on the market.

I'm running a Kenwood TK-7180H in my wife's truck. Like the CDM, it'll cover 136-174. It has a smaller control head, so it fits better in her smaller truck. The Kenwood programming software is easier to use than the Motorola. It's also easier to get. Kenwood is/was still producing the TK-x180 mobiles, so you can get them new or used.

For UHF, both the CDM and TK-8180 will do what you want. Just make sure you get the right bandsplit. Unlike the VHF models, the UHF models do not cover the entire band.
 

tglendye

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OK, thanks for the reply. I'll look into those options. And I believe you covered something I meant to ask... Am I correct that a commercial/ public safety radio that will operate on 2 meter or 70cm is legal to operate in the amateur band? I know an amateur radio, such as a Yaesu cannot be modified for public safety use.
 

mmckenna

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OK, thanks for the reply. I'll look into those options. And I believe you covered something I meant to ask... Am I correct that a commercial/ public safety radio that will operate on 2 meter or 70cm is legal to operate in the amateur band? I know an amateur radio, such as a Yaesu cannot be modified for public safety use.
You are correct.

An amateur radio does not need type certification on the transmitter. They often have a Part 15 certification, but that's on the receiver. No matter what anyone tells you, an amateur only radio with no Part 90 type certification on the transmitter is not legal to transmit anywhere outside the amateur radio bands. Even in emergencies.

For LMR use, you need Part 90, as you know. Since amateur radio doesn't require type certification on the transmitter, it's 100% legal to use them on ham. Many of us in the industry do since it means one radio for work and play.
 

PrivatelyJeff

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I am looking for a 2-meter mobile radio that has Part 90 certification so it can also transmit out of the ham band and in the 150mhz area. A dual band UHF for transmit in the 460 range would be a plus.

Can someone give me some options?

Thanks!
Anytone D578UV for mobile and D878UV for handheld. They legally do part 25 and ham. The only downside is no remote heads.
 

tweiss3

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The answer will also depend on if you need analog, or if there is a digital mode you need (P25, NXDN, DMR).

I agree with mmckenna, stay away from the Chinese radios (AT-D578), the Connect Systems CS800D does not seem to have the problems Anytone does.
 

PrivatelyJeff

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[QUOTE="tweiss3, post: 3492838, member: 1380750"

I agree with mmckenna, stay away from the Chinese radios (AT-D578), the Connect Systems CS800D does not seem to have the problems Anytone does.
[/QUOTE]

What problems do you speak of? I’ve had all of the Anytone radios and have yet to have a problem.
 

sallen07

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I agree with mmckenna, stay away from the Chinese radios (AT-D578), the Connect Systems CS800D does not seem to have the problems Anytone does.
The D578 is a "CR" but I wouldn't consider it a "CCR". It's a nice little radio.

You might also want to investigate where Connect Systems radios are made ....
 

tweiss3

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What problems do you speak of? I’ve had all of the Anytone radios and have yet to have a problem.
I've had terrible problems with desensitization and front end overload. There is also the occasional freezing, and the SFR DMR issues, and no removable head. Also, using the mode that allows the ham bands technically voids its part 90 certification, and if you keep it in professional mode, you are stuck with FMN across the board.

The D578 is a "CR" but I wouldn't consider it a "CCR". It's a nice little radio.

You might also want to investigate where Connect Systems radios are made ....
I'm aware its also Chinese, but I also know that talking to Jerry, there were multiple revisions in getting it certified to improve the radio design and reduce spurious emissions. I've also had some questions and comments with actual responses directly from the firmware engineers.

That being said, if I actually needed a Part 90 radio, I would go with either a dual deck, single head Kenwood (big money), or two single band units from Kenwood.
 

N4GIX

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I have two CS800 UHF version and one CS800D U/V version. All three of them have really crappy front ends and suffer from severe intermod anywhere near downtown Chicago...
 

N4GIX

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I quite typing too soon. Outside of downtown Chicago (or any city of similar size), all three of those radios work splendidly. Their front end sensitivity is outstanding. It's the selectivity that's lacking.
 

hill

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I have the UHF CS800 in the mobile and no issues with any intermod anywhere the Baltimore Washington area with it using a small quarter wave antenna. It only gets used on ham 440 both analog and DMR.
 

N4KVE

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I have the UHF CS800 in the mobile and no issues with any intermod anywhere the Baltimore Washington area with it using a small quarter wave antenna. It only gets used on ham 440 both analog and DMR.
The CS800/D radios have a dual conversion receiver. The Anytone radios do not. They have direct conversion receivers. Big difference.
 

jhooten

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The problem with using newer Part 90 equipment on Amateur frequencies is narrow banding. Part 90 went narrow band, Part 97 didn't (yet). Yes, I know there are some narrow band amateur repeaters out there now. They are few and far between.
 

AI7PM

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The problem with using newer Part 90 equipment on Amateur frequencies is narrow banding. Part 90 went narrow band, Part 97 didn't (yet). Yes, I know there are some narrow band amateur repeaters out there now. They are few and far between.
My Motorola XPR7550 and 5550s will do multiple bandwidths, including 12.5 and 25. The Kenwood 5000 series will do both as well.
 
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The problem with using newer Part 90 equipment on Amateur frequencies is narrow banding. Part 90 went narrow band, Part 97 didn't (yet). Yes, I know there are some narrow band amateur repeaters out there now. They are few and far between.
It's not really a problem. More of something you just need to be aware of. Some radios will be stuck in narrowband operation due to the firmware on them (Icom does this on some newer radios). Other's will require a wideband entitlement key (such as with some Motorola commercial series radios). Other's just don't care (Tait, Simoco, etc). Then you have others which are smart like Motorola's APX CPS which won't let you program narrow between 148-174 MHz, 450-470 MHz, 700 MHz or 900 MHz) but will allow you to program wide for Federal/amateur spectrum and even has some exemptions for things like GMRS and Marine VHF.
 
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