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Part 90 licensing and coordination?

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fog

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I've been a ham for about 20 years and an avid scanner listener since I was a little kid, but I'm comparatively in the dark on Part 90 stuff.

I'd like to set up a small trunked system, private carrier, for resale to "eligibles" as people seem to like to say in the licenses. I have a site in mind and a firm grasp on the technology involved. (I'd set up a small Capacity Plus system, which, like LTR, doesn't seem to require the FB8 licenses.)

How do I actually go about licensing all this, though? Do I contact a coordinator and let them handle the process? Or can I file myself and just get the coordinator to sign off on the frequencies? Within a band, do I select the frequencies and let the coordinator/FCC approve them, or does the coordinator suggest the frequencies?

It seems like there are a zillion forum posts on the technology, but next to nothing online discussing the actual licensing process. Is there some book or site that goes into good detail on this?
 

clbsquared

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In my experience, it's best to pay someone who specializes in licensing. The few hundred dollars I've spent with them in the last couple of years has been well worth it. And I was headache free through the entire process.

Sent from my HTC One A9 using Tapatalk
 

jhooten

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Depending on the number of channels you want the coordinator's fees can run over $1k. For the 12 channel Mototrbo system at my part time job was just under $2K to the do the coordination and file the FCC application.
 

mmckenna

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For most Part 90 stuff, it's going to require a coordinator. Especially for something like you want to do.

If you are serious about this, then that's the way to go.
 

chief21

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Getting frequency coordination and subsequent licensing for a small business / single channel is difficult enough. I can imagine what might be involved for a commercial provider of radio communications. I expect that you would be well-served to let a professional firm run the hurdles for you.

John
 
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DaveNF2G

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The process you want to initiate is going to be nothing like putting up a ham repeater. You are going to need a lot of money.
 

fog

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For most Part 90 stuff, it's going to require a coordinator. Especially for something like you want to do.

If you are serious about this, then that's the way to go.
Oh yeah, I don't think coordination is optional. It just seems like many of the coordination firms offer a sort of all-in-one service that handles all the paperwork for you on top of coordination, and I wonder how much of that is realistic to do on my own.

It seems, both from the comments here and from licenses I've looked at, that a lot of people opt for that service, so maybe it's a lot more involved than I expect.
 

mmckenna

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Applying for a complex Part 90 license isn't something you should try unless you've done similar work before. The license applications are complex. Letting the frequency coordinator do it for you will save a lot of headaches.

I've been in the industry for 20 years, and I gladly pay someone to do the complex stuff.
 

TampaTyron

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I have also been in the radio business for just under 20 years. Use a good coordinator and do not be afraid of the all-in-one or the hand-holding fee. It saves time and money. Especially if you want to put up a system that you will have to maintain and will charging other s for. TT
 

prcguy

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I agree, pay a coordinator to do all the work including filling out your FCC application. Many years ago I was able to do the FCC licensing after paying for coordination but its more of a headache now. One thing I always do is choose some frequencies and monitor for a couple of weeks, then work with the coordinator on the quietest freqs I find. They usually appreciate that.

I was in the business of renting repeater air time 35yrs ago and was licensed as a common carrier so my licence covered all my customers. Not sure how that is handled these days on new systems, but you need make sure your license will cover your customers. Otherwise each customer will have to get their own license and that is a very hard sell to rent air time.

Last basic LMR repeater licensing I did 4 years ago ran about $1,200 for five UHF pairs with coordination and filling out the FCC forms. I forgot what the actual FCC license fee was but that's available on line.
prcguy
 
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