Part Numbers SP501 and IC408

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Starman918

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Hello,
I sent my 396T in for repair, for sound problems, and they replaced the above parts. I assume the SP501 is a speaker, but does anyone know waht the IC408 is?
Thanks
Tom
 

garys

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It's an integrated circuit, but you probably knew that. What it does is harder to know unless you have a schematic and parts diagram.

GAry
 

bergg

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Part Numbers SP501 and IC408 Reply to Thread

Mine was sent back today with the same parts replaced.

They put on new front for numbers had worn off.

Tell me, does it sound any better. Mine had the worst sound I've
ever heard from any scanner.

I hope this does it.

Thanks, Bob
 
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IC 408 is an 8-pin chip, located behind the display and to the left of the headphone jack (as viewed from behind).

It has markings of 569-A01 on mine.

I was unsuccessful at locating the datasheet by cross-referencing the marking as a Mfr. Part Number. Sorry...

Here is a close-up photo...

I know it is not much help but it's all I can find, short of having the circuit diagram.

If I could venture a guess, from what I see, looks like an Op-Amp (maybe) acting as audio amplifier for the headphone jack! Tracing pin 5 (and pin 7 through 2 surface-mounted components) straight to the headphone jack...

I also may be very far in left field with this...who knows?

Anabella M.
 

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slicerwizard

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It's a Toko TK10569M audio amp. Uniden originally used the Toko TK10565M amp in the 396. They got a bad batch of the 10565's from the manufacturer, which led to a lot of the audio problems that owners have been dealing with.
 
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slicerwizard said:
It's a Toko TK10569M audio amp. Uniden originally used the Toko TK10565M amp in the 396. They got a bad batch of the 10565's from the manufacturer, which led to a lot of the audio problems that owners have been dealing with.

Thanks! My guess was pretty close.

So that means that original owners of the old IC are potentially more at risk of having audio problems.

As a precaution, if users encounter such problems, it may help to identify if they have the new IC or the old IC. I'm glad to have the new version.

Slicerwizard, didn't you come up with an audio mod? I can't seem to find anything on it and would it be possible to point in the right direction?

Very much thanks.

Anabella M.
 

slicerwizard

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So that means that original owners of the old IC are potentially more at risk of having audio problems.
Only if they got a bad one - then their odds are 100%, as they sounded bad from the starting gate.

As a precaution, if users encounter such problems, it may help to identify if they have the new IC or the old IC. I'm glad to have the new version.
Nice to know, but I suspect that either would work in any given 396, but I'd have to check the datasheets first to be sure.

Slicerwizard, didn't you come up with an audio mod? I can't seem to find anything on it and would it be possible to point in the right direction?

The image is at http://home.ica.net/~phoenix/wap/BCD396T/396T Audio Hack.JPG

The yellow/blue wire is used to bypass the bad half of the amp. When using an external speaker/headphone, the bad half is bypassed anyway, so if the audio sounds fuzzy with the internal speaker, but not with an external speaker, this mod may make life bearable when using the internal speaker - it certainly did for me.

If the mod doesn't help, it's no big deal to remove the yellow wire and reconnect that side of the speaker to its stock pad.

The only thing one needs to be careful about is the clearance between the added wire (where its soldered to the cap) and the mount for the SMA connector (which is grounded) - contact isn't recommended.
 
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slicerwizard said:
The yellow/blue wire is used to bypass the bad half of the amp.

I edited and posted a close-up picture of the audio section below.

Can you please confirm that this is the exact point where the yellow/blue wire is connected in your mod?

Thanks, Anabella M.
 

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slicerwizard said:
Yeppers, the positive end of the 47uF cap.

What are you up to? :)

oh, about 5'3" :)

I'm just enhancing my technical knowledge of the audio circuitry by tactical information gathering.

Not that I need to perform that mod or anything, but I do enjoy the challenges and technical aspects of tinkering and modding occasionally when required to enhance a product that misses something or can be made better.

Take a look at the power switch mod I made to my remote head in the RH96 thread. It wasn't much to do, but achieved extremely satisfactory results for me which greatly enhanced the useability of my remote head just by the addition of a simple switch. All done without service diagrams too...this is where the power of smart deductions come to play. IMO, a big part of the challenges...

One more question: what is that under the white heat shrink in your photo and what is its purpose?

Thanks.

Anabella M.
 
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Universaldecoder said:
Wow, thanks Starman for this thread and the pics (Anabella M.).

No problems for pictures, I have everything inside photographed from a previous technical investigation (AKA taking a peek under the hood hehehehe).

Universaldecoder said:
Hopefully, it is the answer to my audio issue as well.

Do you happen to know if you have the old IC or the new one? Just curious... if you don't know, no big deal.

Good luck on your repairs.

Anabella M.
 

slicerwizard

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oh, about 5'3" :)
Yeah, OK short stuff.

I'm just enhancing my technical knowledge of the audio circuitry by tactical information gathering.
Gotcha. The circuit is fairly simple to trace - it's all pretty much right there next to the amp.

Take a look at the power switch mod I made to my remote head in the RH96 thread. It wasn't much to do, but achieved extremely satisfactory results for me which greatly enhanced the useability of my remote head just by the addition of a simple switch. All done without service diagrams too...this is where the power of smart deductions come to play. IMO, a big part of the challenges...
Nicely done. That remote head seems overpriced for what's in it. Using the serial protocols that the 246/396/996 employ, it wouldn't take much to build a homebrew version. I already have the PIC processor, 4 line LCD display and a 4x4 keypad. I could program it to do things the way I want - like long presses to toggle groups (rather than Func-#), shortcuts to hold on selected groups, etc. "Go back to that last group you were on" would be great for those "hey, that sounded interesting" moments.

It wouldn't take much to have it control my 246 and 396 simultaneously. Sure is tempting...

One more question: what is that under the white heat shrink in your photo and what is its purpose?
More tactical information gathering, eh? The reverse polarity protection diode that's across the DC power jack decided to fail shorted, which left me unable to power the radio or charge the cells with the AC adapter. The diode is under that glob of epoxy that covers part of the micro. Attempts to blow the diode open (with several amps through the DC jack) didn't get very far because the epoxy was acting as a heat sink. After grinding the epoxy down enough, I was able to get the diode to open (in a nice puff of smoke). It also gave me access to the positive side of the jack. I replaced the blown diode with the 1N4001 that you see in the photo. The heatshrink is just there for insulation.
 
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slicerwizard said:
I was able to get the diode to open (in a nice puff of smoke)

Nice job fixing that diode. It is common knowledge that letting the highly compressed smoke escape from within electronic semiconductors renders same useless :) :) :)

Thanks for sharing your technical knowledge with me, It is VERY appreciated.

Cold in Toronto eh? We have 20C here in Victoria and 18C tomorrow (just rubbing it in hehehe)

Cheers from Victoria, BC and have a safe long weekend.
Anabella M.
 

Universaldecoder

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Morning Anabella M.,

Off hand, I have not opened the unit because it is still under warranty.

Just out of curiosity, what make and model of soldering equipment do you use on these tiny surface mount components? Solder type? Temperature setting?
 

Universaldecoder

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Sorry for the double post....MOD please delete....

Morning Anabella,

Off hand, I have not opened the unit because it is still under warranty.

Just out of curiosity, what make and model of soldering equipment do you use on these tiny surface mount components? Solder type? Temperature setting?

I'm going to attempt a repair on another scanner I have that had an unfortunate encounter with Tim Hortons.
 
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Universaldecoder said:
Just out of curiosity, what make and model of soldering equipment do you use on these tiny surface mount components? Solder type? Temperature setting?
I'm going to attempt a repair on another scanner I have that had an unfortunate encounter with Tim Hortons.

Ah! Electronics and double-double don't mix... :)

I have the Printed Circuit Board Repair and the High-Reliability Soldering Level II qualifications. If I was to replace IC 408 in my scanner, I would bring it to my place of work where I have access to a Pace Soldering Station and a microscope to inspect. Solder type: normal. Temperature setting: high enough to melt the solder but not too high to damage the component, use heat sinks.
 
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BCD396T Charging Log Charts

slicerwizard, I knew your name was familiar when I saw the picture of your excellent mod that you posted.

I (without your permission) used your BCD396T charging log data to make some charts. I didn't know where to ask and I meant only to provide a visual interpretation of YOUR data.

I find this easier to interpret since I'm a very visual person. I hope you don't mind too much for manipulating your data and I didn't know who to give credit to.

So, I say thank you for having the patience to monitor these over a 14-hour period and posting the values that I charted.

The charts are in this PDF document:

Anabella M.
 

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