PG County Fire Dispatcher Auctioneer

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dougxd

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First post guys...go easy on me :p

Why do a few of the FD dispatchers speak soooo fast? I really struggle to understand what they're saying. They almost sound like auctioneers! I guess what really matters is that the responders actually understand.

Also why not condense the "respond on talkgroup 8A2" or whatever to "...A2" or whatever since it seems ALL the fire department talkgroups are 8xx anyway?

Just my non-important random thoughts for the day.
 

Mr_Boh

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Combination of things. Biggest being call volume.

For example, they have so many calls the two tones have to go out on a separate simulcast from the channel 1 simulcast and usually are behind what's being dispatched so that the dispatcher doesn't fall behind and slow down the time from receipt of call to time dispatched. In comparison, Montgomery County will dispatch the two tones then transmit the assignment - you just don't hear the tones on the 800MHz system, only the VHF simulcast

Another big factor is they are well trained. They are accurate, clear, and quickly correct and mistakes they make and the more you get used to listening them the easier it is to follow.
 

troymail

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I go back to long, long ago -- the TV show "Adam 12".... they had a ride-along and the ride-along asked "how can you hear that with the volume so low?"....

Although not optimal or really desired, dispatchers talk fast because they have alot going on. However, on the receiving end, people are used to hearing things a certain way and understand it. They typically also have other means of getting the same information (the voice dispatch isn't the only source of the dispatch/response information).
 

atlong

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The proceeding 8 is the Council of Governments number for PG county. 7 is for Montgomery County, etc. If PG units are dispatched into Montgomery County, that number matters. The same holds true for other jurisdictions like AA County, Charles County, etc who are not part of the COG. That's why they announce the entire talkgroup.


Also why not condense the "respond on talkgroup 8A2" or whatever to "...A2" or whatever since it seems ALL the fire department talkgroups are 8xx anyway?
 

troymail

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The proceeding 8 is the Council of Governments number for PG county. 7 is for Montgomery County, etc. If PG units are dispatched into Montgomery County, that number matters. The same holds true for other jurisdictions like AA County, Charles County, etc who are not part of the COG. That's why they announce the entire talkgroup.


Also why not condense the "respond on talkgroup 8A2" or whatever to "...A2" or whatever since it seems ALL the fire department talkgroups are 8xx anyway?
I suspect the idea (if you look at the whole area) units and talkgroups are all proceeded by the COG number. To avoid confusion if/when a significant event occurs with alot of mutual aid going on, you want people used to hearing 8A2 vs. 7B (Montgomery County) vs. 4B (Fairfax), etc.

You don't want routine operations to be different than major event operations.
 

boatbod

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Are you sure the 8 and 7 don't refer to 800mhz and 700mhz? I know that in FiRST terminology for example, "7R4" means 700mhz Region 4 (a MIEMSS consult channel grouping)

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

Mr_Boh

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Are you sure the 8 and 7 don't refer to 800mhz and 700mhz? I know that in FiRST terminology for example, "7R4" means 700mhz Region 4 (a MIEMSS consult channel grouping)

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk


Very. It's the COG numbers. The NIFOG designations for national interoperability are designed so they can be recognized by frequency band (so when you are doing incident planning you select the correct equipment). But in terms of day to day the COG does talk groups based on COG numbers. So D.C. Fire is on 0 zones, Fairfax on 4, etc.
 
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