Philadelphia, PA - Campus safety modifies two-way radio system

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W8RMH

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Where do they find these stupid reporters. This one has contradicted herself.

"The modification required any equipment not capable of operating on channels of 12.5 kHz or less to be replaced by Jan. 1, 2013."

"However, there is currently no deadline set for making this transition."

I also question this statement, "Due to a change in efficiency standards, Campus Safety Services was contacted by the Federal Communications Commission approximately two years ago regarding new requirements for their two-way mobile radio system."

I don't think that the FCC is contacting license holders in reference to narrow banding.

And I love this statement, not necessarily the reporter's, - "Everyone’s going to digital, so we decided to go to digital as well.” This process cost CSS approximately $250,000, from the department’s budget.
(I hope no one jumps off a bridge.)

And this one too,

"creates opportunity to utilize added features, like the new system’s emergency panic button"

Panic buttons have been on analog radios for over 30 years.

P.S. To Thunderbolt, thank you for providing all these great scanner related news stories. Sorry, I get a little frustrated when these irresponsible news agencies report inaccuracies.
 
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kb2vxa

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So where's the contradiction? Try quoting the complete paragraph thus instead of cherry picking it.

"The FCC predicts licensees will ultimately implement equipment that is designed to operate on channel bandwidths of 6.25 kHz or less. However, there is currently no deadline set for making this transition."
 

W2NJS

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The unstated parts of reporting a story are fact checking and accuracy, both of which are in short supply these days, more so when a non-techie attempts write a tech-based story. Your editor should be the one backing you up and, when necessary, correcting your copy, but it just doesn't happen when stories such as this are written for the non-techie press outlets.
 
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