Port of Portland

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No idea, but public safety users (port police, airport fire, airport ops, etc.) are already on Portland's 800 MHz trunked system.

Total wild guess, but I'm wondering if this license is for operations that include day-to-day security and operation of other port properties, and/or maybe even for other things like hazardous materials response. They do run far more than just the PDX airport, including area business and industrial parks, a large maritime port, smaller airports, etc.

Quick link to brochure about various facilities:
http://cdn.portofportland.com/pdfs/Prp_Portfolio.pdf

Hopefully someone else can chime in with more info.
 

Wilrobnson

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2 of the addresses are maritime shipping terminals, and the third says Marine Facilities Maintenance. Just guessing, but something to do with the maritime side of their operations? Dunno how it's trunked, however (and I can't Google Earth the distances bewteen locations due to lousy internet OCONUS).
 

KE7JFF

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Yeah, I was going to say, I reconize those addresses as part of Terminal 5 and Terminal 6...

Come to think of it, the Potash terminal at T5 I think uses DMR....
 

Fielder3

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MFSA Columbia River

Not to get off topic but I came across this website 12 years ago. Maritime Fire and Safety Association operates on a VHF system.
https://www.mfsa.com/communications

Interesting reading, I have several spill response VHF channels spill response frequencies I can add once back to my radio guide at home. Believe me, you will hear them on VHF marine channels listed on the website when a HAZMAT situation occurs on a waterway or shipboard.

Their radio base is downtown Portland I think. -200 Market Merchants Building in Portland.

"In addition to the system itself, new channels (frequencies) were added at the same time. The Exchange now maintains constant watch over channels 11, 16, 18A and 5 separate tactical and command frequencies for oil spills and shipboard emergencies. They also have at their disposal channels 13, 80, and channel 14 which they set aside for phone patches from ship to shore or vice versa. Even with cellular phones becoming more commonplace the watch-standers at the Exchange, we find that 90% of communications with transiting ships on the Columbia River still come in by the more reliable VHF-FM radio."
 
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