• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Post-rebanding signal strength

Status
Not open for further replies.

1464

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
7
My local public safety system is a Motorola Type II Smartzone system with analog and digital voice. I monitor this system with several XTS 3000 radios as well as some Uniden scanners.

Since rebanding I have noticed a lot more drop-out in traffic on both the radios and scanners. Out out of curiosity, I recently took a Uniden 296D on a drive around town, listening only to the control channel.

What I found was signal strength of the CC is less than half of what it used to be. I realize the signal indicator on a scanner is not the most reliable tool for determining signal strength, but in areas where I was receiving a clean signal at 5 bars (most of the county) before rebanding, I'm now receiving one or two bars with lots of noise.

The system in question started rebanding a little before Christmas. Is the reduced signal part of the process of switching multiple towers to the new frequencies? Should I expect signal strength to improve at some point? Should I start shopping for better antennas?

Any thoughts are appreciated.
 

1464

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
7
Thanks for the reply, it is a simulcast system. Any idea on timeline for optimizing a system? Days, weeks or months?
 

fineshot1

Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2004
Messages
2,479
Location
NJ USA (Republic of NJ)
Thanks for the reply, it is a simulcast system. Any idea on timeline for optimizing a system? Days, weeks or months?
There is no timeline - it all depends on when moto & the customer can make it happen.
Could be weeks or months, a lot depends on the priority of the customer.

It may already have been optimized and you may be hearing the results(or not hearing).
Some simulcast systems are not meant for great area coverage beyond certain limits.
 

n5ims

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2004
Messages
3,689
It also may be that during the rebanding process some temporary repeaters are added to allow both the old and new frequencies to exist for a short period of time. These temporary repeaters may be lower power, use temporary antennas that may have less gain and/or be located in less than optimal locations (lower on the tower, for example), as well as temporary coax runs with more loss than a perminant run would use. Once the transition is complete, the main repeaters are retuned and optimized and the temporary items removed.
 

1464

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
7
That makes me hopeful about seeing some improvement in the signal quality. I've haven't had a chance to cruise by all of the towers, but I have found one that's listed as belonging to the system in the FCC database that doesn't seem to be transmitting at all. The others I've checked have a strong signal once you get within a mile or so.

I guess I'll give it some more time.. Thanks for the help.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top