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Power desk mic suggestions needed

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darticus

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POWER DESK MIC SUGGESTIONS NEEDED

I have a RCI 2995 DX and looking for a great desktop power mic. Any thoughts on this. The Workman DM502B might be a good choice as some have said. Thanks Ron
 

prcguy

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Many (many) years ago I used to sell CB equipment and we handled every communications microphone available at the time. Hands down the Shure model 526T amplified base mic was the best sounding, kick butt, worked great on every radio mic I have ever encountered.

I have several of these mics which are now out of production and currently use them on amateur and military radios with the same great success. I've even used a variety of high end dynamic and condenser recording mics, Heil PR-40, etc, through W2IHY equalizers, outboard recording EQ, compressors, processors, etc, and after dialing this all in I can switch back to the stock Shure 526T and most people prefer that.

You can pick up 526Ts on Epay in the $20 to $50 range and I prefer the version with the thicker straight cord over the newer type II with the coiled cord.
prcguy


POWER DESK MIC SUGGESTIONS NEEDED

I have a RCI 2995 DX and looking for a great desktop power mic. Any thoughts on this. The Workman DM502B might be a good choice as some have said. Thanks Ron
 

Dawn

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Pinecrest,Fl
There's a lot of Shure 444's and 526 looking mics out there at cheap prices, often rebranded with commercial radio company names, sometimes Shure itself that are not compatible with CB's expecting dynamic mics. The bulk of what's out there has controlled reluctance cartridges inside that are meant for radios that supply a mic bias on the mic line and also expect inputs that were compatible with carbon button elements that they were originally designed to replace. Most of those mikes have a split key bar for momentary monitoring the channel by disabling the tone squelch. The other lot out there that may not be appropriate were those that were used in paging applications. Often those only have a single, make/break contact for the mic element and not a spdt set for ptt/audio electronic switching.

+2's can be equally confusing. Easiest way is to look for the "shark fin" that the Japanese knockoffs didn't have. Then look for the gain control on the back. Most of these mics were set up for high impedance applications and you need one that's low Z. Some are switchable and the matching is via the amplifier and not a transformer. There's also battery issues with earlier ones that took a battery that's near impossible to get. The latter ones took a 9V battery. Some paging version also have the gain control and have a lift switch. The non amplified ones you also need to know what you're buying. They were made in crystal, ceramic, and dynamic elements. Also another problem is these mikes are pretty much 35-40 years old or more based on their harmonica microphone. There's an internal rubber gasket that's part of the mounting that may have gotten hard or crumbling. It serves to isolate the element from the mic and surface.

Best mic for all applications was the Super Side Kick. For some reason, most anyone I ever did work for eventually gave up the original branded power mic, and wanted a super side kick wired up. While there are variants, most all are switchable for relay and electronic switching and can be set up for high or low impedance. Private label versions and paging version may not. I don't think I ever seen one with a spit bar for commercial although the paging versions often have multiple zone switches. The Shures are good mics, but they're rather rare as dedicated ham or cb microphones and the bulk of them were commercial rebrands. Shure would make any kind of mic and in any type of impedance custom for big OEM's
 

TheSpaceMann

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Many CBers replaced the original microphone elements with different ones. Keep an eye out for this when you get a used mike.
 

cmdrwill

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RCA and GE, even Aerotron used the Shure 500 series desk mics. The RCA ones had a amped mic element. Two resistors and a couple of capacitors to use them on 'other' radios.

Even on ICOM7200.
 

prcguy

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Those were in a similar housing as the Shure 526T but the T had a unique amplifier that I've not seen in any other Shure base mic. The 526T is so good I now have six of them on various radios around here.

Its got a great blend of highs and lows with a mid range peak that everyone likes and the amp sounds and works more like a compressor/amp than most other amplified mics.

All my older original versions with thick straight cord and red knob sound better than the newer version II with coiled cord and either red or black knob. The only difference I can find is the mic cartridge was changed in the newer versions and those are made in Mexico.
prcguy

RCA and GE, even Aerotron used the Shure 500 series desk mics. The RCA ones had a amped mic element. Two resistors and a couple of capacitors to use them on 'other' radios.

Even on ICOM7200.
 

DJ11DLN

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Mudhole, IN
Astatic d104.lollipop and a tug9 head for sideband...thats my preference
Never owned a power mic when I dabbled with CB way back when but I always thought the D104 sounded about the best of any of them. If the radio was set up right, not overmodulated and splattering everywhere.:D
 

muskrat39

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north central Indiana
D104 base, with a 10DE7 head, also known as a "Silver Sidebander". Got the best best reports of any desk mic I ever used, including Turner plus 2 and 3, Sidekick, and the D104 " Lollipop"
 
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