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Power Outages And Scanners

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HUBBGIRL

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Is there a desktop scanner that has battery backup in case of power outages? I
don't mean just for the memory, I mean so you can still listen to it. I really don't
want a handheld. Is there some way I can rig something up, if not? I don't care
if it's an older scanner, just not crystals.
Thanx!
 

wyldman

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Most run of an AC to DC adapter,usually at 12 volts.

Any rechargeable battery pack,or even an automotive battery would work to power it as long as your providing 12 Volts (or whatever voltage your unit requires).

Some of the automotive jump start units have a lighter plug,so you can power devices with it,just use the appropriate 12DC adapter to power your unit.
 

Sonar

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I'm guessing the easiest solution is running an UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply).
 

rbm

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I can't think of any that have self contained batteries offhand. But, you can get a 12 Volt Gel Cell or use a motorcycle/car battery and battery box.

12 Volt 5 Amp
http://www.batterymart.com/battery.mv?p=SLA-12V5-F1

I use a power station battery box that holds a car battery.

It has the normal 12-volt accessory-adapter port/cigarette lighter plug so with the right splitters you can run a lot of scanners for hours.

Here are two examples from Cabelas:
Power Station Battery Box
Item:IG-014210 $39.99
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0001116014210a&type=product&cmCat=search&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&QueryText=battery+box&N=4887&Ntk=Products&Ntx=mode+matchall&Nty=1&Ntt=battery+box&noImage=0

Tempo Power Center Battery Box
Item:2UG-017531 $25.99
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0031070017531a&type=product&cmCat=search&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&QueryText=battery+box&N=4887&Ntk=Products&Ntx=mode+matchall&Nty=1&Ntt=battery+box&noImage=0
 

trooperdude

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HUBBGIRL said:
Is there a desktop scanner that has battery backup in case of power outages? I
don't mean just for the memory, I mean so you can still listen to it. I really don't
want a handheld. Is there some way I can rig something up, if not? I don't care
if it's an older scanner, just not crystals.
Thanx!
Depends on how much you want to spend.

My setup allows me to run about 5 scanners and 6 two way radios on mostly receive mode for two days without recharging. I plan to add another battery in parallel to give me some extended transmit capability.

I use a rig-runner 8012 from WestMountain Radio as a distribution point fed with a Pyramid 40 amp rack mounted 12vdc regulated power supply into a PWRgate, with a large Absorbed Glass Mat gelcell as the battery backup.
 

consys

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I do something similar to trooperdude. My radios are 12v all the time on a trickle charged battery, usually used ups gel cell batteries from work. Sort of a "dc ups" system. Anything less than 12v (like the hand held radios) gets an automotive adapter.

I'll have to swap batteries to do it, but I could easily go a day or more per magnitude on the richer scale- untill the house falls down...
 

Thayne

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If you do a search of this site, sometime previously there was a thread that really went into a lot of ideas and solutions---
 

Halfpint

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trooperdude said:
Depends on how much you want to spend.

My setup allows me to run about 5 scanners and 6 two way radios on mostly receive mode for two days without recharging. I plan to add another battery in parallel to give me some extended transmit capability.

I use a rig-runner 8012 from WestMountain Radio as a distribution point fed with a Pyramid 40 amp rack mounted 12vdc regulated power supply into a PWRgate, with a large Absorbed Glass Mat gelcell as the battery backup.
Great setup, trooperdude! Along with several Leviton PRO-2200 (2) and Leviton PRO-1500 (3) UPSes for our computers and security cameras I've got basically the same setup for my assorted radios. The only difference is that I'm using 4 OPTIMA deep cycle batteries and a SAMLEX 12VDC switching power supply. I also have a GENERAC 6500 continuous/ 8125 Surge backup generator for things like our furnace, fridge, freezer, ETC. along with a little COLEMAN 3500 continuous / 4150 surge generator for the well. So far the longest `outage' we've had to put up with has been just over 1 week and we didn't have any problems `surviving' it. I *did* have to refuel the generators several times and we had to refill the main gas tank (1000 Gal.) afterwards so that we'd have gas for the vehicles and equipment for the rest of the month but, that was only because it was already a bit low at the time since we were already planning to refill it on the first of the next month to get ready for springtime. (We live on a farm and it is just `part-n-parcel' of living on one to have assorted `backups' along with our own gasoline supply.)

HUBBGIRL,

*I* would heartily recommend going with the WestMountain Radio `PWRGate' module, either a WestMountain Radio `RigRunner' or MFJ `MFJ-11XX' DC power strip, and at least one decent sized AGM or OPTIMA deep cycle battery. Not only will you probably not really notice that there was an `outage' but your radios and you will appreciate the better power and the ease of adding or switching radios and other 12VDC equipment when you have to. (I use the MFJ power strips because of the various options *they* offer. I've got one unswitched one for those radios that need a `keep alive' power input and a pair of switched ones for those that don't and which I like to be able to turn off without disturbing settings. While MFJ also offers the `powerpole' terminal option I've opted for the standard `binding post' terminal option for mine because there are times when I will stack dual bannana plugs to provide power for less used equipment or equipment that I've moved over from my electronics bench for one reason or another. [Years ago I `standardized' all of my 12VDC connections on my electronics bench to dual bannana plug spaced 5-way binding posts or banna jacks. I've got many custom lead setups to fit various different pieces of equipment that I have accumulated over the years of working on automotive radios and other automotive equipment along with other assorted stuff. For me it would entail a lot of time and expense to go through and change over from bannana plugs, both dual and singleton, to powerpole connectors and would also mean that a lot of custom test setups would also have to be rebuilt or replaced. {WAN GRIN!}] One other thing about going with the 5-way binding posts would be that you wouldn't have to go through and install the powerpole connectors on everything just to get started. While some here will say that it is easy to do it is a *lot* easier to just make certain that you've got the necessary wires stripped and twisted to eliminate stray strands and then slip the ends into the holes of the proper, + or - polarity, of the appropriate binding post you've selected. You *will* need to either do it yourself or get someone to install the Powerpole connectors needed to hook up the `PWRGate' module but you can probably get the WestMountain Radio people to make up the correct wires for you if you ask them politely or find a HAM that will do it, too.)

Just an `Olde Fart's' 2¢ worth. {VB GRIN!}
 

mikie333

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MO & IL
if i wanted to, could i simply get any car battery, a (preferbly low amp to save cost) battery charger, and an dc/ac inverter (with the ample amout of wattage)?
 

wyldman

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mikie333 said:
if i wanted to, could i simply get any car battery, a (preferbly low amp to save cost) battery charger, and an dc/ac inverter (with the ample amout of wattage)?
Yes,it will work.Just be careful of any fumes if keeping the battery inside.

You will probably not need the inverter,as you can run most radios on DC anyways.No need to convert DC to AC,just to have the radios adapter convert it from AC back to DC.

If your looking for something cheap,I think a portable jump start unit would be better.It's sealed (no offgassing),and comes with a charger.They can be had pretty cheap.
 
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poltergeisty

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Some more options.​


Do you have a backup power supply (UPS) for the computer? If you do you can plug the scanner in there. There are many different back up power supplys in the market.

If your base has a 12V jack you could use that but if the power goes out you need to connect it to the battery. So it would not stay on without your intervention. Which, if you are recording your scanners audio to a notebook would cease. So the computer backup power supply would seem to be the best. You want to make sure that you get a Universal Power Supply (UPS) that will allow you to run off it for a long time rather than just allow you to safely shut down the computer.

Tigherdirct

Newegg

This seems nice

This one too

Pricegrabber

Make sure you read the reviews in newegg as it can be helpful and it shows the specs. For instance battery run time.


You may be better of with a hand held to facilitate your need when the power company can't provide its service with the amount of money they make.
 
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tonsoffun

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loumaag

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trooperdude said:
Sonar said:
I'm guessing the easiest solution is running an UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply).
UPS are not designed for extended operation.
I am guessing you mean with the main power off, because a UPS is designed to be online 24/7-365, As to how long they stay up after loss of main power, that is a budget decision, but they are designed to continue to supply the power until the battery is dead (kind of like your custom setup.)
 

poltergeisty

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Seen as how a scanner's consummation of current isn't that much. An inexpensive ~ $30.00-$60.00 back up power supply/ Universal Power Supply/ Un-interruptible Power Supply: IE (UPS). Should last a very long time!

If, it's just powering a scanner. However, a computer connected as well will last a good amount of time too.

My post's are intended as a direct response to the "OP" circumventing the statements "I have
this and that"
 
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LedZeppelin

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You REALLY should invest in a rechargable battery-powered handheld backup in case of emergencies such as an extended power outage where UPS's won't cut it. This summer has been terrible with the summer storms where we have lost power for more than a few hours, and I'm glad I've had my BC246T to keep me informed on all the going on's.
 

nexus

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You could get 2 6volt batteries, you know they big rectangular ones with the spring terminals on the top. get some copper wire, take two of these batteries, tape them together, then get a small piece of copper wire, use it as a jumper...

connect one end of the wire to the POSITIVE pole of one battery, and connect the other end of the wire to the NEGATIVE pole of the other battery. This is called a series. You're combinding the voltages of both batteries together to give you 13.8 volts DC. Which is what base/mobile scanners use.

You'll need the mobile installation cord for your scanner, of course the connector will plug into the back of the scanner, and the other end should be a red (positive) and black (negative) wire. Attach the red lead to the free positive pole of one of the 2 batteries, and the black lead to the free negative pole. This should power your scanner for several hours in case of an outage.

this diagram shows what I'm talking about.
 
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