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Power source on new desk

KI4GNX

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Before I start, I know that I can only get 15 amps out of the wall outlet. That is no problem. With radios and accessories, I have too many plugs. I also have a few wall warts and they take up space on a power strip. I did find one strip that had a strip of outlets down the middle and 3 outlets on each side that looked like it might work. Reading the reviews with photos, this one might not work depending on the size of the wall warts.

I only have 2 sockets in the wall outlet to use. There is 1 outlet on each wall but I don't want to run short extension cords. All outlets are on the same breaker. To make a short story long, what have you done to get power to many devices at your desk? Thanks!
 

mmckenna

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Power strips. If you search around, you can find ones that are about 6 feet long, designed to go into a 7' tall 19" equipment rack. They have a bunch of outlets spaced out so they'll accept wall warts.

Or, make your own with a board and a bunch of outlet boxes.

I don't know anything about this brand, but we've used similar ones.
 

KI4GNX

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Power strips. If you search around, you can find ones that are about 6 feet long, designed to go into a 7' tall 19" equipment rack. They have a bunch of outlets spaced out so they'll accept wall warts.

I was looking for something like that and none came up. I used to have a power strip that was basically 2 continuous rails and you could plug in anywhere you wanted. That would be nice.

Or, make your own with a board and a bunch of outlet boxes.

Thought about that but thought that it would be too ugly.

I don't know anything about this brand, but we've used similar ones.

Those are expensive!
 

KI4GNX

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My Amazon search turned up the long strips tonight. I don't know why they didn't come up last night.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Home Depot sells some ~ 6 inch cords that have a female plug on top of a male and then a short cord to another female. So you can raise up a wall wart to clear an adjacent plug and also double the connection using the pigtail.
 

WB9YBM

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Power strips. If you search around, you can find ones that are about 6 feet long, designed to go into a 7' tall 19" equipment rack. They have a bunch of outlets spaced out so they'll accept wall warts.
To develop that idea a bit further, I've often used power strips with surge protectors--the kind people use for powering all their computer "stuff". Might be over-kill, or added security, depending on how you look at it...
 

737mech

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You could use a rack mount power conditioner like guitar players use? I have the Pyle PCO-800. It has 8 plugs behind it but you benefit from the power conditioning. When it comes to many radios however use a power supply and rig runner to power many radios.
 

TailGator911

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I use 3 old Radio Shack power strips, about 3 feet long each with 8 outlets and a kill switch. Over 20 yrs old and still going strong. Three wall outlets to the desk that are all wired to light switch at the door for easy kill-all switch. Works ok, but if I don’t tell repairmen and cable techs about it they will inadvertently flip that switch when they walk out the door. YoWch.
 

KI4GNX

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I have power strips with surge protectors. I am trying to keep it neat and simple. I will be using a duplex receptacle in the wall for power. Most power strips that you see have the outlets all bunched together. I was looking for something that I could buy and wouldn't have to build. I like the long strips idea so that I can fit wall warts. I would like to have surge protection. I will look at power conditioners.

I haven't worked at a bench in years and old age fogs the memory. These suggestions brought back memories of a real bench. I'm trying to get ideas from you guys for setting up an inexpensive home bench. So far so good!
 

WB9YBM

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Using one of the long power strips, I was able to shutdown all the radios with one switch.
I like the power strip where 1 outlet stay on. That way I can power everything off (during vacation for example) and my digital clock keeps running (so I don't have to reset it when I get back). (Heathkit used to make those a while back.)
 

N9JIG

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You can eliminate multiple 12VDC wall warts by use of a 12V power supply sized to cover the current draw of the various radios. Look up the maximum current draw of all the radios you have and double that to come up with the minimum current power supply to obtain. For instance if you have a total of 10 12V wall warts, and the maximum current draw of the radios or accessories aggregate to about 7 amps at 12 volts, get a 15 amp power supply.

(Don't confuse the output current capacity with the input current draw. 15 amps at 12v is about 180 watts. That 12v supply will likely draw about 1.5 amps or so at 120 volts.)

This provides you some breathing room for future expansion and math errors. It also allows you to turn off the power supply to kill all the radios at one time and allows these devices to safely share a single outlet and manage any heat issues.

If you have a radio or accessory that needs to be on all the time then you can let that one keep its wall wart while everything else goes to the big supply.

On my desk I have 5 scanners and a multicoupler that share a 6-amp power supply, works great! In my big cabinet I have 20 scanners, a couple of two-ways and several multicouplers and accessories all connected to a 30-amp supply.
 

DS506

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After losing a computer hard drive during a winter storm, I bought an Uninterruptable Power Supply at Best Buy for the computer, scanners and accessories. Have a number of items plugged directly in the UPS, and a power strip to make room for the wall warts and temporary items. Eleven years now, over 150 events where it kicked in. Everything from quick flickers, low voltage to 8 hour outages. A few I was working right in front of it and heard it click on and off, but never noticed the lights flicker or anything. A year ago I noticed it would not last as long so I replaced the batteries and it is like new. Well worth the investment in my eye.
 

WB9YBM

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I like the idea with the UPS. To develop things a bit further: to either save a few dollars by being able to get away with a smaller UPS or extending the operation life between recharges or larger UPS, one trick I've seen is to have the UPS power only the critical equipment. For example amplifiers will only kick in when house power is available. A low-power station's better than no station, especially in times of emergency.
 

merlin

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Jul 3, 2003
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South East Idaho
I just bought a second 16 outlet plug strip from Amazon. the 20 amp breaker will trip before the 25 amp service breaker does. These run my whole room with equipment/workbench.
73s
 

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