Power supply for Yaesu FT-8800

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19dsniper

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I am in the same boat and also looking for a power supply for my Yaesu FT-8800R. It states that it needs 15 Volts continuous. I have read other places where they recommend 16, 22,23, 35 amp power supplies for this specific radio. Are power supplies adjustable or will the radio only draw whatever it needs, allowing the power supply to run at a lower duty cycle? Basically, for someone who is looking for a power supply, should we purchase one that is as close to (or just over) our rated needs, or are we ok to get one that is rated higher without the concern of frying anything?

TDENFUNNY:
If you would rather me move this question to a new thread, I will. Im not trying to derail the conversation. I have the same question and I'm hoping for some more clarification like you are.
 

captainmax1

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The 8800RTransceiver only uses 8.5 amps at full power so anything with 10 or more amps will easily take care of it. I bought a few 19 amp power supplies from Radio Shack when they were going out of business for 80% off just to have several on standby.
 

mmckenna

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I am in the same boat and also looking for a power supply for my Yaesu FT-8800R. It states that it needs 15 Volts continuous.
I think you meant 15 amps?


I have read other places where they recommend 16, 22,23, 35 amp power supplies for this specific radio.
You need, at minimum, what the radio draws.

However, there are a couple of things to consider…

- Make sure you are looking at the "continuous" rated capacity. Some manufacturers will use the surge capacity. Surge capacity is what the power supply will provide for a short time.

- Consider all other gear you may add to your radio system. While a 16 amp continuous rated power supply will run that radio without any issues, you will very likely want to add more radios in the future. Consider getting a larger power supply now, as it will be cheaper in the long run.
Figure that a 100 watt HF radio will pull somewhere above 25 amps. While it's unlikely you'd be transmitting with more than one radio at a time, keep that in the back of your mind.


Are power supplies adjustable or will the radio only draw whatever it needs, allowing the power supply to run at a lower duty cycle? Basically, for someone who is looking for a power supply, should we purchase one that is as close to (or just over) our rated needs, or are we ok to get one that is rated higher without the concern of frying anything?
Think of it as a water tank. You can run a 10,000 gallon tank with a 4" pipe going to a hose bib and let a little water trickle out. It won't hurt anything. If you ever decided to wanted to connect a 2 inch fire hose to it, you'd be fine.

The radio will only draw what it needs, so going larger is not only OK, it may be a really good idea, like I mentioned above.


Also, they do make power supplies with a connection for a 12 volt battery. These are a "battery revert" type supply. You can hook up a 12 volt battery that the supply will keep charged, and the power supply will power the radio off the battery if your utility power is interrupted. May not be what you need, but it's an option.
 

19dsniper

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I think you meant 15 amps?




You need, at minimum, what the radio draws.

However, there are a couple of things to consider…

- Make sure you are looking at the "continuous" rated capacity. Some manufacturers will use the surge capacity. Surge capacity is what the power supply will provide for a short time.

- Consider all other gear you may add to your radio system. While a 16 amp continuous rated power supply will run that radio without any issues, you will very likely want to add more radios in the future. Consider getting a larger power supply now, as it will be cheaper in the long run.
Figure that a 100 watt HF radio will pull somewhere above 25 amps. While it's unlikely you'd be transmitting with more than one radio at a time, keep that in the back of your mind.




Think of it as a water tank. You can run a 10,000 gallon tank with a 4" pipe going to a hose bib and let a little water trickle out. It won't hurt anything. If you ever decided to wanted to connect a 2 inch fire hose to it, you'd be fine.

The radio will only draw what it needs, so going larger is not only OK, it may be a really good idea, like I mentioned above.


Also, they do make power supplies with a connection for a 12 volt battery. These are a "battery revert" type supply. You can hook up a 12 volt battery that the supply will keep charged, and the power supply will power the radio off the battery if your utility power is interrupted. May not be what you need, but it's an option.
Excellent information!'
You are correct, i meant to state 15 amp. I had to go back and look at it again. It states 15A continuous at 13.8V DC. I didn't know they made amps with built in back up power/ reserve battery. Definitely something I'm interested in. Thank you for the clear explanation.
 

robertmac

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As has previously mentioned, look at the power supply with the most umph that you can afford. In the future you may require one that has more amps.. I run an HF and a VHF/UHF off of one power supply. Certainly not for transmitting at same time, but saves having to use 2 power supplies which could cost more than one.
 
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