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President Virginia UP (formerly New York) compact mobile magnet mount antenna

FPR1981

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
478
As I was killing time recently, I was watching some videos on the President Virginia UP (formerly called the "New York") compact mobile CB antenna. It was reviewed by a couple of experienced radio operators and they had decent things to say about it. I found that fascinating, considering that the whip is just shy of 20 inches and it looks more like a modern AM/FM antenna.

Both reviewers seemed surprised at the decent amount of range they were able to get out of it. President claims a rating of 250-watts P.E.P., but I think I'd be afraid to hit this little guy with more than 100. I also noted that it uses a very thin coaxial cable, which would also concern me.

While I personally would not choose this antenna on MY vehicle, I see this as a great compromise for the married CBer, who wants to put a discreet rig in the wife or girlfriend's vehicle. Has anyone here tested one of these?



Part of me wants to drop the 70 bucks to try one out.
 

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Ctsearay

Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2013
Messages
40
Location
Orange, Ct
Very cool find! I'll have to check it out. I always keep a mag mount antenna in the go bag in the back of the truck with a mini radio in it. Thanks for the tip
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Messages
4,480
I cannot imagine that antenna, especially its flimsy coax withstanding 250 watts, especially if the VSWR is elevated. At 20 inches it is less than 20% of a 1/4 CB whip antenna. The efficiency is going to be into the way negative numbers.
 

FPR1981

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
478
I cannot imagine that antenna, especially its flimsy coax withstanding 250 watts, especially if the VSWR is elevated. At 20 inches it is less than 20% of a 1/4 CB whip antenna. The efficiency is going to be into the way negative numbers.
My understanding is that this antenna will not have SWR issues because it is "pre-tuned" in a manner akin to using a matcher. Everyone who has unboxed and tested one shows an almost perfect 1.1 to 1.

It uses a dual helical whip, meaning there's a bunch of small wire tightly wrapped inside to satisfy the scientific specifications for 1/4-wavelength, probably not much different than a rubber duck antenna on a handheld.
 
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