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Question about GMRS attic antenna

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AGC21980

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Joined
May 12, 2014
Messages
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Hello all, new to the site here!

I have a question in regards to an attic antenna for GMRS. I am obtaining my license and would like to install an attic monted antenna for a base station. The house is a rental and I am not allowed to install anything exterior, but did get the OK to use attic space. I only have maybe 4 feet or so of height right at the peak.

My question is, I have been reading up on antennas and antenna gain. Due to the height, I could only use what they call a unity gain fiberglass base staion antenna. A ham friend of mine suggested finding a large metal or aluminum plate, drill the center and install a 5bd UHF mobile radio antenna in the center, and install that in the attic thus giving me "gain".

What do you all think is the best route and best performer? A fiberglass base antenna or the mobile antenna idea?

Thanks in advance!!
 

ermin

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Joined
Dec 21, 2007
Messages
358
Location
Jacksonville Florida
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 6_1_4 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/536.26 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/6.0 Mobile/10B350 Safari/8536.25)

Try this

http://www.rfparts.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=SVU4500SP1

73

Ed
 

retiredinsemo

Member
Joined
May 3, 2014
Messages
21
I recommend an Arrow Dual Band J Pole antenna. It may not have the most gain, etc. but is very easy to install/remove. I used one for several months in an attic setting similar to yours with good results. Moreover, it's a rock solid product that give excellent SWR returns. There's several models available based on your frequency requirements.

Arrow Antennas JPole 2m 70cm Dual Band Repeater FM
 

WA0CBW

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Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
1,356
Location
Shawnee Kansas (Kansas City)
Some antennas require a "ground plane" and some do not. A typical mobile antenna requires a ground plane to provide the other half of the antenna. A ground plane does not "add" gain to an antenna. Some base station antennas don't require a ground plane. Antenna gain is a function of the antenna design and may or may not require a ground plane. Gain in a mobile antenna is usually achieved by stacking 1/4, 1/2, or 5/8 wave elements on top of each other. Adding a metal ground plane under a mobile antenna would improve its effectiveness. A ground plane needs to be a minimum of a 1/4 wavelength. A base station antenna that uses multiple phased "trombone" or dipole elements doesn't require a ground plane. Gain in this type of antenna is achieved by the multiple phased elements.
 

cmdrwill

Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
3,718
Location
So Cali
The FG400x series are a overpriced fiberglass fixed antenna with 18 gauge steel wire with piss poor copper plating inside.

"5/8 wave stacked" .. who the hell are they kidding.
 
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