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Question about pilot lingo...

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302HO

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Am an aircraft fan.

I have heard this on my Icom but dont know what it means.

"delta 1182 at 4000 with DELTA"

"united 110 decending to 2000 with WHISKEY"

What does "delta" and "whiskey" mean?

Please explain.....

thank you.
 

KR4BD

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What does "delta" and "whiskey" mean?

These are codes for the current airport conditions, wind, runway useage, etc., for the airport that the plane is landing into. The pilot is acknowledging he has copied all the current info regarding landing which is continuously transmitted from every major airport on a set frequency (Usually in the 120 mHz range) for that airport. This continuous loop is usually changed every hour or when conditions warrant. By telling the tower he has "Whiskey" he means he has copied the transmission called "Whiskey" telling him which runway is in use and other current landing conditions. I am sure someone else can give a better explanation, but this pretty much covers it.
 

CLB

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Goose Creek SC
302HO said:
Am an aircraft fan.

I have heard this on my Icom but dont know what it means.

"delta 1182 at 4000 with DELTA"

"united 110 decending to 2000 with WHISKEY"

What does "delta" and "whiskey" mean?

Please explain.....

thank you.
ATIS (Automated Terminal Information Service...or something along those lines) Generally every hour, the tower will record an automated weather/ traffic/ NOTAM, etc.. message and stamp it with a letter designator. Alpha for A, Delta for D, Wiskey for W.....They change every hour or when the situation warrants, thus making that mesage the next letter in the alphabet.

So when you hear "Tower, Delta 2535 inbound to land, runway 15 with Alpha", you'll know that the aircraft has information Alpha.

Check this out....more info.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_Terminal_Information_Service
 

NAVCAN

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CLB said:
ATIS (Automated Terminal Information Service...or something along those lines) Generally every hour, the tower will record an automated weather/ traffic/ NOTAM, etc.. message and stamp it with a letter designator. Alpha for A, Delta for D, Wiskey for W.....They change every hour or when the situation warrants, thus making that mesage the next letter in the alphabet.

So when you hear "Tower, Delta 2535 inbound to land, runway 15 with Alpha", you'll know that the aircraft has information Alpha.

Check this out....more info.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_Terminal_Information_Service
That is correct. ATIS even tells you to tell ATC that you have information "Alpha, Bravo, ect..."!!

Cheers.
 

KCChiefs9690

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The localizer is a radio signal that is received by a special indicator in the ****pit, and in bad weather, is used to guide the plane to the runway, even if the pilots do not see the runway (like in the clouds). How it works is the indicator contains a needle that swings either left or right. Which ever way it points is the direction the pilots need to turn the plane to align it with the runway. If the needle is in the middle of the indicator, it means the plane is properly aligned with the runway.

Localizers are usually coupled with glideslopes, which are the same as localizers, exept it provides up/down guidance. The glideslope and the localizer needles are on the same indicator, so it makes it easy for the pilot to interpret.

Hope this helps,
 

bob1857

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Thanks..cleared it up. I heard it today..pilot said he would contact localizer at so and so..I appreciate the info.
 

buffalogoat

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If you really want to hear alot of "codes" & air traffic control "lingo", go to www.atcmonitor.com
Here, you can listen live to air traffic control at the busiest airport in the world! Atlanta Hartsfield Airport. There is always alot of action and you can learn alot!
 

petrolero

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This is a link to the Aeronautical Information Manual published by the FAA:

http://www.faa.gov/ATPubs/AIM/

It has just all kinds of aviation knowledge in it, including how some of this technology is used by pilots, how it works, etc. Lots of stuff for those who are curious. I am I pilot and I am constantly learning new things from the AIM.

There are a few general frequencies in it, but the bulk of aviation frequencies are published in the Airport/Facilities Directory (the green book), of course.

Also, a Pilot/Controller Glossary:

http://www.atlasaviation.com/AviationLibrary/Glossary/PilotGlossary.htm?area=24
 
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NAVCAN

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KCChiefs9690 said:
The localizer is a radio signal that is received by a special indicator in the ****pit, and in bad weather, is used to guide the plane to the runway, even if the pilots do not see the runway (like in the clouds). How it works is the indicator contains a needle that swings either left or right. Which ever way it points is the direction the pilots need to turn the plane to align it with the runway. If the needle is in the middle of the indicator, it means the plane is properly aligned with the runway.

Localizers are usually coupled with glideslopes, which are the same as localizers, exept it provides up/down guidance. The glideslope and the localizer needles are on the same indicator, so it makes it easy for the pilot to interpret.

Hope this helps,
That is exactly correct. The only real difference between a localiser is the antenna array and the operating frequency. Localisers are VHF and glideslopes are UHF.

Pics for smiles :)
Glideslope

Localiser.


The glideslope has 3 antenna's, and the localiser has 16 antenna to basically so the same thing. When both needles are in the middle of the guage, it means that the aircraft is 3 degrees with refence to the ground, and aligned down the centerline of the runway.
 

302HO

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hey man....
thats cool. thanks for the pics.

i've an antenna setup like that at bluegrass airport. i always wondered what it was.

Okay experts....how bout this?

"delta1187 bla bla bla...HEAVY" whats the "heavy" mean?


thanks for the help guys.......and thanks for the pics.
 

trainman111

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There's probably a better explanation for this but as I know it, heavy usually denotes a larger aircraft. For example, a 767 or a 747 may be a "heavy" plane

Hope that helped!
Nick
 

NAVCAN

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heavy means big plane yup. However, I think it means that it is FULLY loaded of either cargo or people!
 

sflmonitor

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HEAVY refers to aircraft that have a takeoff weight exceeding 255,000 lbs. This includes the 747, 757, 767, 777, some Airbus equipment, L1011, DC10,etc.
 
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TinEar

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Aircraft are categorised by ICAO according to the amount of wake turbulence they produce. Because wake turbulence is generally related to the weight of an aircraft, these categories are based on weight - aircraft with a maximum certificated take-off weight of 300,000lb (136,000kg) or more are classed as Heavy, those between 15,500lb and 300,000lb (7,000kg and 136,000kg) are classed as Medium, and those below 15,500lb (7,000kg) are classed as Light. Due to their weight, all current wide-body aircraft are categorised as Heavy (in addition, the narrowbody Boeing 757, while not being a Heavy by weight, is classed as Heavy due to the amount of wake turbulence it creates).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide-body_aircraft
 

doug43qld

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Thanks petrolero ,and kc8mzm for the web site info top stuff , and to navcan for the good photos of stuff we dont get to see close up top stuff .
 

Yokoshibu

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Yeah tin ear has it right... I thought it was 250000 but yeah it is 300000+ gets the "Heavy" appended to the callsign!
 

VintageJon

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I suspect "delta" refers to Delta Airlines. (Didn't see it addressed above.)

We hear Delta, Southwest, American here, and in San Antone quiet often...

-Jon
 
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