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Question re: Midland MXT275 remote mount GMRS mobile radio

gumshoe4

Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2005
Messages
6
Greetings, all. I'm thinking about getting the radio described above for installation in a vehicle with no good place to mount a conventional radio.

I am aware that the Midland mobile rigs cannot do split tones...not a big deal in this area...however, there is a repeater which uses a DTCSS tone on the input, but nothing on the output. This is potentially a problem if the radio's tone control automatically programs both input and output on the same tone, since I would then not be able to hear the output...the output tone in the radio would mute it.

I'd like to know if the Midland will allow itself to programmed that way (tone on input, carrier squelch on output), or if that would also be considered splitting tones, from the radio's software perspective. Thanks in advance for all your help

73 de WRFJ682
 

tweiss3

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
79
Location
Ohio
Greetings, all. I'm thinking about getting the radio described above for installation in a vehicle with no good place to mount a conventional radio.

I am aware that the Midland mobile rigs cannot do split tones...not a big deal in this area...however, there is a repeater which uses a DTCSS tone on the input, but nothing on the output. This is potentially a problem if the radio's tone control automatically programs both input and output on the same tone, since I would then not be able to hear the output...the output tone in the radio would mute it.

I'd like to know if the Midland will allow itself to programmed that way (tone on input, carrier squelch on output), or if that would also be considered splitting tones, from the radio's software perspective. Thanks in advance for all your help

73 de WRFJ682
What you describe is split tones. With the Midland, it's same tone in and out, or all off.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Messages
3,944
A problem with the Midland radios is that they are narrow band. GMRS service allows 16K0F3E which is a wide band emission +/- 5.0 KHz deviation. Most GMRS repeaters are wide band because the performance is better and most commercial grade radios are capable of wide band. Using a Midland radio on a wide band system might work but there are potentially two problems.

1) The modulation will be weak and noisy because the Midland TX deviation is only +/- 2.5 KHz , 1/2 the modulation and that unused bandwidth will be occupied with channel noise.

2) The DCS or CTCSS decoder of the repeater is expecting to see 800 to 1000 Hz subaudible deviation from the mobile and the mobile is sending 400 to 500 Hz deviation. So the repeater may be erratic in decoding the DCS or CTCSS.

You can buy many used Kenwood mobiles that are Part 95 certified. The only difficulty is getting them programmed.

As much as I like the MXT275 radio, the fact that is narrow band has me using Kenwood, Motorola Saber, and Spectra (Part 90). Also Ritron has Part 95 wide band radios.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Messages
3,944
What you describe is split tones. With the Midland, it's same tone in and out, or all off.
I have not checked, but most commercial grade radios will defeat RX coded squelch if the Mike is removed from the hang up bracket. This to provide monitoring of the channel before TX . If Midland does not provide a monitor function like this, automatically, or via button, they dont provide the licensee the capability to monitor the channel. Something the FCC has considered in denying certain operations.
 

alcahuete

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jul 24, 2015
Messages
1,069
Location
Antelope Acres, California
Another great thing about the commercial radios is that many have detatchable faces. So if you are unable to mount a conventional radio, just throw the body under the seat, or trunk, or wherever, and run the remote face somewhere convenient. Way easier to mount just the face of the radio than an entire radio, body and all.
 

gumshoe4

Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2005
Messages
6
Thanks for the info, guys. You confirmed what I was thinking. Guess we'll have to look at alternative ways of doing things.
 
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