Yaesu: Quick do start ?

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Delivers1234

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Quick Start

I have my yaesu ftm100dr and x30 antanne set up at home. I have my tech. What do I need to do to get started?
 
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N2AL

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I have my yaesu ftm100dr and x30 antanne set up at home. I have my tech. What do I need to do to get started?


Good morning!

My first question I suppose, is what are you wanting to do?

If you have your Technician license you can use the amateur band portions of 2 meters and 70 centimeters. You can use these and portions for simplex, or my favorite, repeater operations.

A good start if you are not sure of local repeaters, is the RadioReference database, and RepeaterBook.com (also has an app for your smartphone).

From there just program in repeaters, call CQ, and stand by!
 

Delivers1234

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Good morning!

My first question I suppose, is what are you wanting to do?

If you have your Technician license you can use the amateur band portions of 2 meters and 70 centimeters. You can use these and portions for simplex, or my favorite, repeater operations.

A good start if you are not sure of local repeaters, is the RadioReference database, and RepeaterBook.com (also has an app for your smartphone).

From there just program in repeaters, call CQ, and stand by!


I tried. Not use to programming. Will try again.
 

jim202

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I tried. Not use to programming. Will try again.
Don't forget that many repeaters require a CTCSS tone to be able to key up the repeater. Problem with most of the databases is that this tone information is either missing or is wrong. But you can try using the ham call listed for that repeater and do a search on the Internet to see if you can confirm the tone information for the repeater you want to use.

I have been traveling around the country for many years and over time, i have updated my own listing for the repeaters along the routes I frequent. I use the program "Street Atlas" and have inserted map tags with the repeater frequency info and tone onto the map for the locations they are at. Little by little over the years I have corrected the information and programmed my radio accordingly.

It's too bad that the owner and others don't care about having the correct information posted about their repeaters. You can also find state, regional and ham club lists by doing this search. But even these are not always correct.

What you can also do is get on a repeater in the area and ask those your talking to about another repeater frequency. This is how I have obtained a good portion of my corrected frequency and tone information. You will run into some odd split info on a few repeaters. Not that common, but they are out there.

I use a Motorola radio that I have to pre-program for the area I am in. It does let me break the channels down into zones that I change as I drive around. Normally I have between 10 and 15 channels in a zone. With the radio able to hold 50 zones, it does allow me to cover a good amount of an area I travel in. If I go outside my normal area, I just load in a saved codeplug for the area not normally in the radio.

Most of the radios on the market today allow you to store a pile of frequencies in them. So it's just a matter of collecting the information for the area you frequent and then spend time with the computer and the radio connected.

Each radio is different on how you do the programming, so can't help you there.

Enjoy your new radio.
 

jonwienke

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If you have a scanner, it will quickly tell you which repeaters are active in your area, as well as what CTCSS/DCS tones they are using.
 

wyShack

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Campbell County, Wyoming
You can find your local repeater frequencies in a variety of ways. an online search for 'amateur radio repeaters' will give you several sites that will list repeaters' output frequencies. A simple call to the group that gave you the test will also likely get the information you need.

After getting the information, program the repeaters into your radio. I would also include 146.52, 446.000 and 448.00 as simplex channels. listen (scanning g helps) to the activity on the repeaters to get an idea of how they are used. Once you know how others are using the machines, go ahead and make your own contacts. The exact procedure will mimic what you have heard.

Have fun and welcome to the hobby.
 

k6cpo

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San Diego, CA
I have my yaesu ftm100dr and x30 antanne set up at home. I have my tech. What do I need to do to get started?
My suggestion is to find a local club and start going to meetings. Once you do this, you will probably find someone willing to help you get started.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ham+radio+clubs,+Monterey,+CA&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

I'm a little concerned with your choice of radio. The FTM-100DR is a lot of radio for a raw beginner. I have one in my truck and even after six years as a ham and holding an Extra Class license, I still find the radio to be a bit overwhelming.
 

Delivers1234

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Sep 18, 2016
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Monterey, CA
My suggestion is to find a local club and start going to meetings. Once you do this, you will probably find someone willing to help you get started.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ham+radio+clubs,+Monterey,+CA&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

I'm a little concerned with your choice of radio. The FTM-100DR is a lot of radio for a raw beginner. I have one in my truck and even after six years as a ham and holding an Extra Class license, I still find the radio to be a bit overwhelming.


Please be my elmer.
 

k6cpo

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San Diego, CA
Please be my elmer.
I'll try to offer you suggestions, but it's going to be difficult doing it via the internet. You would be better served finding someone local that could help you hands-on.

Once you have compiled a list of the repeaters you want to put into your radio, you can either program them by hand (a complicated process for someone new) or you can use programming software. While Yaesu does produce software for this radio, the programming software from RT Systems is head and shoulders above anything else out there. (Link below.)

There are two ways to program the FTM-100 from software. You can either use the SCU-20 cable that came with the radio or you can write the programming to a MicroSD card, insert it into the radio and read the files from it. I find using the MicroSD card easier because it means I don't have to carry a computer out to my truck when I want to make changes.

https://www.rtsystemsinc.com/FTM-100-programming-software-and-USB-cable-s/2409.htm

There are two ways to go with RT Systems. You can buy the software and MicroSD card w/reader or just the software alone. Your choice.

The software is very easy to use, especially if you've had any experience with Microsoft Excel. Another nice feature of the RT Systems software is you can copy and pate information from one radio programmer to another. I have several dual band radios and I use the same layout for all of them. A couple of things to remember is that when using cables to program other radios, their software only works with their cables and it only runs on a Windows platform.

I've included a lot of information for you to digest. Good luck.
 

Delivers1234

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Joined
Sep 18, 2016
Messages
240
Location
Monterey, CA
I'll try to offer you suggestions, but it's going to be difficult doing it via the internet. You would be better served finding someone local that could help you hands-on.

Once you have compiled a list of the repeaters you want to put into your radio, you can either program them by hand (a complicated process for someone new) or you can use programming software. While Yaesu does produce software for this radio, the programming software from RT Systems is head and shoulders above anything else out there. (Link below.)

There are two ways to program the FTM-100 from software. You can either use the SCU-20 cable that came with the radio or you can write the programming to a MicroSD card, insert it into the radio and read the files from it. I find using the MicroSD card easier because it means I don't have to carry a computer out to my truck when I want to make changes.

https://www.rtsystemsinc.com/FTM-100-programming-software-and-USB-cable-s/2409.htm

There are two ways to go with RT Systems. You can buy the software and MicroSD card w/reader or just the software alone. Your choice.

The software is very easy to use, especially if you've had any experience with Microsoft Excel. Another nice feature of the RT Systems software is you can copy and pate information from one radio programmer to another. I have several dual band radios and I use the same layout for all of them. A couple of things to remember is that when using cables to program other radios, their software only works with their cables and it only runs on a Windows platform.

I've included a lot of information for you to digest. Good luck.



I listened to others.
 

Delivers1234

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Sep 18, 2016
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Monterey, CA
I went online today!!! I finally connected with a repeater (Salinas Valley Group). the repeaterbook did help when i used it on a desktop. it gave the tones. on the iphone app, i don't see them. in the above picture, i moved the antanne to the center of the patio. I am getting 2m and 70cm signals. yes! im strongly thinking of buying the software for the sd card. thanks to all. very helpful information.
 
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