Radio Electronics

Status
Not open for further replies.

kynix

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2016
Messages
2
I'm a beginner in radio electronics. I have basic experience building circuits with both passive and active components. Audio Products- Kynix Semiconductor Hong Kong Limited.

I was wondering if it was at all possible to build your own transmitter, receiver, etc. (basic radio components) as a good beginner project. For now, I'll start with AM radio.

I've searched the Internet for tutorials, but the links have either made it seem too complicated or they aren't actually simple.

Anyways, if you all could refer me to some beginner material, that would be great.

By the way, if my question is too vague, let me know and I can edit it. I'm new to the whole Stack Exchange too.
 

ladn

Explorer of the Frequency Spectrum
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Oct 25, 2008
Messages
673
Location
Southern California and sometimes Owens Valley
Yes, your question is vague. The short answer is, yes it's possible to build "basic" radio components. I'm sure other posters will go into details on this ad infinitum, but the practicality of this depends on what you consider "basic" and what radio service you want to build for.

The "Radio Amateur's Handbook", published by the ARRL (https://www.arrl.org/shop/ARRL-Handbook-2016-Hardcover-Edition/) would be a good place to look for projects. Your local public library should have copies.
 

SteveC0625

Order of the Golden Dino since 1972
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Oct 24, 2009
Messages
2,728
Location
Northville, NY (Fulton County)
(You didn't specify your location in your post or in your profile. Best to do that so folks here can offer more useful and pertinent information to you.)

Building your own transmitter equipment is pretty much limited to the Amateur Radio Service here in the US. Most any other radio service in the US requires FCC certification of the transmitter which is an expensive process usually accomplished by the manufacturers. Most other countries have similar requirements.

If we're talking Amateur gear (which you did not specify), remember that the FCC requires that transmitters not interfere with any other systems. To do that, the radio needs to be tested for things like on-frequency, deviation, spurious emissions, and more. In the Amateur service, this falls directly on the licensee's shoulders So if you build a transmitter, you need to have access to the necessary equipment to fully test the radio before operating it.
 

jwt873

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
1,152
Location
Woodlands, MB
Apart from ham radio, low powered transmitters are allowed on the AM and FM broadcast bands. I don't know if they need to be type accepted, but hey, as long as you don't cause any interference :) Here's a plan for a low powered AM transmitter A low power AM transmitter for the broadcast band

I built an AM receiver years ago by assembling a simple crystal radio Crystal Radios "Stay Tuned" Crystal Sets and then feeding the output to a little amplifier I built that was powerful enough to drive a speaker. I'm dating myself, but it was a tube amp that I built :) Now you can make an amp around a single IC
Audio power amplifier circuit using Hi Fi audio amplifier IC TDA2613

And as mentioned above.. In most places you need an amateur license to build higher powered transmitting equipment. There are many ham radio publications with plans on how to do this. The ARRL has a pretty good assortment https://www.arrl.org/shop/What-s-New
 

wyShack

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
438
Location
Campbell County, Wyoming
kynix-

Making your own radio equipment can be very educational. I do not know where you are located but simple receivers are not difficult. the real issue is that the cost of building your own is higher than buying by the time you figure cost of tools and test equipment. There are several outlets for kits (Ramsey electronics comes to mid). but if you were to Google 'receiver kit' you are sure to get hits.

Another issue is that todays electronics uses a lot of specialty ICs which are often custom made for that piece of equipment-If I were to try to build a transceiver with all the features of the 'commercial' units, it would be a lot larger and cost a lot more. Home 'brewing 'is still quite possible, but can't compute with the 'big boys' for features and price-similar to building your own car-racers do it all time.

Hope this helps
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top