Radio vs Phone Patch

Status
Not open for further replies.

newtoscanning

Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2007
Messages
155
This question applies to both the Toronto Public Safety Network, and the provincial GMCP.

When doing hospital patches (for what ever reason) why don't they just use a phone patch?

They would save money on the hardware costs of having to install a radio and remote in each hospital (sometimes two in the case of GTA, 1 800mhz, 1 VHF). They would also save the trouble of staff not knowing how to use the radios.

Since the dispatchers have to initiate the patch, and kill it as well, I don't see why the couldn't just call on a land line, then patch it in to the medcom talkgroup on whatever system. Then kill it when it's done. I think this would also add more flexibility if patches wanted to be initiated to other parts of the hospital or docs' not near the remote.

The only benefit I can see to having an actual radio at each hospital is so that if the landlines go down then they can still talk to the hospitals. However, if all of the landlines go down feeding a hospital wouldn't there be bigger issues at hand other than getting a request from a field medic. (hell I know the hospitals in Toronto are their own ISP, there's a tone of connectivity required to feed a hospital (at least a level 1-2 trauma center)

Thanks!
 

hfxChris

Member
Database Admin
Joined
Aug 18, 2007
Messages
1,308
Location
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Good question. They have radios in each hospital each with their own talkgroup for EHS here in Nova Scotia, but they're only used for check-ins. If a paramedic requests to speak to a physician for advice or permission to do something while en route, dispatch does a phone patch.
I guess one problem with a phone patch is, what if the phone is busy?
 

MetalCarnage

Member
Joined
May 12, 2005
Messages
735
Location
Ajax Ontario
hfx_chris said:
Good question. They have radios in each hospital each with their own talkgroup for EHS here in Nova Scotia, but they're only used for check-ins. If a paramedic requests to speak to a physician for advice or permission to do something while en route, dispatch does a phone patch.
I guess one problem with a phone patch is, what if the phone is busy?
Even beyond that, what if there is a terrorist attack and the telecommunications system gets destroyed, radio systems can run off backup power from both the vehicles and hospitals (and in the case of fleetnet backup power for dispatch and transmitters). I would rather have them spend a couple of bucks on a radio for each hospital and be able to contact the hospital then have no communication at all. I think since the radio system is more self reliant and seperate to other communication systems it makes it a safer way of communication in my personal opinion, since phone systems can fail.....and a comment on the original post, is it that hard to train staff? Press button, talk, release button....doesnt seem to difficult to me, peoples ipods and blackberrys are probably more complicated to use then a simple radio.
 

imcleish

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2004
Messages
264
Location
Durham Region and Parry Sound, Ontario
Answer,

For Toronto EMS and parts of Ontario, Paramedic to Physician patch is available by Land Line or 2-Way Radio.

The choice of patch type is often chosen by the paramedic, they are aware of their radios limits and the sensitivity of their patch. If you are not mobile and in a home, requestng a pronouncement you normally use a phone patch, if you are in the field/mobile to hospital, you use a radio. A benefit of the radio patch is that the dispatcher can hear the information being exchanged between Physician and Paramedic, and update the receiving facility prior to your arrival if they are not the patch centre. In Toronto, Paramedics initiate the patch on their portable radio, using the 800mhz system. Sunnybrook does not have a VHF/GMCP/Fleetnet Radio. Some of the Dispatcher/Paramedic related communications on patching is more related to the Dispatcher knowing where the crew is in radio la la land, if you forget to switch your radio back to the standby channel after a patch, it may take a while to find you.

For Toronto EMS, the patch centre is located at Sunnybrook Hospital, for ornge/air ambulance, the patch centre is located at 20 Carlson Court, near PIA (Their Communications Centre and Office). City of Hamilton previously was at McMaster, and Peel Region was at Peel Memorial.
 
Last edited:
N

nec208

Guest
Why is it some times you hear a beep beep sound when they do a patch to BCH in Brampton?

But the old PMH did not have that beep beep sound after the patch ?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top