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Radius m1225 station found in the trash

Joined
Jun 16, 2013
Messages
3,626
Location
Texas
It depends on the vintage of the radio; if I recall correctly the M1225 models are narrow-band compliant, and if so they would still be perfectly good. Best way to find out is run the FCC ID through the FCC database and check the authorized emissions.

If it's still good for narrowband I'm a bit surprised someone would just chuck it in the dumpster. You got a heck of a find; the power supply alone is worth a few bucks.



Pretty sure that power supply "hood" over the radio is just a shell that comes off and leaves an ordinary power supply; if necessary you could pull the "hood" off and use the power supply for other stuff without worrying about fit.
The M1225's are narrowband capable. That being said, just because it's narrowband capable doesn't mean it's practical for anyone to use in a commercial environment. I can't tell you how many thousands of radios I've chunked in the trash due to customers upgrading to digital and no longer having a need for the radio (remember most of them had already completely written the radios cost off in taxes so they technically couldn't sell them). As far as keeping them going...in many cases it's not worthwhile to keep a 25 year old radio in operation in this day and age. For one, you have many large radio dealers which have completely removed the computers bench and field techs needed to program and align these radios. In cases where shops can still work on them, you often see "legacy radio" fees to cover the costs of maintaining those now defunct OSes and hardware they run on and by the time it's all said and done a repair can cost more than the cost of just purchasing a new radio.

Just as an example, between 2015 and 2019, I didn't do a single Mag One repair because by the time the customer got charged the diagnostics fee, the materials for the repair and the labor to actually perform the repair and re-align the radio...it was the same price to sell them a new Mag One.
 

com501

Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Messages
1,364
Location
127.0.0.1
We're lucky to be able to get parts for a 10 year old radio, even now. More parts for newer radios aren't available or the schematics are restricted. Look at the MAg One. The radio cost is around $150, same as the flat rate fee. Where does a shop make any money?
 

merlin

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2003
Messages
478
Location
South East Idaho
And I thought those days were over. I would sometimes dumpster dive behind a local com shop and usually came up with something. One time was after a clean house thing and got a bunch of mobils, Deltas, mocom 70s, Master parts and assemblies, Micor base, old service manuals, new in box desk mic's.
And it all worked. My car would only hold so much.
 
Joined
Sep 27, 2019
Messages
139
Location
SE Arizona
And I thought those days were over. I would sometimes dumpster dive behind a local com shop and usually came up with something. One time was after a clean house thing and got a bunch of mobils, Deltas, mocom 70s, Master parts and assemblies, Micor base, old service manuals, new in box desk mic's.
And it all worked. My car would only hold so much.
I never got that lucky, but I did score some TK-190s, TK-980v1s, and a pile of CBs from a site we were cleaning out in preparation for closure. They'd written the TK-190s off as dead because of the batteries and roached antennas; I had a personal TK-390 in my truck with a charged battery and confirmed they were all functional. Still got sent home with the things!
 

N4KVE

Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2003
Messages
3,459
Location
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
And I thought those days were over. I would sometimes dumpster dive behind a local com shop and usually came up with something. One time was after a clean house thing and got a bunch of mobils, Deltas, mocom 70s, Master parts and assemblies, Micor base, old service manuals, new in box desk mic's.
And it all worked. My car would only hold so much.
Sounds like I guy I know, Andrew. After the narrow banding deadline, he went dumpster diving behind a 2-way shop & took home a bunch of perfectly fine Maxtrac’s.
 
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