• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Railroads around me are dead.

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Chev_am

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I live in Schenectady/Albany, New York. The current frquencies for railroads have maybe some scattered voices on them every week for a couple of seconds. Does anyone have any good busy frequencies for that region?

Thanks
 

trainman111

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Well, there are a bunch of factors that could be causing this problem:

1) The right frequencies...depending on how many channels you have free, I would program all 97 AAR channels (if you need these let me know)

2) How far you are from the tracks.

3) What antenna you are using. There are many different types of antennas that railfans like to use, it all depends on what you like.

4) Of course, geographical features. Since that area of NY is pretty hilly, depending on whats between you and the tracks depends on how much you hear.

5) Coax. Theres a section in the wiki about coax. Junk coax won't cut it.

I know for a fact that there is alot of radio action in that area. I have been in that area several times and I heard quite a bit. if you have any other questions just ask!


Good luck!
Nick
 

Chev_am

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trainman111 said:
Well, there are a bunch of factors that could be causing this problem:

1) The right frequencies...depending on how many channels you have free, I would program all 97 AAR channels (if you need these let me know)

2) How far you are from the tracks.

3) What antenna you are using. There are many different types of antennas that railfans like to use, it all depends on what you like.

4) Of course, geographical features. Since that area of NY is pretty hilly, depending on whats between you and the tracks depends on how much you hear.

5) Coax. Theres a section in the wiki about coax. Junk coax won't cut it.

I know for a fact that there is alot of radio action in that area. I have been in that area several times and I heard quite a bit. if you have any other questions just ask!


Good luck!
Nick
I'm not far from the tracks at all, A couple of blocks maybe.

I'm using a Center loaded telescoping whip on a PRO-94
and those AAR frequencies would be really nice. I have room for them.

Thanks
 

DaveNF2G

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Rensselaer, NY
There are several abandoned lines in the Albany area.

My website (critics beware - here comes another "plug") has frequencies and a map of the active lines in the Capital District.

http://nf2g.com/scannist/index.html - click on Frequencies, then Albany, then Transportation, then follow your nose.
 

kc2kvz

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Here is a link to a page which lists the Selkirk Yard frequencies. www.crisny.org/not-for-profit/railroad/se_ra_in.htm There are links there to other parts of the site which list mor information about this area. It's a good reference and also gives you some idea about what you are hearing, mile posts, detectors etc. Depending on your location, you may hear a lot, or a little- just depends on your setup and location. More traffic is at night around here too- after 9pm, the mainline west from Selkirk usually kicks in with several trains. Hope this helps. Good luck and stay safe!
 

kb2vxa

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Hi Chev and railfans,

To find active frequencies in your area you search for them, right? Search from 160.215 to 161.565 and log what you hear, computer control and search logging software is helpful. That gives you a starting point you can use to find what each is used for and http://www.railroadradio.net/ is a good place to look.

Just because you live near the tracks doesn't mean a thing if the closest tower is many miles away. Fixed transmitter locations depend on the railroad and where they are determines what you hear, right? I live a block away from New Jersey Transit's Shore Line and have two yards and several towers within range and Conrail (CSX/NS Shared Assets) isn't far but the transmissions on a freight line are few and far between compared to a passenger line and the transmitters are much farther apart. NJT chatters all the time but Conrail makes a few transmissions in the middle of the night, most of the action is up north and too far to be heard.

One interesting note, you may occasionally hear transmissions on one road's channels but they're actually another that shares trackage and sometimes it's in another area altogether. For example I sometimes hear NJT on Amtrak and Conrail frequencies, thier Trenton Main runs on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and the Port Jervis (NY) Line runs on CSX's Southern Tier. Since they switch to those frequencies when operating there nothing stops them from using them as "private" channels on thier home ground.

"I'm the train they call The Spirit of New Orleans... I'll be gone 500 miles when day is done."
Arlo Guthrie
 

wbigcount

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Here is the link for the AAR Ch's http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/Railroad . Dont worry about the VHF narrowband splinter frequencies for right now, Also dont worry about AAR 02 through 06 unless your in canada, they are not used in the us. As for range, you should be able to here the trains form about 5 miles or so away up to 20 depending on the day. handhelds we only get about 1 to 2 miles out of them, the dispatcher normaly can be heard for a long ways depending on what tower they are using and how good the skip is.
 
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