receiverssss

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whiskeytango

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been reading about all the different receivers and transcievers, and im finding i have more questions than answers...id like to get into ham and diff shortwave applications...is it better to have one that covers more bands, or get multiple radios depending on what bands i want to hear? will a handheld be a decent start or will i need a 873 ft antenna with a base radio to receive in the sacramento valley....bear with me im still learning....thanks
 

FLRAILMAN

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Recieversss

Check the Wiki section on HF receiver reviews. In my experience, portables with HF capability just don't cut it, DC to 30 MHz, stick with a tabletop. Just my newbie ranked opinion.

FLRAILMAN
 
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iMONITOR

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been reading about all the different receivers and transcievers, and im finding i have more questions than answers...id like to get into ham and diff shortwave applications...is it better to have one that covers more bands, or get multiple radios depending on what bands i want to hear? will a handheld be a decent start or will i need a 873 ft antenna with a base radio to receive in the sacramento valley....bear with me im still learning....thanks
Try posting in the amateur radio threads for better response.
 

ka3jjz

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It's far and away better to get separate receivers for different applications. The reason is performance - as alluded to previously, portables have numerous shortcomings - many in the area of strong signal handling and selectivity - and while they might look attractive, do your homework before plunking down your money.

In the ham world, a good 2m/440 handheld with a decent broad receiver will get your feet wet, and allow you to do some public service work as well. But as I mentioned earlier, putting a good outdoor antenna on a handheld in urban areas can overload the radio.

Sarcasm aside, FLRailman got it right - For HF stuff (2-30 mhz) check out the links we have in the wiki on receiver reviews - we got LOTS of them. Get a copy of Passport to World Band Radio - even the 2009 edition will have more than enough information. Click on the link below (anything in blue)

Receiver Reviews

EHam has numerous user-level reviews on a whole gambit of HF and VHF stuff - wander and read.

Antennas are a completely different ballgame, and many are designed for specific applications or sometimes frequency ranges. You will need to be much more specific to get a halfway decent answer as to what you are trying to hear or accomplish

73 Mike
 

mylt1

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im thinking since portability is a higher priority the yaesu vr-500 will probably suit my newb needs for a while....
you do know that the VR-500 is just a receiver and not a transmitter, right? if you get a tech license the only HF you have is a VERY small band for CW, no voice. general opens that up quite a bit but is a harder test. there are study guides all over the web.oh, and to just listen you dont need a license.
 

hill

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Techs can use phone (voice) on a small part of 10 meters and I have listed that freqs below. Just look at a current ARRL or other band use chart. You will hear alot in this range when 10m is open.

28.300-28.500 Mhz

Larry
 
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