Rechargeable batteries

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n1chu

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I purchased batteries made by POWEREX. 2700 mah. They have lasted about 3 years. I am noticing a few are going bad so I "reconditioned" them in my charger that has this reconditioning feature. They are not coming back. I've been working under the premise they should be good for around a thousand charging cycles which, if recharged once a day, would work out to about 3 years. But my estimation puts the amount of recharges at around 500, as I don't recharge the same batteries on a daily basis. And running all of the batteries through the reconditioning process seems to ruin those batteries that still had life in them. It's time to get new batteries. Any recommendations? Is my understanding that I haven't gotten the expected life out of the POWEREX batteries correct?

Bill
 

RFBOSS

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The life time (number of discharge/charge cycles) will vary with the depth of discharge of the batteries and the charging profile of the battery charger used.

The deeper the discharge, the fewer discharge/charge charge cycles will be available.

I took a quick look at the posted information for your batteries and the specification that I found said hundred of cycles, no mention of a 1000 cycles.
 

budevans

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I believe most folks would recommend Eneloop. There are two versions. The AA basic Eneloops which are rated at 2000 mA and the Eneloop Pro which is rated at 2550 mA.

There's a trade off between the 2000 mA and 2500 mA. The 2000 mA will usually be able to do more recharge cycles. But, they have less power than the 2550. So in a per charge daily usage they don't last a long as the 2550. Example if you get 12hrs of use out the 2550, you might get 8hrs out of the 2000.

One other note, regarding the life of the batteries. If you look at the front cover of the packaging it might say 7 year life. But on the back in the fine print it might say 400 recharge cycles. So with minimum usage the battery could last up to 7 years. But once you hit the 400 recharge cycle limit, expect the battery's run time to be greatly reduced. Which is what you've seen with the Powerex.
 

rivardj

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From mahaenergy.com:

The Powerex MHRAA4 Rechargeable AA NiMH Batteries (1.2V, 2700mAh) - 4-Pack is a package of 4 AA nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. They have a voltage of 1.2V and a capacity of 2700mAh. The batteries can be recharged hundreds of times, and because they have memory-free operation, they will not develop memory effect, which can cause batteries to hold less charge. These batteries will retain a charge at or near their full capacities even after hundreds of charges. A battery carrying case is included.

Nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) chemistry.

Voltage of 1.2V and a capacity of 2700mAh.

Batteries can be recharged hundreds of times, and because they have memory-free operation, they will not develop memory effect, which can cause batteries to hold less charge.

These batteries will retain a charge at or near their full capacities even after hundreds of charges.
A battery carrying case is included.


I would say that your cells did pretty well if you were able to use them 500 times. Depth of discharge can also affect the life of a cell. Typically the deeper the discharge over and over again the shorter the life in cycles. It sounds like you treated your cells well to make it to 500 cycles.

I think you have gotten the advertised life expectancy out of the cells, so not correct.

Eneloops, Powerex or Tenergy. The key is to purchase cells that match how you will use them. By that I mean purchase cells that capable of delivering high-current in high current applications and purchase cells that can deliver more mAh at a lower current draw over a longer period in low current applications.
 

tscoma

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Not to hijack the thread but does anyone have a "strong" opinion on charging batts such as Eneloop Pros in the scanner with USB vs removing and externally charging in a branded Eneloop wall charger? I'm charging inside a Whistler TRX-1 with USB and my experience has been that the batt indicator on the scanner is showing full, but quickly (hour or less), starts showing maybe an 80% full indicator. I believe the scanner charging mechanism is timed only vs wall charger checking actual full (indicated by voltage drop off). Just wondering what people's thoughts were?
 

chief21

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+1 on the eneloop batteries. I use them in scanners, but also in seldom-used devices like cameras (real, dedicated cameras... remember those?). Unlike NiCd or NiMH batteries, the newer-technology eneloops hold their charge for a very long time before self-discharging. So they're perfect for the camera I keep in the glove compartment and don't use for months at a time.

As to charging, I ALWAYS use an external charger for removable batteries. The built-in charging circuit in many devices is, to me, often questionable. A quality external charger can be more precise and you can monitor the process. And the heat generated inside the case during the charging process certainly isn't good for most electronics.

John
 

DJ11DLN

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+1 on the eneloop batteries. I use them in scanners, but also in seldom-used devices like cameras (real, dedicated cameras... remember those?). Unlike NiCd or NiMH batteries, the newer-technology eneloops hold their charge for a very long time before self-discharging. So they're perfect for the camera I keep in the glove compartment and don't use for months at a time.

As to charging, I ALWAYS use an external charger for removable batteries. The built-in charging circuit in many devices is, to me, often questionable. A quality external charger can be more precise and you can monitor the process. And the heat generated inside the case during the charging process certainly isn't good for most electronics.

John
+1 on all of this. Also, my observation is that they tend to last longer per charge (more hours of service) when externally charged. If I eventually wear the battery cover out, I'll order a new one from Whistler. External charging = cheap insurance.
 
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