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repeaters and amplifers

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BCLG316

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Could I use a mobile repeater in my vehicle that is like 2 watts or 5 watts and hook it up to a 50 or 100 watt amplifier so the area would be covered for an public safety incident.
 

SteveC0625

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Could I use a mobile repeater in my vehicle that is like 2 watts or 5 watts and hook it up to a 50 or 100 watt amplifier so the area would be covered for an public safety incident.
Only if the repeater is authorized on the agency's FCC license. It would be highly unusual for a mobile repeater to be installed in the average fire fighter's vehicle. They are usually in chief's vehicles or other support units.

Linear amps for typical VHF and UHF public safety agencies are rarely used any more. You're far better off with a repeater package from one of the major manufacturers.

100 watts is probably excessive for typical fire ground operations. Even 50 watts is a hit much. If you are dealing with high rises or underground incidents, specialty systems are usually required.

When contemplating systems like these, consult a reputable radio company that specializes in this. You should not be relying on information gathered in an internet hobby forum.
 

BCLG316

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We are a Fire police squad and we are spread out far more then a standard fire ground operation. We have had incidents when shutting down a major roadway it can be 5 miles apart.
 

R8000

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This is an extremely bad idea.

You should consult a professional in your area who handles public safety radio systems.

I say this because the route your looking to take is simply going to end in intermod, squealing and probably locking up a channel until it times out. Then nobody talks.
 

R8000

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To add to this, there are many variables that need to be considered. Properly frequency separation, licensing, RFI avoidance...etc. If your area has a public safety trunking system and your a legit entity, they should be willing to give your group a talkgroup on the system.

Avoid in-band operations at all costs. If your agency uses VHF, then use a UHF VRS style repeater. If your agency uses UHF, then use a VHF VRS repeaters...etc.
 

prcguy

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Usually mobile repeaters use small flat pack, notch only duplexers that are rated for about 50w max, some less. At 50w they have barely enough isolation at rated spacing to perform adequately. What you can end up with is a repeater that can be heard at greater distance (comparing say 5 or 10w to 50w) but others cannot access it very well at a distance because the repeater receive side has been compromised with desense or transmitter noise getting in.

You could upgrade the duplexer but its going to get bigger for UHF and really big and expensive for VHF. You also would need to consider additional power requirements for 100w run from a vehicle and a repeater with 100w amp would easily be in the 25A range.
prcguy
 
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