Review my mast mounting idea

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BonziBuddy

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I've got two choices as to how I'm going to mount my antenna to the side of my roof. One is to use a basic Eaves Mount, and the other is to take a piece of plywood and cut it to look similar to pictured

I would prefer to do the plywood idea as it would look way nicer on my home. I'm wondering if anybody has any input or ideas they could give me for this? I'm going to use 4" Antenna Mast Wall Mount Brackets on the plywood.

Any suggestions? Below pic is exactly what I would like to have, except I will have a mast of maybe 2 or 3 feet. I live 300ft above sea level and do not need the height.
 

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gewecke

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That would work. Another idea would be to use the vent pipe on your roof,if you have one?
N9ZAS
 

iMONITOR

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If you use "plywood" make sure it's marine grade plywood. Otherwise the weather will destroy it quickly! Use bolts with flat washers for the mount, and big, long, brass wood screws to attach the wood base to the house.
 
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N_Jay

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Where you have the wood attached to the fascia board of the house you will be inviting rot by trapping water between the two boards.

I would use a proper eave mount bracket, or if you insist in the wood, then pre paint it and the section you are covering with a very good preservative paint, the caulk the upper edges leaving the lower edge open to drain.
 

BonziBuddy

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Where you have the wood attached to the fascia board of the house you will be inviting rot by trapping water between the two boards.

I would use a proper eave mount bracket, or if you insist in the wood, then pre paint it and the section you are covering with a very good preservative paint, the caulk the upper edges leaving the lower edge open to drain.
If you use "plywood" make sure it's marine grade plywood. Otherwise the weather will destroy it quickly! Use bolts with flat washers for the mount, and big, long, brass wood screws to attach the wood base to the house.
Thanks will do.

That would work. Another idea would be to use the vent pipe on your roof,if you have one?
N9ZAS
I was going to do it this way but my dad won't let me. Hes afraid of messing up the seal and having rain water damage the roof. He also does not like the look of the eves mount. The end of our house faces out toward a street, and basically for a couple of seconds the only thing drivers stare at is the side of our house. He's obsessed with keeping this part of the house so nice and clean. He thinks the plywood idea will make it look nicer to the neighbors, who he thinks care what our house looks like.
 

gewecke

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Here's an idea. What about suspending it from top,using some 30lb.test line to connect to the top with zip ties to a tree branch or something from above the antenna?
No,scratch that. Maybe ground mounting it to a mast would work?
N9ZAS
 

prcguy

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Sounds like an ok solution and doesn't look bad. Like others have said be careful with the plywood, prime and paint it real well.

You could also use square steel tubing around 1" X 1" and make a short section to span right below where the top fascia intersects and a longer one that would span about a foot below. Use a 1/4" lag bolt at each end of the tubing through the fascia into something more solid. Your basically making your own custom steel eaves mount.

You can then drill each steel tubing for a U bolt that is the right size for your mast or antenna and the end result would probably be stronger than the plywood. A good coat of rust preventative primer and paint would finish the job.
prcguy
 
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fuzzymoto

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I did a similar thing, but instead of using plywood, I used two lengths of galvanized angle iron atached to the eaves...one shorter piece up high and one longer piece down low...I then used u-bolts to attach the mast to the angle iron.
 

kc2rgw

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Yeah beware using the vent pipe. I checked with a plumber friend and they are generally just setting in a hole with no real bracing. You are asking for leaks when any torque is applied to them.

I ran lengths of hurricane fence top-rail for my 2m/440 antenna. They are 10 or 20' lengths normally. I got two 10 footers from Lowes or Home Depot, they slip joint together. I drilled the slip joint when assembled and used self-tapping screws to join them.

I anchored the bottom section with some pipe clamps to a board, at the 10' point just below the slip joint the top bracket of a side mount kit was placed on my gable facia and the mast is bracketed there. It's been up through some bad storms over the last two years and the 17' antenna is solid as a rock. Distributing my bracketing at the bottom of the mast and at the mid-point makes it so solid.

I wouldn't go another length high unsupported. I'd guy it if I went any higher.

A chimney mount can be o.k. too, but a big hint for that is to put a 2-3' length of angle iron at each corner of the chimney before you put the banding around it. This ensures the load is distributed very evenly on the chimney. A plain chimney mount only puts load on one or two courses of brick which is a very bad idea.

The hurricane fence top-rail is only about $10 a section for 10' lengths and is a lot easier to find locally than antenna masting these days.
 

kb2vxa

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If I were your dad I'd be more concerned with a big black cable hanging down, that picture looks fugly! Besides that the unsecured cable slaps the house when the wind blows and puts undue stress on itself and whatever is suspending it.

I threw my dog a bone by going all out to make it look neat and orderly while keeping it simple. I used a run of the mill eaves mount and ran the coax down under the eave out of sight (more or less) to a convenient location, then down inside steel electrical conduit (EMT) using weather tight fittings as per code. At the top was a standard cobra cap and at the bottom an entrance L where the cable went through the wall into the basement. As a finishing touch everything except the antenna was painted to match the house and looked rather like an ordinary service entrance. As they say your mileage may vary but you now have another idea to munch on... or run up the flag pole and see if dad salutes it.
 

ipfd320

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antenna mounting

i think the facure board idea looks good,there were alot of ideas thrown around for his project,as i see in the pic looks like he has enough room to tuck the coax in the eave and down the j corner channel,the only question i have is how far is the coax run to the radio from antenna point...good luck on your install.......73s for now
 

prcguy

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If you paint the galvanized brackets use a good self etching primer, otherwise the paint will flake off over time. Its very difficult to paint a galvanized surface and have it last.
prcguy

I used the "Rat Shack" eave mount kit with good success. The brackets are galvanizied as is all the mounting harware I used. Next time I'll paint the brackets white, (Rustolium) to match the trim on the house. Tucking the feed line and ground wire out of sight was easy...

Good Luck


Eaves Mount for Hanging Rafters or Trim Boards - RadioShack.com
 
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