Richmond Ambulance Authority UHF Simulcast (453.975)

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KF4ZTO

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I know there was an old thread on RAA (archived? - I couldn't find it...)

Anyway, RAA appears to be simulcasting RAA EMS 1 (TG 34688 on the TRS) on their old UHF frequency - 453.975 PL 67.0Hz. I've submitted this to the DB. Nice to hear their UHF machine back on the air as it always has been nice and loud. FCC license is up to date

WNYZ969 (City of Richmond) FCC Callsign Details
 

KF4ZTO

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^Thanks for the link to the old thread. If/when a mod sees this - could they merge the two fo them together?
 

lanbergld

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They simulcast on 453.975 for a long time after the Motorola trunking system began. Then around 2010 they stopped. Glad to hear they're back doing it again. But I wish they still used HEARS for enroute to hospital. I work at VCU Medical Center and was told that they call in by cell phone now.


Larry
 

djewel6

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Mesa, AZ
They simulcast on 453.975 for a long time after the Motorola trunking system began. Then around 2010 they stopped. Glad to hear they're back doing it again. But I wish they still used HEARS for enroute to hospital. I work at VCU Medical Center and was told that they call in by cell phone now.


Larry
Yeah HIPAA really clamped down on broadcasting patient info in the clear. When I ran Fire/EMS In Pittsylvania County in late 90's no such thing as cell service except in Danville proper and even had DIALUP (gasp) for internet hahaha..
 

BoxAlarm187

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HIPAA actually has nothing to do with the lack of HEAR in the Richmond area. EMS providers in the area have simply found it far easier to use a phone to call the hospitals on dedicated phone lines. The cell phones can be taken into the house for complex incidents, and there's no waiting for your turn on the radio if it's a busy day and many ambulances are trying to access HEAR at once.

HEAR and other radio-based field-to-hospital communications are still alive and well in other areas of the Commonwealth and US.
 
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