Roll Up J Pole vs Rubber Ducky

Status
Not open for further replies.

barryfltht

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
19
Location
Upstate, SC
I realize that the roll up (emergency) J Pole antennas are not an end all to poor indoor HT performance, but need opinions from others experience. Is this a viable alternative and is there measurable improvement over the rubber ducky when used indoors?

I have a Yaesu FT-60r and just get very poor reception (mostly noisy static) with it unless I move around to specific points inside my home office.. None of them are near my desk, which I would prefer to use the HT while home.

Thanks for the comments
Barry
 

LtDoc

Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
2,145
Location
Oklahoma
Almost anything is a 'better' alternative than the typical rubber-duck antenna. A 'roll-up' "J"-pole, or a 'solid' one will certainly beat those ducks. Of course, having it outside and higher would be better too. One of the handy things about those 'roll-up' "J"-poles is that if you have a window large enough you can tape them to that window. Or 'pin' it to the back of a curtain? Or... oh well, you get the idea.
- 'Doc
 

WA1ATA

Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
415
Location
Fairhaven MA / San Jose CA / Kihei HI
The cost and time it takes to make a roll-up J-pole is so small that you should just go ahead and give it a try.

If even the simple J-pole construction makes you hesitate, then an even simpler antenna is to just take a short length of coax and strip the outer shield from last 19". That makes it a 1/4 wavelength that you can position for better reception while keeping the HT several feet away. Or if you want to be a bit fancier, fold the braid back down over the outer insulator to form a bazooka antenna. This ultra-simple antenna lets you do the "tape it to the window" technique to get better reception.

If that doesn't work, then just chop off most of the 19" of exposed center conductor and use the coax as the feed for the roll-up J-pole.
 

LtDoc

Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
2,145
Location
Oklahoma
That end fed antenna described isn't a bazooka antenna by any means. It's been around for a very long time and has only started to be called a "bazooka" since some one has started manufacturing them. They needed a 'catchy' name, and that's all it is.
- 'Doc
 

barryfltht

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
19
Location
Upstate, SC
Thanks for the feedback guys.... I'll give one a shot. At the very least, if I don't get good results for indoor use, I'll still have it as a carry along for hanging in trees, etc.
 

hcpholder

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Messages
538
Location
Chattanooga, TN
I live in an apartment complex and I ordered the rollup J-pole for use indoors. All I have for the moment are HT's and it works very well. I've had good reports with oth signal and voice on it. I actually ordered one to use out on my stoop when I'm outside, which the apartment will allow.
 

Paulsan

Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2007
Messages
223
Location
York PA
Just get a cheap mag mount antenna and stick it on a file cabinet or a cookie sheet. It will work much better than the duck.
 

LtDoc

Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
2,145
Location
Oklahoma
Just a few things to keep in mind.

Probably the main attraction of those 'slim-jim' antennas is that they are easy to make. They are typically just a 1/2 wave radiator, so don't expect huge gobs of gain from them. A typical 2 meter 'J'-pole will work just dandy on 70 cm with no modifications at all. Not the 'best', but usable.
The idea of using a mag-mount antenna isn't a bad one. It would mean that it would also be usable on a vehicle, so it would have twice the utility.
The differences in antenna lengths, 1/4 wave, 1/2 wave, 5/8 wave mean a difference in the input impedances so the same impedance matching device seldom work, expect differences there. The biggest difference between the various lengths is the resulting radiation patterns. They are not all the same. The longer the antenna the 'flatter' that radiation pattern, and so there's a difference in the "gain" of each. No antenna amplifies a signal fed to it, they do change the 'shape' of the resulting radiation pattern, and that's where the 'gain' comes from, it's just 'moved' from one place to another.

You know your situation, want's better for you than I do, so you decide what you can 'live' with.
- 'Doc
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top