Running Coax Down from the attic

scannerpro

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
29
Location
Raleigh, NC
Does anyone have a good idea on how to run coax from the attic? Can't think of an idea or how to run it down the wall into a socket.
Would like to keep my 2M J Pole in the attic and not having to leave the steps down with the hot air pouring out.
 

prcguy

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
9,749
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
Use a stud finder or knock on the walls with your finger to see where the studs are and if there is a horizontal fire break. When you find an unobstructed vertical path down the wall go in the attic and drill an appropriate size hole through the wall top plate with a paddle bit and a 3/4" should fit a PL-259 or N connector.

Poke a hole in the wall 6" to 12" up from the floor in the unobstructed area and make a cutout to fit this frame that will hold a standard electrical cover plate. Carlon 1-Gang Non-Metallic Low-Voltage Old Work Bracket-SC100RR - The Home Depot then run the cable down into the wall and it should be easy to fish out of the hole as the cable will be less than 16" either side of your cutout.

You can then get a plastic or metal cover plate, drill a hole and run the coax through with a grommet or mount a double female SO-239 or N or BNC adapter on the plate so you have a female connector on the wall

Does anyone have a good idea on how to run coax from the attic? Can't think of an idea or how to run it down the wall into a socket.
Would like to keep my 2M J Pole in the attic and not having to leave the steps down with the hot air pouring out.
 

scannerpro

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
29
Location
Raleigh, NC
That was the idea I was thinking. I have tons of sockets opened from former cable TV television. Just can't open them up. It is the most clean way of doing it also. Thank you for your good help!
 

n5ims

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2004
Messages
3,802
I have had success running a wire down the wall inside a closet and then out into the room if your layout allows. Drill a small hole in the closet into the attic (just big enough for the cable, if needed you can seal it with caulk as a final step) and run the coax down the wall. Drill another hole through the wall (between the studs) at a good height (match existing outlets if you can or down just above the molding) and then to the radio. Removal is just as easy when you move. Just make sure there are no wires or plumbing in the wall where you're drilling.

For a better look, get a low voltage bracket (
Carlon 1-Gang Non-Metallic Low-Voltage Old Work Bracket-SC100RR - The Home Depot) and saw a hole to fit. This will allow you to easily route the cable(s) into the room. Next drill a hole in the wall's header. This can be done in the attic if you can find the right place or using an installer's drill bit (Milwaukee 3/4 in. x 72 in. Cable Bit-48-13-8375 - The Home Depot) from the hole you made for the bracket (the bit is long, but flexible enough so the drill can be in the room, not the wall). Just make sure that you verify you're around the center of the header board. Using this type of drill bit you can use the hole in the bit to help pull your wire quite easily. Finish things off using an appropriate cover plate This can be custom made using a barrel connector as indicated above, a premade one (if you can find them), or just a simple pass-thru like this one (Vanco Bulk Cable Wall Plate (Single Gang) - White).
 

popnokick

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 21, 2004
Messages
2,060
Location
Northeast PA
Your former cable TV coax system can used as a distribution system for one or more scanner (receive ONLY) antennas in your attic. I have an unused CATV outlet in almost every room of the house, and found that the junction / splitter was in the attic near the point of entrance of the TV cable. I connected my scanner antenna to the input of the distribution system and voila.... scanner antenna outlets throughout the house.
 

bharvey2

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,382
Your former cable TV coax system can used as a distribution system for one or more scanner (receive ONLY) antennas in your attic. I have an unused CATV outlet in almost every room of the house, and found that the junction / splitter was in the attic near the point of entrance of the TV cable. I connected my scanner antenna to the input of the distribution system and voila.... scanner antenna outlets throughout the house.

That works if the installation was performed properly. In my house the original cable runs were "daisy chained" rather than "home runned" to a wiring closet. I had to reinstall the cable when I moved in.
 

popnokick

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 21, 2004
Messages
2,060
Location
Northeast PA
Ahhh.... so you know intimately well what your CATV installation can / can't do in its currently installed state. I had to run a lot of cable traces and continuity checks on mine before I attached my scanner antenna in the attic.
 

bharvey2

Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,382
Ahhh.... so you know intimately well what your CATV installation can / can't do in its currently installed state. I had to run a lot of cable traces and continuity checks on mine before I attached my scanner antenna in the attic.
It took a bit of head scratching and disassembly, etc. to figure out how all of the old cable was run. The first ten years or so in the house I probably had a permanent "face palm" print on me as I discovered one ridiculous thing after another. For a number of years I could never figure out why there were really crappy patches in the walls along the ceiling in my living room (near a wet bar) the garage, the bedroom, etc. until I met up with a neighbor down the street who was friends with the original owner. Apparently the original owner had a hot tub on the deck area outside the master bedroom. Instead of having circuit run to the hot tub he poked holes in all of the aforementioned walls and ran a long extension cord!

But I digress. I have and would do, future runs just as PRCGUY described. However, if you have to drill through a firestop, consider a 6ft flex auger bit and placement tool. You can also get the same style of auger in a short bit as well. They are pretty aggressive and require a fairly powerful drill. If you opt to go with this type of bit. exercise caution when holding the drill. if the bit catches, the drill will whip around and smack you a good one........or so I've heard.
 

krokus

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
4,465
Location
Southeastern Michigan
For cutting a hole in drywall, for a standard size wall plate, a tool like this can help. (Used with an oscillating multi tool.) Harbor Freight has a similar option available.

 

K4RBT

Member
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
89
The patches were probably from opening up the wall to get around the fire breaks that are supposed to be there. Some contractors do not install them.
When I installed network cables in some of my families home, I ran into this. Fortunately, there was enough room in the attic to use what they call a bell hanger bit. It is about three feet long and the shaft is flexible. The only problem is to not hit a nail, it will jerk the drill out of your hands.
Something I bought to help is a Rigid fiber optic snake camera. The thing uncoiled is about four feet long. I stuff it doen the wall to see if there is a fire break and where the center is. I find the studs in the attic by the nailing. I built and remodeled homes with my older brother, a lot of framing and sheetrock work.
In my home the basement is only partly finished, so I went from the bottom for cable tv, telephone, network cables and feedlines.
 

prcguy

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
9,749
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
Drywall is easy, just pencil around the opening for the low voltage wall plate adapter for your template, jab the end of a drywall saw into the wall and start sawing. The whole job takes about a minute except for cleaning up the dust.


For cutting a hole in drywall, for a standard size wall plate, a tool like this can help. (Used with an oscillating multi tool.) Harbor Freight has a similar option available.

 

AK9R

Lead Wiki Manager
Super Moderator
Joined
Jul 18, 2004
Messages
6,376
Location
Central Indiana
For cutting a hole in drywall, for a standard size wall plate, a tool like this can help. (Used with an oscillating multi tool.) Harbor Freight has a similar option available.
Have a vacuum cleaner handy when you use this. The fine teeth and oscillating cutting action will generate a lot of dust that will get everywhere if you don't prepare for it.
 
Top