Sac Metro Fire dispatch

Status
Not open for further replies.

KD6HRI

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
61
Location
Citrus Heights, CA.
When I monitor Sac Metro Fire sometimes I hear a dispach term used that stumps me. I dont know how it's spelled, but I will do my best phonetically...."sync-ahh-be". Anybody know or have a clue? I would like to know because it seem to be a frequent term used when units are dispached and seems medical in nature. Thanks fellas!
 

NWtoSFO

Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2006
Messages
312
Location
Citrus Heights, CA
Had a paramedic from Sac City Fire that he ran a ton of syncope calls to the tent city every shift. All they wanted was to go to the hospital. I wonder what they could get at the hospital that they couldn't get being homeless?!? Hmmm?
 

KD6HRI

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
61
Location
Citrus Heights, CA.
Well thanks for the linky that explained the question posed. I agree that if an agency get saddled with a fair amount of these calls it could sap their budgets and tie up or delay valuable resources to respond to more important calls. Thanks again for your help!
 

KD6HRI

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
61
Location
Citrus Heights, CA.
I'm a Paramedic with Sac Metro. We use the term to describe when someone passes out or nearly passes out.
Hey thanks for what you do for Sac Metro Fire! I am a proud member of Sac Metro Fire CERT and its a pleasure to serve Metro Fire and our community. I appreciate your help with my question. Figured after some of the training I have been through I would have known, but didn't....
 

BlueZebra

Member
Joined
May 19, 2004
Messages
94
Location
California
Yeah .. it amazes me how many tax dollars are spent responding to calls for what amounts to a headache. Check the definition here
It isn't a headache, is fainting, which could be caused by heart problems, blood pressure problems, stroke, diabetes and a number of other things.

You have to remember people dialing 911 can be incredibly poor reporters of what is actually going on. "Fainting" usually implies a brief loss of conciousness, but I have seen people totally unresponsive when described as "fainted".
 
Last edited:

akulahawk

Member
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
21
Syncope is just a term for fainting. It implies a loss of consciousness. Near-syncope is when the person has almost lost consciousness. There are a lot of causes of syncope, some of them can be life threatening. The challenge is to determine what is causing the symptom of syncope.

I am also a paramedic.
 

kma371

QRT
Joined
Feb 20, 2001
Messages
6,204
I like the term DFO myself... but it sure doesn't sound all that good if a dispatcher says it over the radio.
I almost got in trouble for that once. But the call taker put it in there so that's how I read it :)
 

akulahawk

Member
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
21
I almost got in trouble for that once. But the call taker put it in there so that's how I read it :)
At least that way you have someone to blame... :D

Off the radio? I haven't been in the field in quite a while, but I still use the term with some regularity... like when I hear "syncope."
 

akulahawk

Member
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
21
Yep! It's one of those terms that not too many people use outside of certain contexts. It's a great term!
 

k7ng

Electronics professional
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
220
Location
CN73
Don't forget "Hamburger Helper", "Circling the Drain" and the ever popular "DRT"
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top