Scanner to Transceiver

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wonabet

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I have my license (KK4AHB) and so far have only listened to my scanner in my truck. It is connected to a NMO150/450/800. I could use some assistance on using my NMO with another antenna, and also some suggestions on what mobile radio to buy that will give me all i need to operate without emptying my bank account. A radio that will fill my needs and not think later on that I should have bought something better. I want to get involved in radio however being new, i am at a loss. Thank You. Joe
 

jaspence

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You need to give more detail on what you want the transceiver to cover, depending on your license class and planned future upgrades. No ham transceiver I know of will give you the coverage of a scanner, especially for any kind of digital reception, and a NMO mount will pretty well limit you to 2 meters, 440, 6 meters, 222, and 10 meters, which are covered in the technician license. Most antennas will only cover three bands at the most, and two bands (2 meter and 440) are the most common.
 

wonabet

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Fort Myers, FL.
If i have to change out the NMO mount, i am quite willing to do that.I only have a technician license. Believe me i have a lot to learn. I am not looking to reach any great distances. Just being able to communicate with other operators while in the learning process. Your info was very helpful in narrowing down my hunt for equipment. Thanks again.
 

jaspence

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The NMO mount is very usable for the ham bands. Most better antennas come with a choice of PL-259 or NMO. I have both, and there are adapters to change the PL to NMO. A good dual band transceiver (2 meter/440 is a good place to start. A used radio is a good way to keep cost down. It is fairly easy to check the asking price against the new price online so you won't pay too much. Something like an Icom IC-208 is a good starter transceiver. There are many sources online to look up repeaters and active clubs in your area. The ARRL websight has information on almost anything you need to know, including local hamfests where you can find a good radio. For a handheld radio, there are a few 2 meter models less than $100 now available and can be used with a mobile antenna as a real basic setup. There are also dual band handhelds under $200 that will serve as a learning tool. My personal suggestion is that with any radio, get the software (sometimes it is free) and the programming cable to make life easier to get things programmed correctly.
 

wonabet

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Sep 6, 2009
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Location
Fort Myers, FL.
Thank you very much for the replies. This gives me a good starting place to practice and increase my knowledge in ham radio. No need for me to go to the next level of a ham license until i have the basics nailed down. Thanks again.
 
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