Scanners missing FM bandwidth?

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Shopping for a new handheld scanner, and I noticed not even the PSR800 can listen to normal FM radio frequencies... :confused:

86-108mhz I think it is. If there's ever a hurricane (I live within a mile of the coast), or any other disaster I'd like to be able to listen for ANYTHING afterward! I'd also like to have this just to tune in some music and take a break once in a while when scanning. Wouldn't have thought that was asking a lot from a $400 radio... :roll: Seems like it would have been more effort to block these frequencies than to just leave them when making the radios. :mad:

Though nothing would surprise me... I can't believe it's illegal or anything. Is there a way to "enable" this simple missing feature on the PSR800?
 

ampulman

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Check out the Uniden scanners. My BCD396T (no longer made) can tune directly, or via a service search. I'm sure the XT model can also do.

While you can tune the FM band, it would be helpful in an emergency, but for recreational listening, the fidelity leaves something to be desired.

Amp
 

N8IAA

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Fortunately, GA
Is there a way to "enable" this simple missing feature on the PSR800?
No. It never was available on this scanner. The 396XT does have the FM broadcast band.
Now, if I was listening to public safety before, during, and after a major storm, I wouldn't interupt to listen to a local FM station on any of my scanners. That's why they make very inexpensive AM/FM emergency radios. The new PSR-120 supposedly has the FM broadcast band.
Larry
 

nanZor

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Shopping for a new handheld scanner, and I noticed not even the PSR800 can listen to normal FM radio frequencies... :confused:
You don't really want FM broadcast circuitry in a scanner for a number of reasons:

1) Attempts to make the audio hi-fidelity are just the opposite of what you want for a communications radio (typically 3-3K audio response)

2) When manufacturers include the FM broadcast band, and also the VHF air-band just above it, the temptation is to use a single passband filter that goes from 88-137 mhz, rather than divide it up into two distinct filter bandwidths. In congested areas, strong FM broadcast can overload / desensitize the scanner. That being said, I have a fire-breather station on FMB, yet my 396XT seems to be able to handle it just fine.

We are better off without FM broadcast coverage, and get tighter specs for the real purpose we bought the scanner for.
 
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stlouisx50

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I agree with the others. I have it in my old Uniden and get tons of overload, making it pointless. I can get AM Air Band fairly well with no issues as mentioned above.

If you are wanting something for Hurricanes ect. You could always listen to the Amateur Radio Operators in the 144-148 MHZ & 440.00-450.00 Mhz range. All-tho some ham radio operators have went to using digital mode, so they may have ruined your better of chances listening to them. I'd bet they would not use digital and stay on analog in those situations though.


FM radio is pretty slow with live news, You may be able to hear some of the local stations Remote Broadcasts, however it is illegal to do so apparently.
 

n5ims

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What else needs to be added to the current line of scanners:

What else needs to be added to the current line of scanners:
1. AM broadcast band. Sometimes you just have to get your talk radio fix.
2. Shortwave broadcast bands. WWV is great for setting your watch.
3. Broadcast TV (with video). Their radar is useful in severe weather.
4. Satellite TV (GRE gets DirectTV and Uniden can have Dish to keep things fair). Jersey Shore just can’t be missed and at times you’re not at home (but we always have our scanners!).
5. Built-in 4G internet (or 5G if it takes too long to add these features). Allow feeds without additional equipment, of course!
6. Bottle opener. Do you ever have a beer while listening to your scanner?
7. Rugged and waterproof case. Drop your scanner from a helicopter flying 1000’ above a lake, snorkel down to get it and have it working fine without any damage (and stop the “Wish there was a durable/rugged scanner” threads).
8. Cost less than $100 with free lifetime updates for new bands, modes, etc. Buy once and it’ll never become obsolete!
9. Built-in GPS so it never needs to be programming (it just knows what we want to listen to). The GPS and 4G internet work together to make sure it has the current programming for where we are and what we want to hear without us doing anything.
10. Most important, it actually works with all systems, new & old, conventional & trunking, analog & digital, single-site - multi-site - simulcast - etc. Basically it just works!
 

loumaag

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... You could always listen to the Amateur Radio Operators in the 144-148 MHZ & 440.00-450.00 Mhz range. All-tho some ham radio operators have went to using digital mode, so they may have ruined your better of chances listening to them. I'd bet they would not use digital and stay on analog in those situations though...
Depends. If they are P25 digital, the digital scanners have no problem with them, or as you suggest they can pass analog. If they are DStar, they can not be used with analog as DStar repeaters will not operate in analog mode.
 

kruser

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What else needs to be added to the current line of scanners:
1. AM broadcast band. Sometimes you just have to get your talk radio fix.
2. Shortwave broadcast bands. WWV is great for setting your watch.
3. Broadcast TV (with video). Their radar is useful in severe weather.
4. Satellite TV (GRE gets DirectTV and Uniden can have Dish to keep things fair). Jersey Shore just can’t be missed and at times you’re not at home (but we always have our scanners!).
5. Built-in 4G internet (or 5G if it takes too long to add these features). Allow feeds without additional equipment, of course!
6. Bottle opener. Do you ever have a beer while listening to your scanner?
7. Rugged and waterproof case. Drop your scanner from a helicopter flying 1000’ above a lake, snorkel down to get it and have it working fine without any damage (and stop the “Wish there was a durable/rugged scanner” threads).
8. Cost less than $100 with free lifetime updates for new bands, modes, etc. Buy once and it’ll never become obsolete!
9. Built-in GPS so it never needs to be programming (it just knows what we want to listen to). The GPS and 4G internet work together to make sure it has the current programming for where we are and what we want to hear without us doing anything.
10. Most important, it actually works with all systems, new & old, conventional & trunking, analog & digital, single-site - multi-site - simulcast - etc. Basically it just works!

Forget all of that! I think it should ALL be incorporated into the latest and greatest smartphone:roll:
 
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Methos

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kruser said:
What else needs to be added to the current line of scanners:
1. AM broadcast band. Sometimes you just have to get your talk radio fix.
2. Shortwave broadcast bands. WWV is great for setting your watch.
3. Broadcast TV (with video). Their radar is useful in severe weather.
4. Satellite TV (GRE gets DirectTV and Uniden can have Dish to keep things fair). Jersey Shore just can’t be missed and at times you’re not at home (but we always have our scanners!).
5. Built-in 4G internet (or 5G if it takes too long to add these features). Allow feeds without additional equipment, of course!
6. Bottle opener. Do you ever have a beer while listening to your scanner?
7. Rugged and waterproof case. Drop your scanner from a helicopter flying 1000’ above a lake, snorkel down to get it and have it working fine without any damage (and stop the “Wish there was a durable/rugged scanner” threads).
8. Cost less than $100 with free lifetime updates for new bands, modes, etc. Buy once and it’ll never become obsolete!
9. Built-in GPS so it never needs to be programming (it just knows what we want to listen to). The GPS and 4G internet work together to make sure it has the current programming for where we are and what we want to hear without us doing anything.
10. Most important, it actually works with all systems, new & old, conventional & trunking, analog & digital, single-site - multi-site - simulcast - etc. Basically it just works!

Forget all of that! I think it should ALL be incorporated into the latest and greatest smartphone:roll:
Nah, go smaller .... wristwatch lol
 

fineshot1

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Sep 17, 2004
Messages
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NJ USA (Republic of NJ)
What else needs to be added to the current line of scanners:
1. AM broadcast band. Sometimes you just have to get your talk radio fix.
2. Shortwave broadcast bands. WWV is great for setting your watch.
3. Broadcast TV (with video). Their radar is useful in severe weather.
4. Satellite TV (GRE gets DirectTV and Uniden can have Dish to keep things fair). Jersey Shore just can’t be missed and at times you’re not at home (but we always have our scanners!).
5. Built-in 4G internet (or 5G if it takes too long to add these features). Allow feeds without additional equipment, of course!
6. Bottle opener. Do you ever have a beer while listening to your scanner?
7. Rugged and waterproof case. Drop your scanner from a helicopter flying 1000’ above a lake, snorkel down to get it and have it working fine without any damage (and stop the “Wish there was a durable/rugged scanner” threads).
8. Cost less than $100 with free lifetime updates for new bands, modes, etc. Buy once and it’ll never become obsolete!
9. Built-in GPS so it never needs to be programming (it just knows what we want to listen to). The GPS and 4G internet work together to make sure it has the current programming for where we are and what we want to hear without us doing anything.
10. Most important, it actually works with all systems, new & old, conventional & trunking, analog & digital, single-site - multi-site - simulcast - etc. Basically it just works!
You forgot reception of subspace radio so we can listen in on the Enterprise. :))
 
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