Pro-106: Scanning 6 Meters

pjc2k5

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When using my RadioShack Pro-106 scanner around 50 MHz, it picks up various signals that are basically sequences of repeating whistles and tones. Are these some kind of signaling being used on these frequencies or is it some form of interference? I'm not that familiar with amateur radio, and I wasn't able to identify them. Also, I received similar sounding signals below 6-meter HAM band which makes me question whether these are genuine broadcasts. Besides these, I haven't picked up anything discernible in these bands. There's also a lot of buzzing and other noise from 25 - 50 Mhz, which makes it tough to even scan these bands.

I've attached a few example recordings of what I did pick up.
 

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jaspence

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6 meters is not easy to understand and varies from useless to frustrating. A ham friend and I had 6 meter HTs and lived about 1/2 mile apart. We had far better results with our FRS radios than any attempt to communicate on 6 m. My HT had a loaded whip antenna about three feet long.
 

wtp

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is the antenna near a TV, computer, modem, router, toaster ?
i threw in the toaster to see if you were paying attention.
 

ko6jw_2

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The lower portion of six meters is USB. There may also be CW or digital. Check the ARRL band plans. FM will be in the upper part of the band. There won't be a lot of activity. 52.525MHz is the simplex calling frequency.
 

WB9YBM

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When using my RadioShack Pro-106 scanner around 50 MHz, it picks up various signals that are basically sequences of repeating whistles and tones. Are these some kind of signaling being used on these frequencies or is it some form of interference?
In amateur radio applications tone signalling is usually sub-audible, unless you're hearing DTMF used for repeater control. Other whistles & such might just be heterodynes...
 

prcguy

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I've done some hill topping with a 2w military handheld on 6m and got about 60mi range. The same radios in the desert got over 10mi range with their 24" long antennas. I occasionally use a 5w military hand held with 1m long antenna and get into many 6m repeaters around here from 25 to 75mi away.

6 meters is not easy to understand and varies from useless to frustrating. A ham friend and I had 6 meter HTs and lived about 1/2 mile apart. We had far better results with our FRS radios than any attempt to communicate on 6 m. My HT had a loaded whip antenna about three feet long.
 

pjc2k5

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It does seem to be some sort of interference. I switched off some nearby electronics and that resulted in a change but not elimination of the noises. There was less noise when I went out to the garage. I'll still have to try shutting off even more devices and/or using the radio further from the house.

Another curious situation I discovered was that when I switched on my shortwave radio and had the scanner nearby, the scanner would sometimes begin to receive a nearby FM broadcast station on certain frequencies in the 2-meter ham band. As soon as I switched off the radio, the scanner stopped picking it up.
 

CycleSycho

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I've done some hill topping with a 2w military handheld on 6m and got about 60mi range. The same radios in the desert got over 10mi range with their 24" long antennas. I occasionally use a 5w military hand held with 1m long antenna and get into many 6m repeaters around here from 25 to 75mi away.


:) I remember... Oh the good ole days!.... Simple analog AM (sometimes skip) with almost no background 'noise'... :)


.
 

krokus

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It does seem to be some sort of interference. I switched off some nearby electronics and that resulted in a change but not elimination of the noises. There was less noise when I went out to the garage. I'll still have to try shutting off even more devices and/or using the radio further from the house.
The noise is likely a switching power supply, to something. They are popular right now, so it could be almost any item that plugs in.

Another curious situation I discovered was that when I switched on my shortwave radio and had the scanner nearby, the scanner would sometimes begin to receive a nearby FM broadcast station on certain frequencies in the 2-meter ham band. As soon as I switched off the radio, the scanner stopped picking it up.
Mixing of RF products, so the broadcast signal appears in the passband of the scanner.
 

pjc2k5

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After unplugging more items, it turns out several wall warts in particular were responsible for the bulk of the noise.
 
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