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SDS200 scanning volume

buddrousa

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Jan 5, 2003
Messages
5,611
Location
NW Tenn
#2
It is not your scanner it is the radio user or how the radio shop setup or did not setup the system. We have a local radio shop takes the repeater out of the box tunes the duplexers programs the radios never test them and hands them to the customers.
 

bob550

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Apr 5, 2005
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946
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Albany County, NY
#3
Welcome to the "wonderful world of scanning", haha. This is a common problem that is not scanner-specific, and has been addressed in the firmware of most scanners. Volume adjustments on a per-talkgroup/channel/frequency basis are common among both major manufacturers. I would suspect that your SDS200 has that capability as well. If the volume differences are consistent, I would make a compensating adjustment in Sentinel.
 

ofd8001

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Feb 6, 2004
Messages
6,092
Location
Louisville, KY
#5
In Sentinel, you have the ability to set a Volume Offset, from -3 (softer) to +3 (louder) per channel.

Sometimes a digital channel/frequency seems to sound louder than conventional. But as noted above, it is the nature of the beast.
 

ratboy

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Nov 3, 2004
Messages
798
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Toledo,Ohio
#7
I have one system that just makes me jump when they key up, as it's way louder than anything else. I've turned it down to -3 and it still blasts in most of the time. It's an ambulance company and it's DNR. Signal strength is way up there too, so it must be pretty close to home and work. Kind of the opposite of some of the "mumbling" stuff where you just can't make it out without the volume being up there so if the above system keys up, WOW. I kind of think I'm going to have to raise the level of the "mumblers" and see if that can balance it out without it driving me nuts.
 

ratboy

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Nov 3, 2004
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#9
Thanks for the suggestion, but it didn't do anything as far as I could tell. Makes me jump every time they key up. It's not common at night, but in the daytime, when I'm not usually listening, it's pretty constant.
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2008
Messages
3,118
Location
New Zealand
#10
In theory, signal strength has nothing to do with received audio level for FMN or FMW. Certainly some of my radios give much less audio for AM transmissions so I have one scanner dedicated to AM and the audio adjusted accordingly - the AGC in the radio should keep the levels reasonably similar. Having said that, you can't control how loud people speak or how close the the microphone they are - base station operators tend to have boom microphones just to the side of their mouth and which are often noise-cancelling which reduces the audio if you are even a couple of inches away from them. I feed most of my audio through a mixer so I can adjust individual inputs easily and I have seen circuits for audio levelling devices (Vogads) but otherwise I'm afraid it's something you just have to live with.
 
Joined
Sep 8, 2006
Messages
2,880
Location
Stockholm, Sweden
#11
The better the audio amplifier and speaker the more obvious the different audio levels will be due to the higher dynamics.
A less powerfull amplifier in a portable scanner and the very small speaker it uses will have less dynamic, not so big differencies between low and high audio levels. Officers use portable radios with remore mic/speakers and they crank up the volume to hear the low audio transmissions and other loud transmission makes the amplifier and speaker bottom out so that the volume can't increase more.

/Ubbe
 
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