Scantantenna assembly and installation

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sony

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On the transformer that comes with this antenna with 2 attached 300 ohm clamps, I notice that it has a rubber nipple that covers the coax connector on transformer. Is this only for transport protection and packaging purposes to protect transformer connection or is there suppose to be a way to secure this cover over the connector between coax-connection to transformer to antenna.?
It would seem to me and make sense that this covered the connection between transformer and coax cable but I don't see how it fits.
 

kb2vxa

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If all else fails read the instructions, it'll save you the agony of trying to outsmart a rubber nipple. I'll bet you have a stack of old yellow maps in the glove box and get lost a lot.
 
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JGP

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sony said:
On the transformer that comes with this antenna with 2 attached 300 ohm clamps, I notice that it has a rubber nipple that covers the coax connector on transformer. Is this only for transport protection and packaging purposes to protect transformer connection or is there suppose to be a way to secure this cover over the connector between coax-connection to transformer to antenna.?
It would seem to me and make sense that this covered the connection between transformer and coax cable but I don't see how it fits.
If you have a box cutter with a sharp blade, cut a small cross just big enough to push your coax throuth it. Push the coax through the cut you made. Then screw your coax into the transformer and slid the rubber nipple onto the transformer. It makes a good seal to keep water out. Make the cut as small as possible.
 

WouffHong

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Weather cover..

Despite the un-Ham-like quasi-sarcasm and lack-of-help you received, your question was not a sign of ignorance, but a sign of respect for our combined knowledge, and PLEASE never be afraid to ask ANY question here.

The Rubber cylinder does, indeed, cover the connector and Balun (The Black device that converts "unbalanced" 75-Ohm type F cable/connector to the "balanced" Twinlead), but sometimes it is a stretch and tug dance to get it on.. :) -- BTDT

Tried to find a photo, but found only this small one attached.. The Coax enters, of course, through the small round end, but that's obvious, I guess.. ;-) :)

Tom

sony said:
On the transformer that comes with this antenna with 2 attached 300 ohm clamps, I notice that it has a rubber nipple that covers the coax connector on transformer. Is this only for transport protection and packaging purposes to protect transformer connection or is there suppose to be a way to secure this cover over the connector between coax-connection to transformer to antenna.?
It would seem to me and make sense that this covered the connection between transformer and coax cable but I don't see how it fits.
 
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sony

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JGP said:
If you have a box cutter with a sharp blade, cut a small cross just big enough to push your coax throuth it. Push the coax through the cut you made. Then screw your coax into the transformer and slid the rubber nipple onto the transformer. It makes a good seal to keep water out. Make the cut as small as possible.
Make a small incision on the rubber piece that comes off?
 

sony

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w4nov said:
Despite the un-Ham-like quasi-sarcasm and lack-of-help you received, your question was not a sign of ignorance, but a sign of respect for our combined knowledge, and PLEASE never be afraid to ask ANY question here.

The Rubber cylinder does, indeed, cover the connector and Balun (The Black device that converts "unbalanced" 75-Ohm type F cable/connector to the "balanced" Twinlead), but sometimes it is a stretch and tug dance to get it on.. :) -- BTDT

Tried to find a photo, but found only this small one attached.. The Coax enters, of course, through the small round end, but that's obvious, I guess.. ;-) :)

Tom
Yes that is the part so I thinking why doesn't that piece fit over the coax to insulate and protect connection?
 

JGP

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sony said:
Make a small incision on the rubber piece that comes off?
The answer is yes. The big end fits onto the transformer. You make the cut on the small end where the coax goes through. It is the F connector that you are making the hole larger for.
 

mcema699

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Intended Application of Weather Boot

Yes, you can make the small cut and then seal the cut you have made.

The weather boot is meant to be used with an unfinished piece of coax, which you are cutting to length,without the connector.
Push the bulk coax through the boot, then attach connector of choice.

Note that most pre-assembled coax intended for outdoor use will have the previously mentioned weather boot already installed on one end. JMHO
 

TeRayCodA

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I've found after troubleshooting some Scantenna installs,moisture will intrude the supplied weatherboot.

Anymore,I just discard the boot,and smear a little silicone grease on the threads of the "F" connector on the balun.

Then,I'll tightly wrap the completed connection with some self-fusing rubber tape.Wrap a few layers of black electrical tape over the rubber tape,(it'll break down,crack in the elements,if left unprotected)and you'll have very good moisture proof seal.

Those weather boots don't seal very well.They can hold moisture,if it gets in,and corrode the connection.
 

sony

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TeRayCodA said:
I've found after troubleshooting some Scantenna installs,moisture will intrude the supplied weatherboot.

Anymore,I just discard the boot,and smear a little silicone grease on the threads of the "F" connector on the balun.

Then,I'll tightly wrap the completed connection with some self-fusing rubber tape.Wrap a few layers of black electrical tape over the rubber tape,(it'll break down,crack in the elements,if left unprotected)and you'll have very good moisture proof seal.

Those weather boots don't seal very well.They can hold moisture,if it gets in,and corrode the connection.
What I did was I got rid of that big plastic piece that is suppose to hold transformer and used those black ties. On the Transformer I put coax seal on the connections and then slid the rubber cap that came with transformer to cover that connection.
 

kb2vxa

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Hi again,

"Yes that is the part so I thinking why doesn't that piece fit over the coax to insulate and protect connection?"

My "quasi sarcasm" was intended to kick start your brain, I'm glad it did and now's the time to put it in gear. Those boots never go on right unless you give them a blast with a heat gun and then tussle with them trying to get them over the end of the coax before putting the connector on. When you give up in frustration you'll find another way to waterproof the connector.

The most common way is tightly wrapping it with cheap "Casa de la Rata" black vinyl tape forward and back as to overlap and criss-cross the turns. The "better" tape doesn't stretch as well so it doesn't shrink back and get as tight. If you really want to do it up right with an "everything proof" shield use Tommy Tape, that stuff is petroleum and corrosive materials resistant and seals like nobody's business. That's why it's used on marine electrical systems where just about anything can show up in the bilge.

Since wrapping the whole balun transformer is an effort in futility you'd be better off with an outdoor TV balun. If you REALLY want to do it justice lightly wrap the spade lugs with tape and dip it several times in that liquid rubber stuff used for coating tool handles. I can't quite remember what it's called but you'll recognize it when you see it at the hardware store. I've done this on several TV antenna installations and there's NO WAY moisture is going to get into anything.

Now PLEASE don't ask what to do with that discarded rubber nipple, I just might tell you. (;->)
 
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